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Can I tow a 9,000 lbs boat behind my Colorado?


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You're talking about towing something that comes in more than twice the weight of the vehicle. Could it do it? Probably. Would I do it? Hell no, too much liability. If anything at all were to happen insurance wouldn't even blink an eye at denying coverage.

I wouldn't even do that behind a 1500. If it's at 9000 lbs you're left with roughly 800 lbs of extra weight to mess around with... There are fudge factors built in but not 2000 lbs worth.
So insurance would deny? How do you know this? I see things posted like this all the time but I haven't had anybody show proof of it happening with denied claims. Just interested in the facts from the insurance side of business.

What are the fudge factors that are built in? Could you please elaborate on the facts of what the fudge numbers are, if not 2,000lb is it 1,000lbs or 500 lbs or less?

- Preston
 

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I am apparently the 3rd "mental patient" that voted yes.

- Preston
Perfect....
The world needs people to do ignorant and foolish things so that utube doesn’t get stale or boring...........
 

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Perfect....
The world needs people to do ignorant and foolish things so that utube doesn’t get stale or boring...........
Hey, it takes all kinds.... You have your opinion and I have mine.

Different backgrounds with different points of view.

- Preston
 

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Hey, it takes all kinds.... You have your opinion and I have mine.

Different backgrounds with different points of view.

- Preston
Except that attempting to drag WAY over limits is what keeps you in the minority and the rest of us watching utube fail videos...
By all means do it, I’ll watch and laugh...
 

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Except that attempting to drag WAY over limits is what keeps you in the minority and the rest of us watching utube fail videos...
By all means do it, I’ll watch and laugh...
What's interesting is that you only have "poke at me" remarks. I have been nothing but nice in this thread.

Like I said, people with different backgrounds/experiences have different points of views.

Unfortunately people who go harder on trucks or pull more than what is spec'd don't respect or appreciate the situation. Gotta be extra careful and aware of what one does in these situations.

I would rather tow 9K with my Colorado at 60mph on flat ground, than what these 1500's through 3500's are towing over weight at 75 plus mph.

- Preston
 

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What's interesting is that you only have "poke at me" remarks. I have been nothing but nice in this thread.

Like I said, people with different backgrounds/experiences have different points of views.

Unfortunately people who go harder on trucks or pull more than what is spec'd don't respect or appreciate the situation. Gotta be extra careful and aware of what one does in these situations.

I would rather tow 9K with my Colorado at 60mph on flat ground, than what these 1500's through 3500's are towing over weight at 75 plus mph.

- Preston
You do you, just don’t cry if your insurance rejects a claim due to abuse, ignore on....
 

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So insurance would deny? How do you know this? I see things posted like this all the time but I haven't had anybody show proof of it happening with denied claims. Just interested in the facts from the insurance side of business.

What are the fudge factors that are built in? Could you please elaborate on the facts of what the fudge numbers are, if not 2,000lb is it 1,000lbs or 500 lbs or less?

- Preston
My insurance may be a little different with the heavy equipment stuff, but we had to have all the trailers weighted before they would allow us on the policy with them. You're also talking trailers well past 10k though. So it could be different.

As far as fudge factors. Depends who the engineer was. My thing is, I don't think the new rig is 9000 lbs, I think it's more like 10500... but anyway, the conservative way of doing it for what I've been taught was 1.25 times what your spec is for overhead... you wouldn't build something that is actually at the limit at its max rated capacity. That would just be stupid and bad design. GMs in house torture test probably runs them at 10000. They probably do it as if the inexperienced person were to do it... so 7000lb trailer + 900lbs worth of passengers (4 guys in the 200-250 range) + 1500 lbs of payload... meaning someone saw those numbers and assumed that the sum of the 3 is the absolute max it can handle. That's how I was taught, you think for the stupidest person and make that safe....

There is no hard and fast rule and its internal is basically what it comes down to. I've done much worse but only in dire emergencies and I'm talking less than a mile of driving on a quiet side street. And I would never do it again.
 

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My insurance may be a little different with the heavy equipment stuff, but we had to have all the trailers weighted before they would allow us on the policy with them. You're also talking trailers well past 10k though. So it could be different.

