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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Those of us that are in the rust belt, what have you been using to try to keep rust at bay? Considering WoolWax for my Colorado
 

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Live in TX, and do not know anything about WoolWax, but I had the Complete Ziebart Rustproofing job done on a 73 Chevrolet Truck. The job where they undercoat the entire bottom af the vehicle, then they punch 1/2” holes in all the hollow body panels, doors, tailgate, etc. Then they take and insert their spray nozzle in the holes and spray inside the hollow panels, then they cap the holes with plastic plugs. Back then the job cost $375 for all. I cannot say anything negative about it. Never had a rust problem. If you are up North, my only concern would be how well they clean it it remove the existing salt that you may have on it. In the 70’s, the dealers were pushing the Ziebart Undercoating at the time of sale.
 

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Please don't use anything that is not petroleum based. You will utterly destroy your car. Yes it protects some against rust, but it traps moisture in between the coating and metal and causes rust to build at a much faster more detrimental rate. Use petroleum based coatings like Boeshield T9 or Fluid Film. There aren't any coatings, short of what OEM's use, that will protect longer than a year in the rust belt. Petroleum based coatings should be applied twice a year, or once per 6 months; best times are spring and fall.

This video explains it well:
 

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Excellent topic and what a eye opener video, thanks for posting. After just having to bandage up the brake lines on my 05 Buick. My new truck, I was wanting to do something to preserve it somewhat. We use Cozmalene (sp) at work. It's a metal protector. I'm pretty sure it petroleum based. I was thinking about applying it to some bare metal parts. That, or plane ol' grease and oil...
 

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Excellent topic and what a eye opener video, thanks for posting. After just having to bandage up the brake lines on my 05 Buick. My new truck, I was wanting to do something to preserve it somewhat. We use Cozmalene (sp) at work. It's a metal protector. I'm pretty sure it petroleum based. I was thinking about applying it to some bare metal parts. That, or plane ol' grease and oil...
Yes sir, I totally agree on the Cozmalene. As a retired machinist of 40 years, I hated cleaning that stuff off parts prior to machining, but it is the BEST rust protectorant you can get. Bioshield T9 doesn’t even compare. People like Bioshield because they normally use it on something that they want to not rust, but be able to clean it off later. The only down side, is the Cozmalene would be harder to apply. Cozmalene will last long without re-application. Another good product to consider is LPS 3. It’s an aerosol product.
 
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I use Krown. I apply it myself. No rust at all under my truck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am leaning towards getting WoolWax. It’s something I think I could push in my shop. It’s made by the makers of fluid film but is a lot more thicker and says it is less prone to spray off and can hold for one year. It also continuously creeps. Plus it has zero VOCs which I like. Ziebart is a drive for me. The closest one to me is closing down
 

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Fluid Film is great stuff. Like Frank's Hot Sauce "I use that $!^* on everything" auto/truck/shop related. But it does have its drawbacks. The smell does not bother me one bit, but some hate it. It does cause certain rubber type products to warp or disform. It collects dirt & every time you work on vehicle you're going to get filthy dirty. I had 1 shop refuse to work on my truck because of getting filthy dirty every time. Lol

Benefits far outweigh the cons, IMHO anyway. Just traded in a 2008 Power Wagon with zero body rust. 10 years of Buffalo winters and salt. Yes, the regular FFilm does wash off in high salt spray areas.....but there is a thicker brush on version available too. I often wondered why the NYS DOT does not use FFilm on the underside of new bridges. Pigeons hate that stuff on their feet, so it would eliminate all the highly corrosive bird droppings and eliminate the rust from all the salt. I have seen new bridges go up & 15 yrs later are almost junk from rusting out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well the makers of FluidFilm make WoolWax. It’s the same thing but a lot thicker. Now you’ve got my interests if the regular FF kept a 2008 ram rust free. Those rear quarters don’t last for anything here in ohio
 

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I think I've read it somewhere in here, but can't seem to recall. How much product is needed for the underside of our trucks?
 

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I bought the entire professional under coating kit from them. Spray gun, straight hose, flex hose, 360* flex hose, 1/2" hole drill bit, plastic hole plugs. It works awesome. I bought a 5gal bucket of Ffilm. Have done 4 vehicles with it. I did one for a friend but he brought a gal with him.

It is messy. Suggestions: windless day, a couple of cheap blankets/sheets/tarps, a throw away set of sweat pants and hoodie. It is worth the investment. Mine paid for itself just doing our 4 cars. So satisfying being able to do it right. Our 2010 Corolla has 170,000 miles, & 8yrs of Buffalo winters & zero rust on body.
 

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Fluid Film is made from Lanolin, which is squeezed from sheep's wool. There is 2 different formulas. One is spray on & the other is the thicker brush on formula.
 

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I've used Fluid Film for years and I tried the Woolwax when they came out with it. Woolwax absolutely blows the old Fluid Film away. Fluid Film washes off the undercarriage too fast. It's not thick enough in my opinion. Woolwax sprays on just as easy, but lasts much longer. The 1st time I used it I kept checking every few days, then avery few weeks. Now I look a few times a year and I am amazed how the Woolwax holds up. I'm tempted not to even re-apply this year because I don't think it needs it. But for $50 bucks a year I'm going to shoot the undercarriage again.
 

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If you are going to keep it no longer than 12 years save the money. Most of today’s vehicles will run 12 years in the rust belt here and not suffer great issues of rust.

Today’s models have decent protection to go that long.

Just my experience on the last number of cars and truck I have owned. Most are kept 8-12 years with not major rust issues that Rust proofing would have prevented.
 

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I got an undercoating done at Zeibart's as well. I think I paid roughly $350 or so, but the best part is you can bring it back every year and they will re-do it for free!
 

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If you are going to keep it no longer than 12 years save the money. Most of today’s vehicles will run 12 years in the rust belt here and not suffer great issues of rust.

Today’s models have decent protection to go that long.

Just my experience on the last number of cars and truck I have owned. Most are kept 8-12 years with not major rust issues that Rust proofing would have prevented.
My experience has been different than yours. I find that the chemicals being used on the roads today do a tremendous amount of damage. Even after the 1st winter. I've had brake lines deteriorate in no time. I think that all of the protective coatings work to a certain extent. Some much better than others. I'm not a fan of the one-time permanent rubber coatings because you cant see whats going on under the coating (corrosion). I find that the annual maintenance applications (like Woolwax) do indeed save quite a bit of money on repairs and prolong the useful life of the truck.
 

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Yes, auto companies have come a long way with using anti corrosive techniques to fight rust. but if you live near the ocean, or salt covered winter roads, it is simply is not enough. The liquid brine that is sprayed on winter roads is a huge challenge for automakers, as it will destroy galvanized coatings and many components, such as break lines, sensors etc.. I went with Ziebart on my 2018 Colorado and I couldn’t be happier with the professional job they did. I believe Ziebart is one of the best in the business. If history repeats itself as with my 1975 Camaro, which had Ziebart and NO frame or floorboard rust after 12 years, I’m sure I’ll continue to be a very happy customer.
 
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