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2010 Chevy Colorado Crew Cab 4x4 Z71 V8
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My offer still stands. I’ll take you out and test the limits of your stock truck. I think the only disconnect is you. You’re too scared.

I’ve taken several stock trucks out for a good time that resulted in zero damage.

I’m heading back out to the WV backcountry after Christmas for a 3 day trip that would be perfect for a novice.

Kevin, get off the internet and get out and explore. If you’re interested in my after Christmas trip let me know.
 

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In practice, it's not the truck that is the issue in a good percentage of the cases where adventure failures occur if not the majority. It's human error that determines the outcome of engineering and steel. Ego and ignorance play a big role but yes there are some physics that need to be addressed but again most trail rides and overlanding is not about having the most efficient off-road machine but getting the loose nut behind the wheel in check.

Get out there on some simple dirt roads and use it to see what you are capable of doing on loose dirt and graduate to pot hoes, whoops, hills and so forth and most of all, spend time repeating practices to learn how the vehicle feeds back to you and under which instances you feel comfortable. The truck has LOTS of features and so much capability but spend some time and see what everything GM has put in does and how it can work for you. Don't make it your first trip where you are learning how to engage your front locker or trying to figure out downhill descent.

When you have your due diligence done, go with people. Watch and don't be afraid to stay in your comfort zone but also respect the group environment. Generally speaking if you make the effort to show up, people will provide group courtesy but expectations someone is going to tend to your needs will quickly wear out a welcome. Just don't expect the knowledge handout or lesson and know when you are slowing the pace and don't get yourself in a bind when you are uncomfortable and push under peer pressure to do things that might exceed your capability. Everyone is new once and everyone's skills can use practice, some are just a little more communicative. Be humble but be honest and you will be fine.

Mostly, like the other reply, get out on the dirt before you start a discussion on why you are are are not getting attention on the internet. You have a great truck that IS VERY CAPABLE stock .. go have some fun.
 
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You seem to be in the headspace similar to glamping (glamorous camping), where you just can't go camping because you don't have this fancy rooftop tent or dometic fridge or some other BS. F that. Grab a map or google search your area for attractions like lakes or abandoned mines, lookouts, etc. Compile a list of possible places you want to check out and start researching. You will find reviews on the attraction itself and typically the roads leading up to them. Once you figure out where you want to go, plan it. Go slow, go prepared. Tell a friend. Know about any offroad recovery groups in your area and how to reach out to them if you need help. If you take your time, and come up to a gnarly spot, back her out and find another trail. Route mapping/tracking on a GPS app is also helpful to see where you came from. I recommend Gaia. Learn how to use it, download maps for the area you are exploring and you can even pre-chart your routes on their website. I like the satellite view for the desert because you can see the tracks on the dirt. Makes it a bit difficult in forested areas but that's what other map styles are for.

Doesn't seem like you have found it yet, but once you do find a decent FB group in your area, then post on there as a "tell a friend" if you are going alone. Someone may want to tag along. Throw up a simple, "Planning to check out Lake Whatever or Mountain Lookout on Saturday. Any recommendations for my stock Colorado?" Hopefully those groups are active enough or just throw it on multiple groups and see the responses. Hell, throw it on this forum too. If you want a really active forum, TacomaWorld. Plainly put, specific questions receive specific answers. I personally don't tend to respond to "What trails are stock friendly?". Because you need to start prying for info and figure out what they are comfortable with. Ain't nobody got time for that. My stock friendly is definitely more than your stock friendly by probably 2-3 points on a trail rating system. Asking if such and such trail is stock friendly, I would be obliged to answer if I have done it.

One last thing, if you are seeing flipped and damaged vehicles on a stock friendly group ride, that is 100% driver error picking an alternate line. Out here in Vegas, there are many "stock friendly" trails BUT that doesn't mean you won't scrape something. It just means that stock tires and no lift are capable of getting through the trail without recovery.
 

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A man has got to know his limitations.

Stock trucks can do much but you need to know It’s limitations as well as the drivers.
Too often people get in over their heads and their judgment fails the driver and truck.
if you don’t know how deep the water is or the mud don’t go in. If you have no winch don’t go in. If there are large rocks and you lack skids don’t go in.

The way to find out what to do get with a experienced group and let the teach you and help find those limitations.
 

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2010 Chevy Colorado Crew Cab 4x4 Z71 V8
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Something to keep in mind. People get on Facebook and other social media outlets to look at Overland adventures. Those groups or even “professionals” with sponsorships and cool gear are just like the rest of us.

They’ll focus on the really cool sections of a trail for a drone video with hours of editing. What they don’t show is that most trails or gravel roads don’t even require 4wd. They have to make it look tough to stand out in the vast ocean of Overlanders.

