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What do these things look like and how do they fit in the tires? I can get a new set of rims but have been thinking thgat i will have to remove the sensors from my old tires to put them on the new ones.

Any explanation would be great.
 

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They are the valve stems. The valve stems house the TPM sending unit. You will have to xfer the stems from the old rims to the new rims. Dealer wants to charge me 30 bucks a wheel to do it and calibrate them to match the new tires.
 

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All you need is a 5.00 install kit, or that's discount tire did on mine, I may be wrong but I think they are trying to stiff you if they say it needs calibration they are set to a specific tire pressure and cannot be changed, unless you get new monitors.
 

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This is what I thought, kdrf636 if they charged you for this, go back and get your money back, because they didn't do what they charged you for :x
 

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savannahcoly said:
Nearly all passenger vehicles have the same recommended tire pressure at ~35 psi from vehicle to vehicle and tire to tire. They would not have to be calibrated.

35 psi is 35 psi no matter how big or small your tires are.
True enough, however some tpms sytems need to be reprogramed so the vehicle knows what position each wheel has been placed at example for tire rotations (yes we all know there are 4 tires on the vehicle but some systems will point out which tire is low therefore must be recalibrated to show a front tire is now on the rear).

cigarman said:
What do these things look like and how do they fit in the tires?
Most tpms sytems you can identify from the valve stem appearance generally either aluminum bolt in style stem or some now have a rubber valve stem (bullet style valve cap & more brass shoulder showing when cap is removed). The are in most cases attached to the valve stem (must be torqued to spec) & some manufactures use a band style which is attached to the rim inside of the tire (Ford).

Just for everyone's info if you have tpms and require rebuilds (valve core, cap, o-ring & retainer nut) make sure that whoever is servicing them installs nickle plated valve cores as the brass valve cores will seize into the valve stem which will lead to you replacing the tpms sensor in the future and believe it or not these tpms units need to be installed with proper torque applied to the mounting nut & valve core.

You will find that it is very common for the dealer or local tire shops to charge additional for tire changes for vehicles with tpms as additional time, valve rebuild kits, recalibration & specialized tools are generally all required. The system we have a my work place I can go out to a vehicle with my tpms computer and verify that all tpms sensors are working, tire pressures, tire temperatures and battery life. I have all of this info available to me before my staff is blamed for breaking one.
 

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stocklook said:
This is what I thought, kdrf636 if they charged you for this, go back and get your money back, because they didn't do what they charged you for :x
No - I didn't do it - that's just what he quoted - and I think that included taking the stem out of the old wheels that still have tires on them, and putting them on the new wheels, mount and balance the new tires/wheels, and then make sure the TPMS is happy.
 

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Discount tire only charged me 20.00 for all four tires to install my sensors from old rims to new rims.

This was 5.00 for an install kit. stem, nut, bushing.
 
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