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I have been running the original Goodyear Wrangler Fortitudes for 5 years. They are the most wonderful tires I've ever seen in every category. Can't find a single fault with them. I will buy them again for sure. Someone mentioned Hankook Dynapro. I ordered my F150 with them and was not pleased at all.
 

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The OEM tires were wearing well, took them off at 30K with lots of tread left, hated to do that, but each tire had at least one plug in it, and a couple of the plugs (put in my me) were closer to the edge than any tire shop would do, so I felt I was on borrowed time. For grins, here is the truck getting the new tires, which I got from Tire Rack, home installation. It was like a NASCAR pitstop :cool:

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The AT3's are far better in snow, but the OEM tires got me through snow too. Went dirt biking in Utah, was beautiful there, hit snow on the way back to Denver. Was in 4x4 for miles, the low slung trailer was floating around back there, tires not really touching the ground. What a PITA that return trip was, the trailer and the poor bikes were completely hammered.

These trucks are good in the fluffy snow like this stuff. Luckily there was no ice - just a lot of lovely thick Colorado powder. :LOL:

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After 70k, I figured I could blow some money on new tires. Grass was greener, but I left off one point. I think the Defenders were slightly worse on gas mileage.
I have 30k on mine.

The AT adventures seem to work extremely well on gravel and loose dirt. Which is where most of my off roading is.

My only complaint is the 255/65/17 Goodyear AT Adventures are made specific for the Colorado. They are different from other versions. How different? I don’t know. But the Colorado Goodyear ATs are $50/tire cheaper than the ‘normal’ Good Year AT Adventure with Kevlar.

That tire name is too long. Let’s just call them the OEM Z71 tires.
 

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I have 30k on mine.

The AT adventures seem to work extremely well on gravel and loose dirt. Which is where most of my off roading is.

My only complaint is the 255/65/17 Goodyear AT Adventures are made specific for the Colorado. They are different from other versions. How different? I don’t know. But the Colorado Goodyear ATs are $50/tire cheaper than the ‘normal’ Good Year AT Adventure with Kevlar.

That tire name is too long. Let’s just call them the OEM Z71 tires.
There could be some engineering detail that GM requested for the truck or Goodyear made a cheaper version to win the GM contract. Hard to say if it is not listed in the spec sheet.

It could be that Goodyear offers it cheaper per it is a higher volume seller too. They make up the price with volume?

One thing OE truck tires suffer from is the government drive by noise requirements. Often the tread is made differently to make less noise and it can effect some tire traction in some conditions.
 

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I've had no major issues with my OE GY's on my Canyon. I have 40k on it now. I'm in Michigan so plenty of snow/ice. Most days I don't even bother with 4wd or auto, just leave it in 2wd. I did run over a screw about a year and a half ago so I had it patched. Now I have a slow leak in one tire, and I'm hoping it's the same one but I haven't investigated yet. I'm hoping other tires are as great as everyone says as I don't hate these.
 

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Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac on my full-size 4x4 van , loved them . Dry , pavement , dirt and snow .. no issues .
 

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...

My only complaint is the 255/65/17 Goodyear AT Adventures are made specific for the Colorado. They are different from other versions. How different? I don’t know. But the Colorado Goodyear ATs are $50/tire cheaper than the ‘normal’ Good Year AT Adventure with Kevlar.
...
You want to talk specific tires for a vehicle?

In 1981, I went looking for tires on my 1978 LTD II. I would call up tire shops, give them the size tire I was looking for, and they would say, "Oh, you have a Ford LTD II." I can't remember if they actually stated the model year. In 1981, the prices were crazy. My uncle worked for Montgomery Wards in the tire shop, he was able to get me a special deal, buy 3 tires and get one free. My memory was it was $500 for that set of tires, and that was just installed and balanced, no road warranties back then. And those tires were junk, didn't hold up well. I was in college at the time, blew all of the money I saved up working that summer on tires. I didn't pay that much for another set of tires till at least 15 years later.
 

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When I bought my 2016 Colorado, it had the stock GY's on, with about 9K miles. In the first light snow, I was using 4wd just to get moving. They were horrible! I immediately replaced them.

My 2020 has the same tires. I expected to replace them right away, but decided to wait until we had a little snow to see how they would do. They are great!. Good traction for moving and stopping. Predictable. I can easily make a controlled drift in the corners when I want to. I'm really surprised at how well they do. I think I'll keep them for another year.
 

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When I bought my 2016 Colorado, it had the stock GY's on, with about 9K miles. In the first light snow, I was using 4wd just to get moving. They were horrible! I immediately replaced them.