A lot of the places I go are nothing more than gravel roads that could be traversed by a stock vehicle. All of my modifications came as a result of pushing further into trails that yield better solitude. Those necessary modifications come with time.

The internet would have you believe that the lack of 33”+ KO2 tires and boron steel skids will result in a stranded vehicle and miles of hiking to call for help. Nonsense! General truck preventative maintenance is vastly more important than anything when it comes to truck camping.

Most of my initial WV exploration was in a bone stock truck. I’ve spent 30+ years wondering around the Mountain State but building a tailor made truck has only happened in the past 10 years.

I’ve taken a few people on my trips who had your same attitude. It’s like they’re at the end of the diving board but can’t seem to jump. Camping is a simple hobby that’s complicated by many.

What I do is literally drive around with curiosity. There might be 6 trips in a row where I’ll find nothing new or interesting. On the 7th trip I’ll stumble across something new that was just around the corner from the previous 6 trips.

Pre-made routes and Facebook groups deny you the curiosity that is mandatory to achieve adventure. You seem to be overly concerned about damage to your truck. I will admit that you can’t camp out of a truck without a few scratches and a chipped windshield here or there. It’s going to happen so accept it as the truth. I’ve never purposely tried to damage my truck but if you walk around looking at it you’ll see evidence of my travels.

Go purchase a good goose down sleeping bag and a mat. Pack your long handles and enjoy winter exploration. Don’t waste the chance to drive around in cold weather curiosity.

Get out and get curious.
 

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I've a bone stock 2017 2.8 LT Colorado. Went up Tray Mountain Rd in Helen Ga. to pickup my daughter in law off the Appalachian Trail.
All trails tags it as difficult which is accurate.
 

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My stock truck has survived the Silver Lake sand dunes a few times. I did remove the air dam and add a skid plate before the first trip there. It was a ton of fun and makes me want a ZR2 so I can go faster. My buddies stock Wangler was a blast out there too. He could go faster than I could or wasn’t as worried. I’ll have to say each time it gets more fun because I worry about things less. But I really don’t know how much I can push it. And I haven’t seen a lot of non ZR2’s out there.
 

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I must say, it seems like you're plugging your YouTube channel and Instagram all in one here. 👎
 

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My stock truck has survived the Silver Lake sand dunes a few times. I did remove the air dam and add a skid plate before the first trip there. It was a ton of fun and makes me want a ZR2 so I can go faster. My buddies stock Wangler was a blast out there too. He could go faster than I could or wasn’t as worried. I’ll have to say each time it gets more fun because I worry about things less. But I really don’t know how much I can push it. And I haven’t seen a lot of non ZR2’s out there.
It's great that you're getting out and using your truck to explore and have fun, but you're slipping into that same headspace. You don't need a ZR2 to go fast and have fun. Sure, it comes much better equiped out of the box, but your are not limited to just stock suspension. The purpose of modifying your truck is to improve performance and looks. A set of ICON's and 33's on your current truck would take you to the same places, at the same speeds as a ZR2. Don't sell yourself short.

As far as finding your limits, that just takes time. If you are trying to find limits, they will find you, so be careful and push slowly. Make sure you have a friend with you during these outings and get some recovery gear. A kinetic recovery strap and some soft shackles can get you out of most situations. If you're playing in the dunes, a tire deflator and air compressor are a must. 15psi is beyond a night and day difference on sand. Traction boards are useful too, but not an end all.
 

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2020 Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab Short Box LT
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I've taken a number of stock vehicles and a ZR2 S Blazer over a variety of trails. I drove my Collie today on some steep icy mountain roads and an icy canyon. I bought the LT because it was enough truck to do what I need it to do. I know it will see some rough mountain passes but I don't plan on taking it over anything extreme. I've had a lift kit in the past as well as bigger tires. Those won't help my mostly road and highway travels. The biggest mod I plan on will be some more aggressive tires to handle the ice and snow.
 

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Went to Hollister Hills, CA this weekend and while I wasn't doing any blacks, still had a great time. And I have the long bed. The truck is plenty capable, more capable than me as a driver at least.

If I find myself in the truck more than the dirt bikes off road, maybe I'll invest in a lift.
 

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These truck were not made to go off-road. As soon as all four wheels touch dirt, the engine will stop running, you will get a CEL indicator and all four wheels will fall off.

All seriousness, my truck saw 70 miles out of the first 120 miles on service road and trails. Within 40 minutes of leaving the dealer, I was on a trail. Like other have said, take your truck out and start running some dirt road and get a feel for it.
 

