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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone out there installed a transmission fluid bypass filter on the GM 6L50 transmission? I have a 2017 2.8L Diesel 2WD and a GM 6L50 transmission. I am working with a name brand AM filter kit distributor for oil bypass filtration that is developing a kit for transmission bypass filtration for the GM 6L50 for the 2.8L Duramax. We feel that we are most of the way to having the parts together for a field test; but, would VERY MUCH like input from anyone that has or is doing a transmission fluid bypass filtration system on their GM 6L50 transmission

Thanks in Advance!
 

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Why would you want to do that?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Why would you want to do that?
To filter out contamination from the transmission fluid so that the hydraulic circuits have pure, clean, fluid with which to work. The idea that there are metal fines flowing through my transmission like a hot liquid lapping compound is more than a little unsettling. I would be concerned if I dropped an engine oil pan and found metal metal fines in the pan for the engine. The replacement of an automatic transmission is nearly as expensive as an engine. With transmission fluid being asked to do so very much, I would like to filter out the contaminants that lead to transmission problems before I have transmission problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You know there is a filter in the transmission right? You will do more harm than good as well as void the warranty. It's not like there are reliability issues with these transmissions anyways.
You know that the internal filter does not filter out contaminants or metal fines from the transmission fluid right? You assert that I will do more harm than good and that i will void the warranty by introducking bypass oil filtration to the GM 6L50. Do you have the same opinion of AM, inline transmission and power steering filters that have been on the market for years and that have been proven to filter contaminants to levels below those that are proven to damage automatic transmissions? I’m curious do you also hold these views on bypass engine oil filtration which has been proven effective for more than 50 years? Allison transmissions come with external filters. Have you ever wondered why that is? As for voiding the warranty, why do you believe that bypass filtration that takes a tiny percentage of the fluid flow and filters it through a 2 micron filter and returns the approx 1-2 gpm bypass fluid to the transmission dipstick fill/plug hole will void my warranty? Upon what do basis do you believe this?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This feels like a solution in search of a problem.
-MIke
Not really. It is a solution to the problem of metallic and non-metallic fines in transmission fluid. How long do you believe a transmission might last if you could filter out contaminants 2 microns or larger and change an external filter rather than an internal filter say every 30-50K miles rather than an internal screen that is not designed to filter out anything other than rather large particles in a highly sophisticated hydraulic system? Plus, the hydraulic circuit I intend to use is currently a test plug. If the bypass filter does plug up, the normal hydraulic circuits will not be interrupted. I really like this transmission and I would like to keep it for at least as long as I used to keep my manual transmissions which was pretty much always between 200 - 300K miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My feelings as well. If there was a known issue, then I would applaud the OP's efforts but to my knowledge such is not the case.
To each their own. I am not going to debate the benefits of having clean hydraulic fluid in a hydraulic system further. This was neither the intent of my post nor was it my original “ask”. There is plenty of direct evidence of the benefits of filtering rather than just screening hydraulic fluid for chunks. I am seeking information on HOW and not WHY to filter hydraulic fluid in the GM 6L50. Thanks for taking the time.
 

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To each their own. I am not going to debate the benefits of having clean hydraulic fluid in a hydraulic system further. This was neither the intent of my post nor was it my original “ask”. There is plenty of direct evidence of the benefits of filtering rather than just screening hydraulic fluid for chunks. I am seeking information on HOW and not WHY to filter hydraulic fluid in the GM 6L50. Thanks for taking the time.
My 5+ years here has not seen anybody do this, so you're pioneering. Auxiliary cooling yes, filtering no. Having had 3 vehicles with this trans, the only issue encountered has been shift programming.
Now the 6L80/90 crowd, this may be a different story, given their failure complaints.
 

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To each their own. I am not going to debate the benefits of having clean hydraulic fluid in a hydraulic system further. This was neither the intent of my post nor was it my original “ask”. There is plenty of direct evidence of the benefits of filtering rather than just screening hydraulic fluid for chunks.
Well there is plenty of direct evidence of the benefits of clean air too, but that does not mean that adding filters to your forced air heating system won't damage your furnace.

To the extent you're worried about metal fragments, perhaps a magnetic system would be better.
 

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It is too bad that transmissions don't commonly have drain plugs and God fearing external spin on filters. You have to step up to the big boy Allisons to get the spin on feature.
 

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I'm interested. Haven't done it, but my worldview comes from nearly exclusively driving classic cars. I think about the 500K mile maintenance schedule. It'll take me decades to get there, but I'd prefer to preserve the option.

Also, bypass filtration has been in use since at least the 1930s in applications I can think of directly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well there is plenty of direct evidence of the benefits of clean air too, but that does not mean that adding filters to your forced air heating system won't damage your furnace.

To the extent you're worried about metal fragments, perhaps a magnetic system would be better.
Not an accurate analogy, friend. The blower motor in a forced air system is VERY often filtered to incredibly fine levels to extend the comfort and lives of the humans breathing the air, reducing sickness, allergies, and airborne pathogens. Also, the more contaminants filtered out of a forced air system and the cleaner the air the longer lasting the electrical and mechanical components in a forced air system. I've had AC/R mechs review the forced air system in my home and after nearly 20 years in a dry, dusty environment, EVERYTHING is still in like new condition, my ducts are clean, my blower motor not gunned up or burned out. To extend your analogy though, because of a lung condition and the frequency of brush fires where I live, I introduced HEPA air filtration to my home. This would extend your analogy more accurately to bypass filtering as the HEPA filters take a portion of the air, purify it to hospital-grade purity. As a result, I have saved myself and my healthcare providers many thousands of dollars in medication and treatment of my lung condition. Also, I get sick far less frequently. I am not looking to debate you. If you have helpful information to add to this thread, I very much welcome your input. If not, we need not trade non-sequiturs. All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm interested. Haven't done it, but my worldview comes from nearly exclusively driving classic cars. I think about the 500K mile maintenance schedule. It'll take me decades to get there, but I'd prefer to preserve the option.

