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Discussion Starter #21
Most of these trucks have plenty of power for towing, the hybrid supplements to reduce engine demand and reduce fuel consumption. Given the hybrid power will not always be available, and certainly not for long duration situations, I can't see it as increasing actual tow capacity.
But this system is different in that it increases both the total HP and torque available (unlike the Ram eTorque system).

I get though a bit of what you're saying when you say the F-150 engines already have plenty of power. I went with the 4 cyl. Subaru rather than the 6 because I felt that was adequate. People tend to get more powerful vehicles than what they need because that's what the car magazines tell them they need. But for this truck and towing use I was thinking not only of power driving, but also power camping. I've not done the math, but I suspect the 1.5 KW battery would only give you maybe an extra day of 12 volt power if you weren't using much power camping. So both the extra power towing and camping would be nice, but neither is earthshattering.
 

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So what about a system like the volt, that uses an ice motor as a generator for the smaller (then most bev) batteries. That way you get the most out of the batteries in city driving where let’s face the majority of trucks are driven and the ice motor as generator would kick in on long drives or towing where the batteries get depleted faster. What would be better is then let the ice motor power the front wheels when needed so that it could work as a hybrid and a generator?
 

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So what about a system like the volt, that uses an ice motor as a generator for the smaller (then most bev) batteries. That way you get the most out of the batteries in city driving where let’s face the majority of trucks are driven and the ice motor as generator would kick in on long drives or towing where the batteries get depleted faster. What would be better is then let the ice motor power the front wheels when needed so that it could work as a hybrid and a generator?
The Volt actually uses a powersplit device, so the engine can deliver power to the wheels, as well as the emotor.

But more to the point, the biggest problem with range extender hybrids like the Volt is cost. You have an almost BEV with all that entails in terms of cost, and then you still have an ICE. It's too expensive. IMO the ICE powertrains will simply give way to full BEV over the next decade. Hybrids of all various types are all just dead side ends.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Hybrids of all various types are all just dead side ends.
I tend to agree with that too. That's why I mentioned wishing Subaru made a plug-in hybrid--at least for shorter trips that could function as an EV, and we have a lot of short trips and the Duramax for trips that are not short.

But again, for this use I was also thinking about the power camping, a non-issue with most hybrid uses. In the past I've said if I were to go the motorhome/toad route I would consider an EV for the toad, even though that would mean extra weight. The disadvantage to that over this though is you'd need a place eventually to charge the toad.
 

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So what about a system like the volt, that uses an ice motor as a generator for the smaller (then most bev) batteries. That way you get the most out of the batteries in city driving where let’s face the majority of trucks are driven and the ice motor as generator would kick in on long drives or towing where the batteries get depleted faster. What would be better is then let the ice motor power the front wheels when needed so that it could work as a hybrid and a generator?
I am pretty sure we covered this in another thread a while back. While the Volt has an eCVT, it operates mostly as a series hybrid, like a diesel locomotive, where all the propulsion comes from the electric motors.
 

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So you're just being an ass? I'll keep that in mind for the future. Oh wait, no I won't. ;)
Is the term "clickbait" offensive to you? It's just a little elbow, calm down. The main reason why hybrids won't be the end of diesels is this 100 year old diesel hybrid:
399545
 

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Hybrids typically use an eCVT, which works great in my wife's small car, but I am not sure how well that design would work for heavy towing. A quick search yielded the Lincoln Aviator plug in hybrid, it is rated to tow 6,700 pounds. The Lincoln does not use an eCVT and instead uses the 10 normal speed transmission. Car & Driver had this to say about it:

"Lincoln offers a plug-in-hybrid model that's known as the Aviator Grand Touring. Using the same V-6 and 10-speed transmission as the standard Aviator, the Grand Touring adds a 100-hp electric motor and a 13.6-kWh battery. The two propulsion sources combine for 494 horsepower and 630 pound-feet of torque, but the refinement isn't quite up to snuff, with occasional thunks when the driveline reengages the gas engine. The battery allows the plug-in Aviator to cover about 18 miles in the Pure EV driving mode without using the gas engine, but the 118 hp motor is slow to accelerate the Aviator's heft without help from the engine. Most buyers will use one of the alternative drive modes, which rely heavily on the V-6".

