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Thought I'd post an update. My last two trips out have both involved one day of somewhat significant winds--20 to 30 mph. I was amazed how little if felt the effects of the wind. Two of the windier locations were the SW Washington coast and the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, but no issues at all. FWIW my trailer is about 21' long, tandem axle and weighs about 4,600 loaded, WDH w/o sway control.
 

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2021 GMC Canyon 3.6L V6 crew cab, short bed
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Goodspike thanks so much for the info. 21', about 4600ibs loaded, and NO sway bars, and it didn't sway in 30mph winds? THAT'S GREAT TO HEAR! I don't have a diesel but even with the 3.6L and 7000 tow compared to your 7700ib tow I feel much better looking at 21', 3200ib empty and up to 5000ib load toy haulers. I am currently in the Smokey's after driving up here on some SUPER windy and SUPER steep, hilly roads, (took a detour to save time and the road was almost scary how I couldn't see the other side of the hill going down) but my truck did ok with the 4'x8' metal U-haul motorcycle trailer and 750ibs Yamaha Raider S with about 300-500ibs of fully load cab and bed of junk to bring on a 12 day cabin motorcycle trip in the Smokey's. The gas mileage has been AWESOME! In town driving mostly grandpaw and every once in a while flooring it I get mostly 17mpg and very rarely 21mph, but so for after 700 miles and 14hrs of driving to get to Sevierville, TN I still have an average, (according to the instrument panel) of 21mph on hilly, windy, roads with an about 1500ib metal trailer, 750ib moto, and maybe 500ibs of junk but I guess it helps being on the interstate and 99% of the time being on cruise control and only 3 stops.
 

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Goodspike thanks so much for the info. 21', about 4600ibs loaded, and NO sway bars, and it didn't sway in 30mph winds? THAT'S GREAT TO HEAR! I don't have a diesel but even with the 3.6L and 7000 tow compared to your 7700ib tow I feel much better looking at 21', 3200ib empty and up to 5000ib load toy haulers.
I don't think the gasser versus diesel would matter, but the toy hauler might. Your tongue weight might be much lower when there's something in the back, and that could make sway more likely. You're probably more likely to need sway control than me.

Any idea what the tongue weight is on that trailer empty? My concern is tongue weight might be relatively high in some situations, particularly if loaded with your normal stuff but no toys. Although I guess the weight of the toys in that is somewhat limited, so maybe the tongue weight isn't that far from normal.
 

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2021 GMC Canyon 3.6L V6 crew cab, short bed
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I don't think the gasser versus diesel would matter, but the toy hauler might. Your tongue weight might be much lower when there's something in the back, and that could make sway more likely. You're probably more likely to need sway control than me.

Any idea what the tongue weight is on that trailer empty? My concern is tongue weight might be relatively high in some situations, particularly if loaded with your normal stuff but no toys. Although I guess the weight of the toys in that is somewhat limited, so maybe the tongue weight isn't that far from normal.
The 3.6L is rated for a tongue weight of 700ibs. Most trailers I am looking at from 16-23', 3200ibs-3700ibs empty are all about 400ibs-550ibs dry tongue weight. The most empty tongue weight I can have is 550ibs max because just my 750ib motorcycle probably adds about 150ibs to the tongue, (20% of 750ibs) because that would get to the 700ibs tongue max weight rating. So I am guessing after I add my 750ib motorcycle and maybe 500ibs(?) for contents it would equal about 1250ibs total added so maybe 15-20% of that would go to the tongue weight so maybe up to about 250ibs added to the 450 tongue weight so yeah it could get the tongue weight very close to the top 700ib tongue limit so I may want to load as much contents as possible in the bed of my truck as I think the 3.6L is rated to haul 1500ibs over the rear axle.

Can anyone confirm the 2021 Canyon/Colorado with the 3.6L can haul up to 1500ibs over the rear axle?
 

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2021 LT 4x4 V6
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The 3.6L is rated for a tongue weight of 700ibs. Most trailers I am looking at from 16-23', 3200ibs-3700ibs empty are all about 400ibs-550ibs dry tongue weight. The most empty tongue weight I can have is 550ibs max because just my 750ib motorcycle probably adds about 150ibs to the tongue, (20% of 750ibs) because that would get to the 700ibs tongue max weight rating. So I am guessing after I add my 750ib motorcycle and maybe 500ibs(?) for contents it would equal about 1250ibs total added so maybe 15-20% of that would go to the tongue weight so maybe up to about 250ibs added to the 450 tongue weight so yeah it could get the tongue weight very close to the top 700ib tongue limit so I may want to load as much contents as possible in the bed of my truck as I think the 3.6L is rated to haul 1500ibs over the rear axle.

Can anyone confirm the 2021 Canyon/Colorado with the 3.6L can haul up to 1500ibs over the rear axle?
  • Hitch: 900lbs tongue (says on the sticker)
  • Payload on my LT V6 4x4 extended cab = 1477
  • GVWR = 5900
  • GAWR front = 3200
  • GAWR rear = 3500
Given the weight distribution of the truck (~57/43), it should be within limits to put the entire payload on the rear axle (minus driver of course).
 

