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Are you using a GCWR of 10,700 for your calculation?
No, I was using my LT, which has a 12,700 GCWR. I didn't want to look up the ZR2's numbers, nor do I know what they typically weigh.

Beyond that though, I'm also talking about vehicles other than the Colorado, which is why I mentioned the Subaru. And I mention that vehicle because someone on another forum was talking about towing a trailer slightly larger than mine with a Subaru Ascent because it has a 5,000 pound max tow rating. I haven't tried to find out what the other limits are on the Subaru, but I suspect that vehicle would be overweight on something or other.
 

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And I mention that vehicle because someone on another forum was talking about towing a trailer slightly larger than mine with a Subaru Ascent because it has a 5,000 pound max tow rating. I haven't tried to find out what the other limits are on the Subaru, but I suspect that vehicle would be overweight on something or other.
SUVs (and SUV-like vehicles) are a whole different animal in a number of ways, but something to keep in mind is that they can often have just as much or more payload capacity as a comparably-sized and classed pickup because it's needed for people and cargo capacity. The payload capacity of a Subaru Ascent appears to max out at almost 1,600LB. That's needed because they can seat up to 8 people.

Assuming 8 people and an average of 175LB per person that's 1,400LB of people. They couldn't sell a vehicle with 8 seats if it didn't have the payload to carry 8 people.

The problem then is that people think "OH! I can take 8 people camping with our 5,000LB trailer!" or "I can take the family and load up the back and tow our trailer!" and then you see these SUVs rolling down the freeway, nose high, dragging ass, and the driver looking like 馃槯 while they have an awful towing experience due to not knowing anything about actual weights and limits.

I like how GM is adding a sticker that lists ALL weight capacities on trucks now. Payload, max tow for that actual truck, etc. That's quite helpful, but only if people know it's there and don't just blindly listen to the max tow rating claims.
 

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The problem then is that people think "OH! I can take 8 people camping with our 5,000LB trailer!" or "I can take the family and load up the back and tow our trailer!" and then you see these SUVs rolling down the freeway, nose high, dragging ass, and the driver looking like 馃槯 while they have an awful towing experience due to not knowing anything about actual weights and limits.

I like how GM is adding a sticker that lists ALL weight capacities on trucks now. Payload, max tow for that actual truck, etc. That's quite helpful, but only if people know it's there and don't just blindly listen to the max tow rating claims.
Yes, and I don't remember for certain the family that Ascent owner had. I think it might have been H, W and two kids about 8-10, but I don't remember. That would be problematic for our trucks.

And yes, that new GM sticker is nice, from what I've heard! I haven't looked at one in person yet.
 

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So in other words [whatever words I want to insert here that have absolutely nothing to do what what you have said].

Out of curiosity, how long have you been functionally illiterate. :rolleyes:
So in other words [whatever words I want to insert here that have absolutely nothing to do what what you have said].

Out of curiosity, how long have you been functionally illiterate. :rolleyes:

since you cannot answer the question or back up your statement with facts you attack the guy who asks?

kind of like the guy who says , Fords are crap, why? Well I talked to a guy who had a girlfrined who said her brothers step dads mother inlaw had a Ford and one time it would not start...
 

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since you cannot answer the question or back up your statement with facts you attack the guy who asks?
No, I attack the guy who claims I said something I didn't say! But hey, I notice what you respond to. You ask for facts and then when I post them you ignore them.
 

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Wait? The silence is deafening. Who is it who doesn't know squat about this topic? You literally have not said squat in this thread other than the obvious, that the ZR2 (or was it the Raptor) is limited by it's suspension. Don't think asking some questions means you know something. It doesn't.

Max tow ratings are sales marketing BS. I've said that dozens of times here and you're the first ___ who has challenged that.
 

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Don't think asking some questions means you know something. It doesn't.

Max tow ratings are sales marketing BS. I've said that dozens of times here and you're the first ___ who has challenged that.
Most people ask a question cause they do not know the answer, as I did.
I just asked the question/challenged you too explain your reasoning. In which it looks like you could not but DD answered it to the fullest extent. Thanks DD
 

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SUVs (and SUV-like vehicles) are a whole different animal in a number of ways, but something to keep in mind is that they can often have just as much or more payload capacity as a comparably-sized and classed pickup because it's needed for people and cargo capacity. The payload capacity of a Subaru Ascent appears to max out at almost 1,600LB. That's needed because they can seat up to 8 people.

. . ..

The problem then is that people think "OH! I can take 8 people camping with our 5,000LB trailer!" or "I can take the family and load up the back and tow our trailer!" and then you see these SUVs rolling down the freeway, nose high, dragging ass, and the driver looking like 馃槯 while they have an awful towing experience due to not knowing anything about actual weights and limits.
Good point about the ability to carry passengers. I was thinking though of other limitations of that vehicle, like the fact that it has only a 2.4 liter turbocharged gas engine with a CVT. Not something I'd want to tow 5,000 pounds with, and I like both small turbocharged engines and CVTs for their proper uses. Also the tongue weight limit is 500 pounds, which likely would make 5,000 pounds difficult, and the unibody frame cannot handle a WDH.

Then there is this from the manual:
When driving under continuous heavy load conditions such as when towing a camper or climbing a long, steep hill, the engine speed or the vehicle speed may automatically be reduced. This is not a malfunction. This results from the engine control function maintaining the cooling performance of the vehicle. The engine and vehicle speed will return to a normal speed when the engine is able to maintain the optimum cooling performance after the heavy load decreases. Driving under a heavy load must be performed with extreme care. Do not try to pass a vehicle in front when driving on an uphill slope while towing
So basically the cooling system is insufficient to tow the rated weight????

