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Hi All,
I have a 2018 Colorado V6 4x4 with factory tow package and brake controller.

I am looking for some suggestions.
New to towing and looking for a camper with bunks (for grand kids). I really feel that a dual axle trailer would be the way to go from a towing and safety perspective. I understand that they feel much more 'planted' on the road. I would also invest in a WDH with anti-sway.
I may be interested in the Jay Feather 20BH model with a gross weight rating of 5500lbs and is 24ft in length. However, inputting details into a Towing Capacity Worksheet indicates that this weight/model would be absolutely at the max weight for the Colorado with very little safety room built in.
I have looked around at a bunch of sights for dual axle BH's, but most seem to weigh more than this one.
Has anyone here owned and towed this model? If so, how was it? Does anyone have any other suggestions and experience with other models?
Any help would be very much appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I may be interested in the Jay Feather 20BH model with a gross weight rating of 5500lbs and is 24ft in length. However, inputting details into a Towing Capacity Worksheet indicates that this weight/model would be absolutely at the max weight for the Colorado with very little safety room built in.
That has an empty weight of about 4,400 pounds. My Winnebago 2106DS in constrast is about 400-500 pounds less, and it is really close on payload with my wife and cat in the truck. Payload is the main limiting factor, although each axle is also within about 300 pounds. And that's carrying very little water. Oh, and mine is a diesel--I don't remember how that impacts available payload.

BTW, giving the gross weight rating is not really that useful. My 2006DS has a gross weight rating of 7,000 pounds, but I'd have a really tough time getting it to weigh that much. The expected loaded weight is much more useful.
 

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BTW, giving the gross weight rating is not really that useful. My 2006DS has a gross weight rating of 7,000 pounds, but I'd have a really tough time getting it to weigh that much. The expected loaded weight is much more useful.
Your 2106DS is the exception to the rule, in the vast majority of cases using GVWR is recommended vs dry weight because dry weight is basically useless and you have no idea what options are actually included/excluded in that weight. Short of looking at the payload sticker on a specific trailer, GVWR is a better number to consider when trying to determine if it's going to be too much trailer.

Case in point, the Jay Feather 20BH they're looking at only has ~1,200LB of payload capacity. Our trailer listed a dry weight of 4,311LB with a cargo capacity of 1,233LB. Loaded and ready to go AFTER putting it on a diet it weighs pretty much 5,000LB on the button, so 600LB over the listed dry weight without even trying hard. No water in the tanks, either. That Jayco doesn't appear to be as hitch heavy as our trailer, but that can change drastically based on cargo loading.

The V6 trucks have 200LB less GVWR (6,000 vs 6,200) and 700LB less GCWR (12,000 vs 12,700) compared to the diesel trucks. Payload capacity between gas and diesel should be pretty similar, all else being equal.
 

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Your 2106DS is the exception to the rule, in the vast majority of cases using GVWR is recommended vs dry weight because dry weight is basically useless and you have no idea what options are actually included/excluded in that weight. Short of looking at the payload sticker on a specific trailer, GVWR is a better number to consider when trying to determine if it's going to be too much trailer.
I'd rather work from dry weight and then add in the stuff I'm planning to add/carry. That has the added advantage of making sure you're not likely to be in a situation down the road where you'd go above the trailer's GVWR (although not an issue with my trailer). There was one trailer I looked at where it seemed as if you'd go over its GVWR if you put even 500 pounds in it! Just looking at the GVWR of the trailer beforehand you might not instantly realize that.

Also, you do know what options are included if you work off the dry weight specific to the trailer, unless the dealer added something. I was using the published weight of the trailer in my first post today, but the specific weight could be plus or minus 100 or so pounds.

The V6 trucks have 200LB less GVWR (6,000 vs 6,200) and 700LB less GCWR (12,000 vs 12,700) compared to the diesel trucks. Payload capacity between gas and diesel should be pretty similar, all else being equal.
I was thinking also about the difference in engine/transmission weight. I don't remember which is heavier and by how much.
 

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I'd rather work from dry weight and then add in the stuff I'm planning to add/carry. That has the added advantage of making sure you're not likely to be in a situation down the road where you'd go above the trailer's GVWR (although not an issue with my trailer). There was one trailer I looked at where it seemed as if you'd go over its GVWR if you put even 500 pounds in it! Just looking at the GVWR of the trailer beforehand you might not instantly realize that.

Also, you do know what options are included if you work off the dry weight specific to the trailer, unless the dealer added something. I was using the published weight of the trailer in my first post today, but the specific weight could be plus or minus 100 or so pounds.
It's often times quite a bit more than 100lb for the following reasons:
  • The brochure numbers are for the base trailer and don't include required options or upgrades.
  • The dry weight doesn't include LP tanks or batteries.
For example, the dry weight listed for my actual trailer on the sticker is 4,380LB, 69LB more than the brochure weight. Not including LP tanks or batteries. Full LP tanks are another 37LB x 2 = 74LB. A group 27 12v deep cycle battery is ~50LB. If you have two then that's 100LB, but I only have one.

So, in reality my trailer is almost 200LB more than the listed dry weight in the brochure. Add a typical WDH and that's another 75-100LB, so 275-300LB more than the listed dry weight before adding any gear, food, etc.

Going by dry weights and then having to load gingerly is not fun. If you don't want to go by your GVWR then at the very least I would tack on 1,200LB to the listed dry weight so you have a buffer and then also figure 12% of that weight on the tongue.