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It's great that you're getting out and using your truck to explore and have fun, but you're slipping into that same headspace. You don't need a ZR2 to go fast and have fun. Sure, it comes much better equiped out of the box, but your are not limited to just stock suspension. The purpose of modifying your truck is to improve performance and looks. A set of ICON's and 33's on your current truck would take you to the same places, at the same speeds as a ZR2. Don't sell yourself short.

As far as finding your limits, that just takes time. If you are trying to find limits, they will find you, so be careful and push slowly. Make sure you have a friend with you during these outings and get some recovery gear. A kinetic recovery strap and some soft shackles can get you out of most situations. If you're playing in the dunes, a tire deflator and air compressor are a must. 15psi is beyond a night and day difference on sand. Traction boards are useful too, but not an end all.
Yeah...I’m still chapped because the ZR2 was announced a few months after I bought my truck if I recall the timing but I was too cheap to take a hit and get one a year later (or now). I wish more folks on here got new coil overs so I could get some input. I’m not really interested in much of a lift (maybe an inch) - just want something a little better. I’m thinking Fox 2.0 or 2.5’s up front and 2.0’s in the rear and probably upper control arms. Just waiting for more miles so I can justify pulling the stock suspension off.
 

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Yeah...I’m still chapped because the ZR2 was announced a few months after I bought my truck if I recall the timing but I was too cheap to take a hit and get one a year later (or now). I wish more folks on here got new coil overs so I could get some input. I’m not really interested in much of a lift (maybe an inch) - just want something a little better. I’m thinking Fox 2.0 or 2.5’s up front and 2.0’s in the rear and probably upper control arms. Just waiting for more miles so I can justify pulling the stock suspension off.
I've driven a ton of different setups and I recommend ICON 2.5's with the adjusters. They are the only set that work amazing out of the box. Fox and King are fine too, but can be improved. Both are very linear in their stroke and don't have much bottom out protection, so that is a big downside. The ICONs have a "bump zone" that stiffens the valving near bottom out, to make it feel almost bottomless. And they are adjustable, so an inch of lift can be had with minimal effect on ride. You can hold speed into holes and they just keep going. I would slow down for those holes with Kings. I personally only run Kings because no one else makes ZR2 replacements and I wanted to get away from the DSSV's.
 

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I've driven a ton of different setups and I recommend ICON 2.5's with the adjusters. They are the only set that work amazing out of the box. Fox and King are fine too, but can be improved. Both are very linear in their stroke and don't have much bottom out protection, so that is a big downside. The ICONs have a "bump zone" that stiffens the valving near bottom out, to make it feel almost bottomless. And they are adjustable, so an inch of lift can be had with minimal effect on ride. You can hold speed into holes and they just keep going. I would slow down for those holes with Kings. I personally only run Kings because no one else makes ZR2 replacements and I wanted to get away from the DSSV's.
I’m not 100% on these coilovers for the Colorado application, but in the Jeep world, icons were always built for high speed off road. The kings and fox where always an attempt to blur the lines between daily driving and more technical wheeling, with some resi’s to deal with fade, and they typically accomplished that very well on that application. I’d assume they carry that mentality across the line.

Basically I’m just saying they’re built for different things.


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I just got a new truck recently and I talk about my dilemma in whether my new truck can make it or not on some off road trails.

You’re number 1 thing is tires. Tires will make or break a run, they can turn a 4lo situation into a 2wd walk over.

Number 2 is clearance and travel, this is highly dependent on you’re terrain.

The real number 1 is the driver. You’re going to have to go out and find out. Everyone, and I mean EVERYONE who offroads has been a dumbass at some point and put themselves in a dumb situation. We learn from it. You’ll learn how to push the truck and how not to. The same obstacle with the same vehicle can look real easy with one driver, and impossible with another.


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I’m not 100% on these coilovers for the Colorado application, but in the Jeep world, icons were always built for high speed off road. The kings and fox where always an attempt to blur the lines between daily driving and more technical wheeling, with some resi’s to deal with fade, and they typically accomplished that very well on that application. I’d assume they carry that mentality across the line.

Basically I’m just saying they’re built for different things.


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The guy I was talking to wants to go fast, off road.... I agree, King and Fox are more daily driver friendly, but they both have different characteristics. Fox is generally stiffer. Kings are softer. ICONs are right in the sweet spot with the bottom out protection those other two lack. All have resi's, available compression adjusters(which I recommend) and don't overheat after long runs.
 

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The guy I was talking to wants to go fast, off road.... I agree, King and Fox are more daily driver friendly, but they both have different characteristics. Fox is generally stiffer. Kings are softer. ICONs are right in the sweet spot with the bottom out protection those other two lack. All have resi's, available compression adjusters(which I recommend) and don't overheat after long runs.
You'd likely laugh at my setup. I'm built for Appalachia. It's the opposite of go fast. :(
 
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