And even worse this:
. The braking power of the parking brake may not be sufficient when stronger braking power is needed (e.g., when parking on a steep slope while towing a trailer).
That's rather alarming since one of the tests that is supposed to be done as part of max tow ratings is the parking brake holding on a grade. Makes me wonder how this 5,000 pound rating was determined.

Notwithstanding all that when you go to the Subaru website all you see is a 5,000 max tow rating and a footnote which merely says: "Certain limitations apply. See Owner's Manual for details."

So lets review. The limitations are a 500 pound tongue weight, the engine may cut power to aid cooling, the parking brake may not be sufficient, no WDH, oh and there are also axle limits which I didn't try to determine. But yeah, a 5,000 pound trailer is just fine. :rolleyes: Just marketing BS to me.
 

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Hi All, I'm looking at purchasing a new ZR2, but I want to use it for towing a travel trailer. I've found a good amount of data on towing with the Duramax, but can't seem to find a lot of info from people using a gasser.

If I was towing a travel trailer regularly through high elevation in the West, what should be the maximum trailer dry weight (other than the 5k lbs tow rating) I do not exceed? To be honest, I have no experience towing, so I have no idea how close to 5000lbs I should be getting. Would adding air bags or a WDH help me tow above 4500lbs more comfortably?

Thanks in advance.
In your post, the focus seems to be on towing in high elevations. That is not a good match for a ZR2; you would be better off with a Z71 with a diesel. I have driven a great deal in CO, UT, WY, MT, NV, etc at higher elevations in both a turbo diesel, turbo gas and naturally aspirate gas.

Without a turbo, mountain passes are unpleasant even without a trailer.

Altitude has minimal effect on the power of the 2.8l turbo diesel used in the twins - even way over 10,000 feet.

The Z71 has decent off road capability - it is more capable than most people are willing to explore. The ZR2 will take you places that most people would not believe any truck could go.

A gasser will do okay at sea level with a trailer, but at 7000 feet on a grade, you'll be having all of your passengers get out to push.
 

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Hi All, I'm looking at purchasing a new ZR2, but I want to use it for towing a travel trailer. I've found a good amount of data on towing with the Duramax, but can't seem to find a lot of info from people using a gasser.
Hi Eneq,
DieselDrax and Goodspike are spot-on concerning how to do the numbers. I just ran a scenario in which we would take a couple of young friends along in our Colorado V-6 while pulling the heavier of our two trailers. It turns out that we would be over GVWR by 95 pounds even though the actual trailer weight, 5100 lbs., would be only 73% of the theoretical 7,000 max tow for the V-6 gasser. So much for the 85% rule.

As others have pointed out, not maxing out GVWR is not the only consideration. The subjective experience matters too, even though it is harder to quantify. For example, some trailers are more affected by crosswinds, and a tow vehicle with a longer wheelbase would feel more stable when that happens. Also, on long climbs on a freeway, it's nice to be able to pass the 18-wheelers that are lumbering uphill in the truck lane rather being stuck in the pack with them. Finally, a small engine that gives good mileage with a 3k trailer might have very poor mileage with a 5k trailer; a larger engine might actually get better mpg when towing the heavier trailer.

Here's a subjective story you might find interesting. We bought the Colorado to pull a 17-foot 3k 6.25-foot wide molded fiberglass trailer. We have always had a trailer that small or even smaller, and have been totally pleased with the Colorado as our tow vehicle. Then a few months ago, we succumbed to the temptation to buy a 21-foot 5k 8-foot wide "stick built" (well, this one actually has a welded aluminum frame with a fiberglass skin) from a neighbor. It's got some great features, like a double bed that doesn't require one of us to sit up so that the other can get out of bed to go pee in the middle of the night. But now I'm not sure how I'm going to feel about towing it with the Colorado. I've tried it out for about 100 miles around home, including on hills, freeways and winding roads. I've got my WDH all adjusted now, which helps a lot. But still I'm not sure. There is still some fishtailing in the wind that I never felt with the fiberglass trailer. That trailer didn't even need a WDH with the Colorado. Plus it looks like average towing mpg would be 12 rather than the 18 I got with the smaller one.

Frankly, if I had foreseen that we were going to make that jump, I would have bought a full-size truck last year, like a Silverado or similar.

Some will give you the advice that if you don't have your tow vehicle yet and you don't have your trailer yet, the first thing to decide is what trailer you want to pull. Then pick the tow vehicle that will pull it for you the way you want. Of course, if your priority is to have the best off-road experience, there is a lot to be said for less width and a shorter wheelbase for your truck, therefore, Colorado rather than Silverado. But the tradeoff is having to settle for a smaller, lighter, and more aerodynamic trailer, like the Escape, Casita, or Scamp molded fiberglass offerings, or something like an R-Pod if you want stick-built that is still aerodynamic. Weight-wise, 3k to 4k lbs. loaded would be a sweet spot, even with the V-6 gasser.
 

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I've been towing various travel trailers for 30 years with trucks from an S10 to Dodge diesel dually. One thing I learned early on is that the high flat side is subject to wind that other types of trailers don't have to deal with. The S10 was a nightmare in a cross wind with a travel trailer. The taller and longer the trailer, the wider your track needs to be. I just wouldn't tow one with anything less than a full size truck.
 
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