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Granted, for plastic recovery boards. But they do make bridging ladders that in fact do support the weight of a vehicle. Aluminum. They handle up to 7000 lbs per axle !

Made by Crux Offroad.
I'm aware of those, but let's be honest here, no one brings ramps with them. The need is even less than Maxtrax.

If you are really needing to bridge a gap, you shouldn't. The trail needs to be repaired, not potentially damaged further. If one section is washed out, there's a good chance more are. That's definitely a "turn around, don't drown" type situation.

With adequate "track building" and normal traction boards, you can get up some pretty tall ledges. Just takes time, or a more capable truck. 馃槀
 

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2020 ZR2 dbcb
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When I was a younger man, we鈥檇 use 2x6s with bottle caps nailed to them. Sure, you鈥檇 have to drink more pop after every use so you could replace the ones that were bent up and slicked down but that was my budget at the time.


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This sounds like a good investment as much beer as i drink.
 

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I would do caps on one side and cleats on the other for the dirt
 

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2019 GMC Canyon CC 4X4, 2020 Chevy Z71 CC 2WD
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I have MaxTrax and have only used them once. The shoulder of the trail I was on gave out and I sank the right side. Wet, muddy MaxTrax are useless. Maybe with a more aggressive tire with bigger cleats it would have grabbed the boards, but my Geolandar AT's couldn't hook up on them. I have a set of generic short boards as well. Same story. Wound up winching out with a 18 wheeler type ratchet strap and come a long. I have a winch and 140 feet of rope and straps now. The MaxTrax may work better in sand and for gaps, but for mud and water they suck!
 

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I think muputrax are way better than this plastic crapola. And they're cheaper. I got a set of similar fiberglass tracks from a land rover distributor for about $100. They don't melt from traction loss, and if you were to make them from scratch, you could make them longer. If only they came with the spokeswoman! I'll be her knight in shining armor!
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I think muputrax are way better than this plastic crapola. And they're cheaper. I got a set of similar fiberglass tracks from a land rover distributor for about $100. They don't melt from traction loss, and if you were to make them from scratch, you could make them longer. If only they came with the spokeswoman! I'll be her knight in shining armor!
I鈥檓 digging that tiffany blue color option. That one would make me feel rich.


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There is obviously a time and a place for the use of every tool. This is true if you are changing a tire or you are recovering a vehicle.
'Sand Ladders' and the like have been used since the inception of the wheel; recovery boards are really no different in concept.

Being geared predominantly for self recovery when other, better options are exhausted, they are certainly not going to be the appropriate go-to for most situations, especially in recreational off-roading where people typically travel in groups or are on well established trail systems with others about. However, they have a place and serve a purpose if used appropriate to the task - even if rarely used, they are good insurance.

Personally, when it comes to recovery equipment, I'll spend what I can for the best equipment that I can afford. I'm very much of the 'buy once, cry once' mindset in this regard. I have matrix for this reason, and wouldn't recommend anything other then them or maybe the ARB ones. I've only used them in the snow, and on three occasions. One where spinning and sliding was an option to gain momentum, but would have most likely ended up with body damage due to sliding into trees, one where winching was overly complicated due to vehicle placement, and one on a solo trip where there were no suitable deadman anchor points for winching.
 

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I will say, MaxTrax are definitely better in the snow, though. I've personally used a few other brands and they get stiff and brittle in cold temps.
So if that's the premium cost, so be it. Totally agree with @Beltfed it justifies it for me to buy once cry once. If you're in regions less cold, sure, go with the cheaper ones. They will perform approximately the same I guess.
 
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