Also, bypass filtration has been in use since at least the 1930s in applications I can think of directly.
Thanks! I came across the opportunity quite by chance. I was looking for a bypass filter system for my engine oil after learning that while modern pollution controls make for more breathable air, modern pollution controls also introduce significantly more oil contamination. For me, defeating pollution controls is not something I want to do. I want to preserve the purity of my fluids and use fluid analysis to keep this vehicle running like the day I brought it home from the dealership. While talking to the company where I purchased my engine oil bypass filtration system, I lamented that nearly 30 years after my first automatic transmission filters for transmissions in civilian/personal vehicles were still little more than screens. Turns out that the transmissions that seem to last forever all have external filters, Allison etc. The bypass filter company then mentioned that their filters were designed to filter both engine oil and transmission fluid. The tech also mentioned that they were actively working with a local college on bypass filtration kits for modern transmissions and would welcome an opportunity to help me filter my transmission fluid using a pressure tap on the transmission and an external filter. With the circuit being one that is in a normally plugged condition (test plug) and the return point being a non-pressure point (dipstick hole) leading back to the pan, this really seemed like a viable opportunity to perhaps once and finally keep a wonderful transmission for at least as long as I have kept my manual transmissions if not for a lifetime, mine not GM's warranty period.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It is too bad that transmissions don't commonly have drain plugs and God fearing external spin on filters. You have to step up to the big boy Allisons to get the spin on feature.
Yeah. I was somewhat drooling over the Allisons with the spin-on filters. It makes sooo much sense to at least have a spin-on filter like the Allisons for such a complex hydraulic system. They also include magnets now. <sigh> My drain plug really isn't a drain plug now that you mention it. Pull the plug and it may drain a little excess fluid; but, now, these things are really designed as a sort of spill over gage used to both fill (via special tool) and to check fluid levels once checked by a simple tube and stick. If I have to live with a largely "sealed" (from the owner) transmission, I would like a relatively inexpensive means of keeping my hydraulic fluid and internals clean and long lived. I guess we are expected to just keep buying and rebuying equipment to fund auto manufacturing R&D. When my first car cost less than $1,000.00 and a rebuilt tranny cost $300.00, no big deal. I would just drop one tranny and pop in another. When a mid-sized pickup can cost upwards of $40K, much bigger deal making external bypass filtration much more affordable than repurchasing a $$$ limited life transmission whose service life was cut short by contaminated fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My 5+ years here has not seen anybody do this, so you're pioneering. Auxiliary cooling yes, filtering no. Having had 3 vehicles with this trans, the only issue encountered has been shift programming.
Now the 6L80/90 crowd, this may be a different story, given their failure complaints.
Thanks! This is the first automatic transmission that I truly like and almost love. I want to keep it for a VERY long time. I am also not looking to "shade tree" the system which is why I was looking for professionally developed kits and filters designed to filter hydraulic fluid. In nearly 1 million miles of driving, every mechanical failure of every engine and transmission I've owned has been related to fluid contamination in one way or another. I keep my vehicles on average 13 years or more. Once I realized the engine and transmission in my Colorado diesel were an EXCELLENT pairing I wanted to keep my engine and transmission together as long as mechanically possible. Rather than looking to resolve known issues, I am looking to prevent issues from arising or at least push wear and contamination issue as far into the future as possible. The cost of installing a bypass filtration system is a tiny fraction of the cost of new or rebuilt equipment. My thinking is that once you know you have a great engine, transmission, truck combination like the Colorado diesel, why not take out a little mechanical "life insurance". We do it for other family members who are often far less reliable than our trucks. ;->>
 

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The transmissions I’ve noticed last the longest were the ones left alone and no fluid changes. Go figure
 

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Not an accurate analogy, friend. The blower motor in a forced air system is VERY often filtered to incredibly fine levels to extend the comfort and lives of the humans breathing the air, reducing sickness, allergies, and airborne pathogens. Also, the more contaminants filtered out of a forced air system and the cleaner the air the longer lasting the electrical and mechanical components in a forced air system.
Actually it is an accurate analogy. The furnace has to be designed for the filter.


But beyond what they're describing, I often see owners install a second filter. That really creates unknowns because you have no idea of the total restriction on the system.

You can create similar problems by shutting down too many vents in the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Actually it is an accurate analogy. The furnace has to be designed for the filter.


But beyond what they're describing, I often see owners install a second filter. That really creates unknowns because you have no idea of the total restriction on the system.

You can create similar problems by shutting down too many vents in the house.
Friend, why is it you think the Allisons have true external filter? You seem to assume that I am restricting hydraulic circuits that I am not restricting. I am using a blocked circuit (pressure test plug) and not a cooling line send/return line. Also, I am returning to an unused, non-pressure point in the system. Finally, your furnace analogy assumes my restricting the intake of the blower and/or somehow restricting or blocking the output. Neither of these straw-man arguments apply here. Again, if you have useful information pertinent to the reason I opened this thread, I am happy to see it. If not, please just move on to another thread. Many thanks.
 
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