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The 3.6L is rated for a tongue weight of 700ibs. Most trailers I am looking at from 16-23', 3200ibs-3700ibs empty are all about 400ibs-550ibs dry tongue weight. The most empty tongue weight I can have is 550ibs max because just my 750ib motorcycle probably adds about 150ibs to the tongue, (20% of 750ibs) because that would get to the 700ibs tongue max weight rating.
I haven't looked at the trailer, but I was assuming the toys would go in the back, behind the rear axle, and actually reduce the tongue weight when loaded in. I suspect those dry tongue weights are a bit higher than normal trailers of the same weight, and that was basically the question I was asking--what's the tongue weight without the toy in place. That's not as high as I thought it might be, but those trailers are probably not designed to carry at much as some toyhaulers.

FYI, this was just my curiosity. I've never really looked into toyhaulers.
 

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The 3.6L is rated for a tongue weight of 700ibs. Most trailers I am looking at from 16-23', 3200ibs-3700ibs empty are all about 400ibs-550ibs dry tongue weight. The most empty tongue weight I can have is 550ibs max because just my 750ib motorcycle probably adds about 150ibs to the tongue, (20% of 750ibs) because that would get to the 700ibs tongue max weight rating. So I am guessing after I add my 750ib motorcycle and maybe 500ibs(?) for contents it would equal about 1250ibs total added so maybe 15-20% of that would go to the tongue weight so maybe up to about 250ibs added to the 450 tongue weight so yeah it could get the tongue weight very close to the top 700ib tongue limit so I may want to load as much contents as possible in the bed of my truck as I think the 3.6L is rated to haul 1500ibs over the rear axle.

Can anyone confirm the 2021 Canyon/Colorado with the 3.6L can haul up to 1500ibs over the rear axle?
The payload capacity is for the entire truck, not just the bed or what the rear axle can carry. If you were to put 1500LB on the rear axle via tongue weight and stuff in the bed then you'd be over RAWR. The payload capacity is the difference between the GVWR and curb weight as it left the factory. So your weight as the driver takes away from remaining payload, any other people take away from it, any gear you toss into the back seat take away from it, etc.

So no, the rear axle can't take 1,500LB of payload. That would put your truck over RAWR and likely GVWR once you hopped into the drivers seat.

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The payload capacity is for the entire truck, not just the bed or what the rear axle can carry. If you were to put 1500LB on the rear axle via tongue weight and stuff in the bed then you'd be over RAWR. The payload capacity is the difference between the GVWR and curb weight as it left the factory. So your weight as the driver takes away from remaining payload, any other people take away from it, any gear you toss into the back seat take away from it, etc.

So no, the rear axle can't take 1,500LB of payload. That would put your truck over RAWR and likely GVWR once you hopped into the drivers seat.

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Beyond that though, I'm not sure how many Colorados have a payload of 1,500. Mine doesn't, so even if I hadn't added aftermarket accessories and didn't take anything/anyone else with me, it couldn't carry 1,500 pounds, no matter how you distributed the weight.

But the question was asking about trailers and weight over the axle. A WDH would transfer part of the weight from a trailer to the front axle, which would still count against payload but reduce rear axle weight, and part to the trailer axle(s), which wouldn't count against payload. So that would allow a bit more in the bed, but still not allow 1,500 over the rear axle.

Going back and reading that answer though I had assumed that the bike was going in the toyhauler trailer. Now I'm not so sure. I cringe every time I see heavy things loaded into beds while pulling trailers. My last time out there was a truck that had two moped type devices in the bed and a third on the ground--not sure where it travelled, connected to maybe a 23-25' tandem axle trailer. Even worse, there was a similar setup where the item in the bed was a moderately sized slide in camper. Overall though I didn't see any obvious huge mismatches, although it's sometimes hard to tell with 1/2 tons. The most questionable one was a BMW towing, but I have no idea what they can tow/carry.
 

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Beyond that though, I'm not sure how many Colorados have a payload of 1,500. Mine doesn't, so even if I hadn't added aftermarket accessories and didn't take anything/anyone else with me, it couldn't carry 1,500 pounds, no matter how you distributed the weight.

But the question was asking about trailers and weight over the axle. A WDH would transfer part of the weight from a trailer to the front axle, which would still count against payload but reduce rear axle weight, and part to the trailer axle(s), which wouldn't count against payload. So that would allow a bit more in the bed, but still not allow 1,500 over the rear axle.

Going back and reading that answer though I had assumed that the bike was going in the toyhauler trailer. Now I'm not so sure. I cringe every time I see heavy things loaded into beds while pulling trailers. My last time out there was a truck that had two moped type devices in the bed and a third on the ground--not sure where it travelled, connected to maybe a 23-25' tandem axle trailer. Even worse, there was a similar setup where the item in the bed was a moderately sized slide in camper. Overall though I didn't see any obvious huge mismatches, although it's sometimes hard to tell with 1/2 tons. The most questionable one was a BMW towing, but I have no idea what they can tow/carry.
Base trims with no options can have a payload capacity of just over 1,500LB.