My 2020 has the same tires. I expected to replace them right away, but decided to wait until we had a little snow to see how they would do. They are great!. Good traction for moving and stopping. Predictable. I can easily make a controlled drift in the corners when I want to. I'm really surprised at how well they do. I think I'll keep them for another year.
Good point as not all snow is the same. There is just some snow that even the best winter tires will not grip well in. While other now can be easy to drive in.

Even in rain it depends on the road too. Some have less aggrigate like in South Carolina and Florida and it can be more slick. Or even in So Cal where they get so little rain that when it does there is a lot of oil on the roads.

Lots of variables all the way around.
 

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Good point as not all snow is the same. ...
As a Southern boy, I am not overly familiar with snow variety. Usually what we see in my area is snow mixed with sleet and freezing rain. Quickly turns to ice. Of course, the 130+ car pile up in Fort Worth last week was simply an ice event.

Last week around my house, most of the precipitation fell as snow with the temp in the teens. I literally took my portable leaf blower I purchased for camping and kept my windshield clear and even blew off my patio with it. First time I have ever seen that type of snow.

I normally find driving on snow of any type to not be a problem, it is after a few vehicles pack it down, melt it, then it refreezes to a sheet of ice that the problems arise. At that point, I would assume chains or studded tires are your only hope, something I have never done.

I can see where tires will behave differently on different types of snow, just makes the whole tire decision even harder to sort out.
 

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If you grew up with snow it is really not that big of a deal. You learn car control and to space things our a bit. The greatest trouble is when people with bald tires try to drive in the snow and just clog things up for everyone else. I try to go to the back roads as most of those bald tire avoid them back roads.

Not much works on ice. Winter tires are the best for Ice but they skid too. Not as far but they still skid. Studded tires are ok in some cases but they tear up concrete drives and are not worth the trouble anymore.

Chains are ok way off in the mountains. But in most cases in most areas the road crews keep up. If they get behind just take your time and go later or just go slower.

Most people are convinced you can't get anyplace unless you have winter tires FWD or AWD. Well people got around for years with RWD and crappy bias snow tires. Most of todays tires are so much better even the poorest ones to what we had.

What used to be the best thing is just go to an open parking lot and let the car lose in drifts and donuts to learn how to control the car. Today so many cars have so many traction aids that it makes it difficult in some to shut off and teach car control. Even with all the aids they have their limits and you need to learn how to prevent a spin or control a drift.

Years ago I loved working nights in the winter as I had the road to myself. You just plowed along and never had an issue.

The only car I got stuck was my old GMC Sprint SP. It had a Big Block and no weight in the real. It was a hand full.

The Fiero when I first got it was in the snow. It went straight fine but the light nose really liked to understeer and then the rear would like to step out on drop throttle over steer. A Corvette engineer asked a Fiero engineer about the Fiero. He said it was like tight rope walking in ice skates. The Pontiac engineer said Pontiac Builds Excitement. To be honest it really was not bad till the snow got deep. The nose would ride up on the snow if it was deep enough. I used to take my mothers car back then since I was still at home.

Remove the people that can't drive in the snow and it can really be fun. I just hate the cold anymore.
 

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If you grew up with snow it is really not that big of a deal. You learn car control and to space things our a bit. The greatest trouble is when people with bald tires try to drive in the snow and just clog things up for everyone else. I try to go to the back roads as most of those bald tire avoid them back roads.

Not much works on ice. Winter tires are the best for Ice but they skid too. Not as far but they still skid. Studded tires are ok in some cases but they tear up concrete drives and are not worth the trouble anymore.

Chains are ok way off in the mountains. But in most cases in most areas the road crews keep up. If they get behind just take your time and go later or just go slower.

Most people are convinced you can't get anyplace unless you have winter tires FWD or AWD. Well people got around for years with RWD and crappy bias snow tires. Most of todays tires are so much better even the poorest ones to what we had.

What used to be the best thing is just go to an open parking lot and let the car lose in drifts and donuts to learn how to control the car. Today so many cars have so many traction aids that it makes it difficult in some to shut off and teach car control. Even with all the aids they have their limits and you need to learn how to prevent a spin or control a drift.

Years ago I loved working nights in the winter as I had the road to myself. You just plowed along and never had an issue.

The only car I got stuck was my old GMC Sprint SP. It had a Big Block and no weight in the real. It was a hand full.

The Fiero when I first got it was in the snow. It went straight fine but the light nose really liked to understeer and then the rear would like to step out on drop throttle over steer. A Corvette engineer asked a Fiero engineer about the Fiero. He said it was like tight rope walking in ice skates. The Pontiac engineer said Pontiac Builds Excitement. To be honest it really was not bad till the snow got deep. The nose would ride up on the snow if it was deep enough. I used to take my mothers car back then since I was still at home.