Going by dry weight is how most people end up way overweight without knowing it.
 

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Not including LP tanks or batteries. Full LP tanks are another 37LB x 2 = 74LB. A group 27 12v deep cycle battery is ~50LB. If you have two then that's 100LB, but I only have one. Add a typical WDH and that's another 75-100LB, so 275-300LB more than the listed dry weight before adding any gear, food, etc.
I consider those things I plan to carry and added to the dry weight. I'll even add in a minimal amount of water since I will have the water heater full and have a few gallons extra just in case.

The best though would be to actually weigh the trailer with at least batteries and propane, but that's hard to do before you purchase.
 

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2018 Chevy Colorado ZR2
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Hi All,
I have a 2018 Colorado V6 4x4 with factory tow package and brake controller.

I am looking for some suggestions.
New to towing and looking for a camper with bunks (for grand kids). I really feel that a dual axle trailer would be the way to go from a towing and safety perspective. I understand that they feel much more 'planted' on the road. I would also invest in a WDH with anti-sway.
I may be interested in the Jay Feather 20BH model with a gross weight rating of 5500lbs and is 24ft in length. However, inputting details into a Towing Capacity Worksheet indicates that this weight/model would be absolutely at the max weight for the Colorado with very little safety room built in.
I have looked around at a bunch of sights for dual axle BH's, but most seem to weigh more than this one.
Has anyone here owned and towed this model? If so, how was it? Does anyone have any other suggestions and experience with other models?
Any help would be very much appreciated. Thanks!
Your towing capasity depends on what model you own...
I owned a 2016 Colorado Z71 extended cab equipped with a 3.6l v-6 which had a 7,000 lb towind cap...
I traded it in on a 2018 Colorado ZR2 which dropped the towing cap to 5,000lbs ... (The suspension for a true "offroad model, ie;(ZR2... )will ,most always be less because the suspension, to be effective off road has to be softer...) otherwise you're bouncing too much ,when into serious offroading...loss of control...
Just my take...
But if your model is any other than the ZR2 you should have 7,000 lbs tow cap.(Powered with a 3.6.)
Hope this helps...
 

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Finally got to pick up my NuCamp 320s last week that I bought last December! The RV dealership agreed to store it for me until spring. (they're about 3 hours away) What with one thing or another it took me a while to get it. I like it really well so far. Truck tows it easily of course, it only weights 2,000 pounds. Don't have a weight distribution or sway control stuff-don't feel like I need it. Just a 2" drop draw bar and a Curt Echo brake controller and off I go! I towed it about 30 miles on rolling 55mpg highway the weekend I picked it up and camped for a few days. Got 17mpg. On the way home at 65ish on the freeway, with the A/C on (hey it was 88 degrees) I only got 14.5mpg but I can live with that. I'll bet it would do better with the A/C off. Hopefully I'll get to try that someday soon.
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I have a 2019 WT, 2.5L, 2wd running on Eibach pro truck lift kit. I want to look into getting a Coachman Viking trailer for my family. It’s about 3,000 lbs dry weight and 3,850 GVWR.

I do not know anything about towing but would this trailer absolutely destroy my truck or would the trailer alone just max me out?
 

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I have a 2019 WT, 2.5L, 2wd running on Eibach pro truck lift kit. I want to look into getting a Coachman Viking trailer for my family. It’s about 3,000 lbs dry weight and 3,850 GVWR.

I do not know anything about towing but would this trailer absolutely destroy my truck or would the trailer alone just max me out?
You would almost certainly be over the towing capacity, and pushing the GVWR of your Colorado. Remember that your GVWR includes tongue weight, passengers, equipment, etc. The only way I could see this possibly working is if a) the rest of your family rode in a separate vehicle, and you have most of the equipment in that vehicle, and b) you won't ever tow in hills or mountains. Even then, I wouldn't do it. You should either upgrade your tow vehicle, or invest in a good tent!
 

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You would almost certainly be over the towing capacity, and pushing the GVWR of your Colorado. Remember that your GVWR includes tongue weight, passengers, equipment, etc. The only way I could see this possibly working is if a) the rest of your family rode in a separate vehicle, and you have most of the equipment in that vehicle, and b) you won't ever tow in hills or mountains. Even then, I wouldn't do it. You should either upgrade your tow vehicle, or invest in a good tent!
darn. I guess I’ll settle for a bed tent instead for now. I’m 2 years into my rig, so maybe next year I’ll look into a diesel 4x4.
 

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Towed home a Mazda Miata that my kid bought. Combined weight of the trailer and car was around 4000lb. Like it wasn't even back there. I have the Curt Spectrum brake controller. Seemed to work really good. Better than the low end one I had in my Sierra.
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I and my family love to go camping and travel, so we often tow a 21dk shamrock on every trip with the 2013 Chevy Silverado 1500
 

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I and my family love to go camping and travel, so we often tow a 21dk shamrock on every trip with the 2013 Chevy Silverado 1500
I think you got lost on your way to the Silverado forums...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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First trip out this year with my vintage Boler camper. 6 years ago I bought the trailer with some cracks in the fiberglass shell and a terrible paint job. I took a few months and stripped it to the shell, inside and out, and did a complete resto-mod on it. As you can imagine, it's a pretty easy tow at only 13ft long from hitch to bumper.
I went
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to a nearby Provincial Park with two of the kids and did some biking and kayaking.
 

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Just 4000lbs of fun. :)
 
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