As far as fudge factors. Depends who the engineer was. My thing is, I don't think the new rig is 9000 lbs, I think it's more like 10500... but anyway, the conservative way of doing it for what I've been taught was 1.25 times what your spec is for overhead... you wouldn't build something that is actually at the limit at its max rated capacity. That would just be stupid and bad design. GMs in house torture test probably runs them at 10000. They probably do it as if the inexperienced person were to do it... so 7000lb trailer + 900lbs worth of passengers (4 guys in the 200-250 range) + 1500 lbs of payload... meaning someone saw those numbers and assumed that the sum of the 3 is the absolute max it can handle. That's how I was taught, you think for the stupidest person and make that safe....

There is no hard and fast rule and its internal is basically what it comes down to. I've done much worse but only in dire emergencies and I'm talking less than a mile of driving on a quiet side street. And I would never do it again.
Good Points!
-Preston
 

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I am just laughing at the people who say they couldn't or wouldn't tow it with a 1500. These new trucks have plenty in the tank to haul that weight around on a semi regular fashion. Now running around the country in the mountains often I would go 2500, but these new trucks can safely handle (with their max tow packages) 12k+ pounds, especially twice a year or a few more times on top of that. To be legal what I would do is go half ton no doubt, plenty of truck to handle it. Could the Colorado do it, heck yeah. You will be surprised at how over engineered trucks are. You think the limit is the absolute before failures? Heck no, they know that farmer out in BFE Montana is going to over load his truck if it means saving a second 50 mile trip from the feed store or the ranch. They build a truck to handle that stuff, legally though you need to make sure you comply with the manufacturers because getting stopped by highway patrol or getting in an accident overloaded is a costly mistake.

So OP, upgrade your truck a size to a half ton or do as others have said and rent or borrow one if you really are only moving it twice a year. You don't need a 2500 for a 9k pound boat. Good luck!

I wish for the life of me I could find the pictures, there was a guy on diesel place who used to twice a year take a late 80's half ton chevy and tow a 35 ft bumper pull cabin cruiser in the neighborhood of 15-20k lbs 3 miles from storage and back. He would take side streets and use 4 low going slow. It would pull it out of the water too even though he had a full size van attached with a tow rope for safety. He would even take it to the gas station and fill it up, was quite the sight, that boat dwarfed that truck. Eventually he upgraded to a duramax that while still over weight was much closer and an easier pull.

Tyler
 

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Question is...who is the 1 mental patient that voted yes to 9k lbs...
I voted yes only because of the way the question was phrased. Can you yes since it is physically possible to tow it, the question should have been should you which as most have already given a resounding no, which I agree with.
 

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I am just laughing at the people who say they couldn't or wouldn't tow it with a 1500. These new trucks have plenty in the tank to haul that weight around on a semi regular fashion. Now running around the country in the mountains often I would go 2500, but these new trucks can safely handle (with their max tow packages) 12k+ pounds, especially twice a year or a few more times on top of that. To be legal what I would do is go half ton no doubt, plenty of truck to handle it. Could the Colorado do it, heck yeah. You will be surprised at how over engineered trucks are. You think the limit is the absolute before failures? Heck no, they know that farmer out in BFE Montana is going to over load his truck if it means saving a second 50 mile trip from the feed store or the ranch. They build a truck to handle that stuff, legally though you need to make sure you comply with the manufacturers because getting stopped by highway patrol or getting in an accident overloaded is a costly mistake.

So OP, upgrade your truck a size to a half ton or do as others have said and rent or borrow one if you really are only moving it twice a year. You don't need a 2500 for a 9k pound boat. Good luck!

I wish for the life of me I could find the pictures, there was a guy on diesel place who used to twice a year take a late 80's half ton chevy and tow a 35 ft bumper pull cabin cruiser in the neighborhood of 15-20k lbs 3 miles from storage and back. He would take side streets and use 4 low going slow. It would pull it out of the water too even though he had a full size van attached with a tow rope for safety. He would even take it to the gas station and fill it up, was quite the sight, that boat dwarfed that truck. Eventually he upgraded to a duramax that while still over weight was much closer and an easier pull.

Tyler
I've towed 10k behind a new 1500 rated for it once... and the dealer had to replace the springs on it after. Saying it can tow that much and it actually doing it regularly are two different things... been there, done that and have a t-shirt. Kept it interesting though.
 

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I voted yes only because of the way the question was phrased.
Same reason here. The actual question the OP asked is why I checked "yes".

- Preston
 
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