Well gee, no kidding a 100 HP electric motor is not going to move that tank by itself. My wife's little C-Max has a 118 HP electric motor and while quick off the line (torque available right now electrics are a kick in the ass from a red light) and completely serviceable and reasonably responsive after that in EV mode, I can't imagine even less than that level of power toting around another 2,000 pounds of leather encrusted luxury SUV. Even in town that Lincoln is gonna be a ponderous dog in EV mode.

In a regular hybrid with an eCVT, the little 4 cylinder engine's starting and stopping is basically unnoticeable in normal driving unless one specifically pays attention. Interesting the Lincoln continues to use the 10 speed transmission, as integrating that with an electric motor has to be tricky. eCVTs are relatively simple things from a mechanical standpoint - that Lincoln has to have one complex power train.
 

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As a currently active diesel engine engineer, I feel a lot like an absolute expert in steam locomotive technology circa 1950. I'm an expert in a field that is about to become irrelevant. BEV's are taking over ground transport. Not gas. Not diesel. Not hybrids. BEV.

That's me, second from left
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Hybrids typically use an eCVT, which works great in my wife's small car, but I am not sure how well that design would work for heavy towing.
This one apparently has the electric motor between the engine and transmission, so it's a standard transmission.
 

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As a currently active diesel engine engineer, I feel a lot like an absolute expert in steam locomotive technology circa 1950. I'm an expert in a field that is about to become irrelevant. BEV's are taking over ground transport. Not gas. Not diesel. Not hybrids. BEV.
Nah, BEV's work great for city life or commuting, not so much for agriculture and industry. Energy density isn't even close to where it needs to be to take over ground transport.
 

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Nah, BEV's work great for city life or commuting, not so much for agriculture and industry. Energy density isn't even close to where it needs to be to take over ground transport.
I cannot relate industry internal information, but I believe if you look at industry public information you will understand why I do not agree. For example, GM has now announced that they plan to offer 30 BEV models by 2025, which will be 40% of their sales. GM is not Tesla, in that they do not make public statements they have no intention of meeting. If GM says they plan something, they do indeed plan it. They might fail, but that is different.
 

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I cannot relate industry internal information, but I believe if you look at industry public information you will understand why I do not agree. For example, GM has now announced that they plan to offer 30 BEV models by 2025, which will be 40% of their sales. GM is not Tesla, in that they do not make public statements they have no intention of meeting. If GM says they plan something, they do indeed plan it. They might fail, but that is different.
Remove the federal subsidies and incentives from the equation. I'm not saying BEV's won't be significant, but I am saying they won't take over any time soon, at least for as long as the mainstream battery tech is lithium-ion.
 
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The government, media, and subsequently the auto manufacturers are gung ho on electric vehicles. So much so they forgot about looking at other alternatives like bio-diesel and hydrogen fuel cels. Maybe our politicians are fully invested in Tesla or getting kickbacks from the battery manufacturers.
 

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That's you in 1942? Are you close to being a centenarian?
This is what is known as a joke, made for the purposes of hyperbole. The point here is, those gentlemen in 1942 were the absolute experts in their field. That locomotive was (while flawed) a legitimate approach to being the ne plus ultra of steam design in 1942. The point again, here, is that all of this was a lost cause. Diesel trains took over the market shortly after this photo and this locomotive went nowhere.

I am, figuratively, the modern version of these gentlemen. I am an expert in a field that is coming to the end.
 

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The government, media, and subsequently the auto manufacturers are gung ho on electric vehicles. So much so they forgot about looking at other alternatives like bio-diesel and hydrogen fuel cels. Maybe our politicians are fully invested in Tesla or getting kickbacks from the battery manufacturers.
Right. None of those options occurred to any of us. Geez, I should probably tell my management that we should look at some of these other options because none of them were ever investigated before.
 
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