Remove the people that can't drive in the snow and it can really be fun. I just hate the cold anymore.
Well, I did not grow up in snow, I hear it snowed the year I was born back home. I was born in June, never figured out if it was the January before I was born or the December after I was born. None of the pictures include me nor my mom to see if she was pregnant.

The day after I brought my 1985 RWD S-10 Blazer home, we got significant snow in Shreveport. I didn't have any issues driving, figured the extra weight of the SUV made it more sure-footed.

As far as road crews in Texas, I point to the pile up in Fort Worth as Exhibit A in the lack of road crews to handle significant winter weather. I was actually surprised how much snow they did scrape up around here with front end loaders. Got the roads cleared pretty quickly as it warmed, amazing how quickly it warmed up and how quickly we melted out.

As far as hating the cold, it just plain hurts at my age. My shoulders and hands ache constantly. It is the one reason I love the heated steering wheel, never thought that I would ever see that as a required option in the South.
 
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Does anyone like these stock Goodyear wranglers? I just bought my '18 with about 20k miles on it with what I assume are the OE Wranglers.

We're having some snow, etc here - what an absolutely terrible tire. @20k miles, the tread is marginal at most and they just feel greasy and unplanted, even on just wet pavement. I dont even want to imagine taking them on some wetter dirt/gravel roads.

My last experience with Goodyear Wranglers was in the 90's on an S-10 that i dearly loved, but they were junk tires back then, and apparently still junk tires today. Can't wait to get rid of them.

Sorry for the rant. Searching tire/wheel packages now for the Spring!
I have stock wranglers and have been off-road/cross country/snow/mud holes/water holes. No issues. In my experience user error is usually the issue or high expectancy of output from equipment as opposed to user. Like blaming the scope on a rifle 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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I don't have an issue with them in sand and dirt, they're nice and quiet on the road, and we don't get much rain. Wear seems pretty decent so far. Check your alignment, did you rotate them?

I'm really curious what the difference between the stock OEM compound is versus the aftermarket Wrangler in the same size. I know Land Rover is putting a version of these on the new Defender, I wonder if that is any better. I think that's in a 20" size which would be nice for us Denali people.
 

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The stock Wrangler AT Adventure tires were just on the threshold between garbage and barely tolerable that I kept them on until the tread on one of them was gone. It was weird too, because the other tires had 2x as much tread left as the bad one. But between the Goodyear credit card and a sale price I got Duratracs which I am much happier with - 255/75/17, so a 1" lift and it fills out the wheel wells better and looks great. My dad even asked me what I did to my truck after he borrowed it because it is a huge improvement in almost every category except gas mileage, which I can live with.
 

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Does anyone like these stock Goodyear wranglers? I just bought my '18 with about 20k miles on it with what I assume are the OE Wranglers.

We're having some snow, etc here - what an absolutely terrible tire. @20k miles, the tread is marginal at most and they just feel greasy and unplanted, even on just wet pavement. I dont even want to imagine taking them on some wetter dirt/gravel roads.

My last experience with Goodyear Wranglers was in the 90's on an S-10 that i dearly loved, but they were junk tires back then, and apparently still junk tires today. Can't wait to get rid of them.

Sorry for the rant. Searching tire/wheel packages now for the Spring!
I got the Goodyear wrangler duratracs and this year in Orange County NY we had over 2 feet of snow and I got through everything with ease
 

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The stock Wrangler AT Adventure tires were just on the threshold between garbage and barely tolerable that I kept them on until the tread on one of them was gone. It was weird too, because the other tires had 2x as much tread left as the bad one. But between the Goodyear credit card and a sale price I got Duratracs which I am much happier with - 255/75/17, so a 1" lift and it fills out the wheel wells better and looks great. My dad even asked me what I did to my truck after he borrowed it because it is a huge improvement in almost every category except gas mileage, which I can live with.
A perfect example that just because the tires say Wrangler that they are all the same.

The same thing applies to othe lines like Eagle, Pilot and other brand lines. Often each line as specific tires for specific things or advancements in tech Based on the last update.

I think there are at least 15-20 Wrangler types.
 

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They ARE garbage. Thank goodness I got a bad nail puncture on one at 30k, and went to Falken Wildpeaks. Night and day in snow or ice.
 

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I have a 2016 Colorado LT and removed the stock tire that broke loose in the rain. I put on Falken Wildpeak A/T3W. they have been good in the rain and we have recently had some snow and they were very good in the snow. Don't know about tread wear yet.
 
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