Fact remains, though, that "payload capacity" isn't and never has been "bed capacity" or "what you can load over the rear axle" and isn't separate from "people and gear" in the cab. A lot of people simply have no idea what the weight capacities are or what they even mean, make bad assumptions, and then end up overloaded and wondering why the truck isn't riding or performing well, call the truck "crap" because they don't think they've overloaded the truck based on what they think the limits are, etc.

Or people just don't care to understand weight limits.

Or...

Anyone that thinks they can put 1,500LB over the rear axle via hitch weight and stuff in the bed is going to have a bad time.
 

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2021 GMC Canyon AT4
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It’s too hard.
I place a lot of blame on the manufacturers, who focus on max tow in their advertising.

On the other hand, GM has moved to some really nice stickers which give a lot of weight limit information about each truck.
 

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Fact remains, though, that "payload capacity" isn't and never has been "bed capacity" or "what you can load over the rear axle" and isn't separate from "people and gear" in the cab. . . .

Anyone that thinks they can put 1,500LB over the rear axle via hitch weight and stuff in the bed is going to have a bad time.
I did a Cat Scale weigh of truck only, with the stuff I normally carry when traveling, including the two cats. My rear axle was 980 pounds under the 3,500 limit. Probably without the cats I could do 1,000 in the bed if loaded properly, but that would probably put me over GVWR.
 

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2019 Colorado CCLB Z71 V6 4WD
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Base trims with no options can have a payload capacity of just over 1,500LB.

Fact remains, though, that "payload capacity" isn't and never has been "bed capacity" or "what you can load over the rear axle" and isn't separate from "people and gear" in the cab. A lot of people simply have no idea what the weight capacities are or what they even mean, make bad assumptions, and then end up overloaded and wondering why the truck isn't riding or performing well, call the truck "crap" because they don't think they've overloaded the truck based on what they think the limits are, etc.

Or people just don't care to understand weight limits.

Or...

Anyone that thinks they can put 1,500LB over the rear axle via hitch weight and stuff in the bed is going to have a bad time.
I had an instance where I knew I over loaded it... 1500lbs of block in the bed plus ~ 650 lbs of tongue weight on a 6800lb trailer... Would I have taken it off the job site? no. Did it do it on a closed service road between sites? yes. Would I do it again if I didn't absolutely have to or had to go on a public roadway? Not a chance in hell will I ever again come close.
 

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I place a lot of blame on the manufacturers, who focus on max tow in their advertising.

On the other hand, GM has moved to some really nice stickers which give a lot of weight limit information about each truck.
Yes, it may also be a situation of what's theoretically possible given the weight limits vs. what's advisable from an actual use and experience perspective.

As a thought experiment using the limits on the sticker for my V6 LT 4x4:
  • Payload: 1477
  • GVWR: 5900
  • GAWR front: 3200
  • GAWR rear: 3500
Extrapolating: 5900 - 1477 = 4423 empty weight
57/43 weight distribution = 2521 front axle, 1902 rear axle
Assume 200 driver split equally btw axles and rounding a bit:
2620 front, 2000 rear

The first contradiction is that the total combined GAWR > GVWR: 3200+3500 = 6700 > 5900
The second is that GAWR rear - rear empty weight > payload: 3500 - 2000 = 1500 > 1477

In this case, one could theoretically put 1477 - 200 = 1277 in the bed and be within the limit of the truck.
 

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The first contradiction is that the total combined GAWR > GVWR: 3200+3500 = 6700 > 5900
The second is that GAWR rear - rear empty weight > payload: 3500 - 2000 = 1500 > 1477
I don't see how the first is a contradiction because the weight added won't necessarily add exactly the same proportion of weight to the front and rear as the unloaded proportion. Unless that were the case it would be almost impossible to get to GVWR without exceeding one of the two axle limits. You need to have extra capacity front and rear. Also the frame could be the weak link. To use an analogy, if you had a tandem axle trailer with two 2,500 axles and a 5,000 pound GVWR, it wouldn't necessarily increase the weight limit to 7,000 pounds if you changed out to 3,500 pound axles.

As to the second, some of the weight in the bed would go to the front axle, assuming evenly loaded, but that's probably minimal given how little bed area there is on most of these trucks that is front of the axle. And that's probably the biggest problem when it comes to carrying load in the bed. A more traditional (or older) truck would have a bed that is better centered over the axle. To me that means these trucks aren't really designed to carry a lot of weight in the bed. The payload is more for passengers and tongue weight, and using 85% plus of available payload for hauling something in the bed would likely be problematic.
 

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GVWR being less than the sum of FAWR + RAWR is nothing new. GVWR is based on more than just suspension/axle capacity but also has to meet braking and acceleration requirements, etc. FAWR and RAWR are literally just what the front and rear axle are rated for, GVWR takes a lot more into consideration.
 
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True. On page 227 of the manual for MY2021, the max trailer tongue weight is listed as 770lbs.
That's interesting, on page 275 of my 2017 manual (Canada), the max tongue weight is listed as 408kg (900lbs) which matches the sticker on the hitch.
 

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