Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this months Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 81 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a '16 Z71 4wd with the wide tires. The door sticker says 35PSI but I keep them at 45PSI for better mileage, It dont ride much rougher as 90% of my driving is rural highway. I did this on my old Dakota 4wd with no bad issues.. Any comments pro or con?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have always gone with the door sticker. Don't know about my gas mileage, but my tires will wear evenly at 35 psi, and rotated every 7500 miles.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mlfx5

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,826 Posts
I have a 2017 Colorado CCSB with the stock Z71 Wrangler AT Adventurer tires and run them at 37 to 38PSI. I do this and try and keep them seasonally adjusted to this pressure since as the seasons change, like now, tire pressure drops pretty fast.

I topped them off at 37psi last week (2 72F cold tire pressure) and nighttime temp dropped to mid 40s to 50F. The cold psi was now reading 34 psi and just barely made 36psi with a 20 mile interstate drive while temperature was about 68F.

I don;t know if I would go 45psi. I used to run 40psi in my 2005 Colorado with different tires, but did not care for the harsher ride and traction was reduced so went to 38psi and all seemed much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Tire pressure should be by door sticker. Too much can wear the tire down in the middle, too little on the edges. The door sticker recommend PSI is based on engineering design of the truck, too high of pressure and you run the risk of tire exploding when it heats up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
The number on the door sticker is the minimum pressure required to support the maximum payload. Nothing more. A tire isn't going to explode from pressure unless you exceed the maximum pressure imprinted on the tire (not the truck) by a factor of at least 2X and probably more like 3X (which gets you into the 150 PSI range or something utterly stupid).

As long as you watch the wear patterns you can safely run much higher pressures.

I run 40 PSI and there's somebody here who mentioned he's run 50 PSI for years.

Higher pressure reduces rolling resistance which will give you better mileage. However, it can also cause the tire to bow slightly, reducing wet traction. If you see excessive wear in the center, your pressure is definitely too high. This is mitigated somewhat by tire design. LT tires are stiffer overall and resist that bowing at higher pressures fairly well, whereas performance tires are more significantly affected by loss of wet traction since they tend to have sophisticating siping patterns in the tread to help throw off water.

Lower pressure is just bad, period, except in specialized temporary scenarios like off-roading. Excessive edge wear is a sure sign of pressures being too low.

And finally, living in Florida, I have no idea how pressure relates to snow and/or snow tires. Thankfully. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,031 Posts
The truck was engineered for 35 psi which is where I keep it. My Ram said 39 psi but not the Canyon. I just raised mine again yesterday due to cooler temps. I watch the readings on the DIC closely every day and keep them as exact as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
The truck was engineered for 35 psi which is where I keep it. My Ram said 39 psi but not the Canyon. I just raised mine again yesterday due to cooler temps. I watch the readings on the DIC closely every day and keep them as exact as possible.
Cooler temps? Showoff. :)

One other observation ... I used to run buttery-soft Mickey Thompson 33 x 13 on my Ram 2500 (on a completely alien-diameter 16.5" wheel so tire options were few and far between). Fantastic traction, awful tread life. Another case where tire construction makes all the difference. There was no good pressure as far as I could tell. Rotated them religiously, truck was very well maintained, but they always went out cupped or worn in various weird ways. But that traction was just too good to give up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,028 Posts
While you say you cannot feel "much" difference in the ride, the whole suspension system feels it and will wear faster.
I would like to see your numbers on difference in gas mileage between the 35 and 45psi. You might be surprised that your truck is getting beat to death for nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
I run 35psi in my truck and I try to keep it to that as close as possible I usually check my air and adjust it monthly. I wouldn’t run over 40psi in the truck with regular passenger tires on it. I don’t tow but if I did then I would run 40 to tow with just to stop the tire from sagging with the extra load on it. That’s my 2 cents fwiw.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Toughsox

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
Tire pressure needs to be enough to maintain a flat contact patch. Given same tire, wheel, and vehicle like we are, that pressure will vary with temperature and load.


The best way to figure out the proper pressure is to use tread temperatures. Ideally, the rear tires should have an even temperature all across the tread. The front tires should be a little warmer on the inside than the outside; best is about a 5-7* spread. You should use a probe type thermometer, that's the most accurate. But you can get fairly close with an infrared.


Since we all start out with same wheels and tires, you can pretty much go with what you read here for wear patterns and such. When you change tires and wheels, it's a crap shoot. You can wait and watch for weird wear patterns, or use a thermometer and set pressures in one day and save your tires. Custom tires and wheels can be pretty expensive, you can save a bunch of money by spending $100 on a probe thermometer.


Using this technique, I set my pressures at 41 psi all around when empty. I need 50psi in the rear when loaded and going to the track. Next spring when I buy new tires, I'll have to do it all over again.


http://coloradofans.com/forums/193-2nd-gen-tires-wheels-suspension/336273-tire-pressure.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Tire pressure needs to be enough to maintain a flat contact patch. Given same tire, wheel, and vehicle like we are, that pressure will vary with temperature and load.
This guy has his stuff together.

It doesn't matter what your PSI is set to if your contact patch isn't flat.

My '16 CCSB WT has 50 PSI in the tires (sidewall says 51 PSI). I've tested my contact pattern with the 50 PSI and it is perfectly flat. I've got a perfectly flat contact pattern and after 30,xxx miles in the 8 months I've had the truck, every 5-6,xxx miles when the dealer changes the oil the tires all read wearing even.

I'm getting 22-24 mpg consistently, with my '16 CCSB 2wd 3.6., depending on the road and conditions. The tire PSI has been set to this since the day I drove it off the lot. I did the same thing with my '16 ECLB 2wd Colorado I got rid of to get this truck and had the same contact pattern at 50 PSI as well has, amazingly, a consistent 20-22 mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: MV10

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,600 Posts
door sticker if same size tire as oem otherwise manufacturer web site should have the info
over inflation can be dangerous, harsher ride, wear quicker in the middle, longer stopping distance, blah blah blah

bottom line they don't recommend a certain pressure just to fill in the space on the sticker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,627 Posts
In my experience I see the fronts wear well at the listed pressure and the rears a little in the center (usually). I like to run 40 up front and 35 in the rear on this truck. I'm thinking the rear of my truck and car are almost never loaded so most of the weight is up front. I don't have enough miles on it yet to see what it's doing though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
I normally run within a close range of the door recommendations. Sometimes I'll go a few lbs higher (to up to 5 lbs higher).

I did notice that the tire pressure listed in the DIC reads about 2 psi low compared to my fancy schmancy pressure gauge. At least mine does.....

In the winter, I'll run on the lower side......

Oh yea....and for you guys running much HIGHER pressure - you should run a 'chalk' test to make sure your tread is contacting evenly and the tires will wear evenly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,885 Posts
I dont tow nor do I haul more than groceries for the most part and I run 35 PSI. I find the ride to be more comfortable and I always change my tires due to dry rot than because I wore them out.

PS, I typically only drive 7500 per year and rotate my tires every 10K.

:wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
If you are no longer running stock tires just read off what the tire says. my 35 x 12.50 says 44 so I run 44 psi. If it said 50 I would do 50 and so on.
NO !!!! See my post above on how to determine an equivalent tire pressure.

My current tires say 80 psi max on the side wall; the equivalent to 35psi for the stock tires is about 53 psi; I found that mid-40's work well for my situation. The pressure increased only slightly at sustained high speed (80mph); and the tires did not get hot.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Toughsox
1 - 20 of 81 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top