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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm hopping I'm wrong, but I think my truck could be using oil. I won't know for sure until I do some more checking. Tonight's overnight level parking spot will really help in the determination. If it is, I'm done with this thing. Keep in mind I had the oil changed @ about 1600 miles and it now has right at 3100 miles. I pulled the stick at a level spot today after it sit for a few mins & it was a half a quart low. I parked in the only level spot we have tonight and we'll see what the morning brings. I always like to check after an overnight sit. I'm figuring it's going to be down, some, but I could be wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did you check the level right after it was changed? Are you consistent about your procedure for checking the level?
Yes, & yes. I checked it a couple weeks ago at work & it was fine.
 

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Is the oil filter housing the same on a 17 as the 16? I wonder if that thing stays full like over night? Or does it slowly drain? Or quickly drain down? Including the hoses going to it? I'm going to guess, and I hope, that it stays full unless you remove the top....I'm also guessing it holds about a half quart with the lines???

So its down about 1/2 quart in 1500 miles? So maybe 1 quart between changes? Not sure if thats worthy of being "done with it". What does that mean? Trade it in and loose your a$$? I'm thinking its not that big of a deal?? Good oil is less than 5 bucks a quart, right? Shoot I don't think I would even bother to add the one between. Maybe the rings aren't seated well yet? Understandably frustrating though, that's for sure.

Oh, and I noticed when I changed mine last time. It really seams like there is only 1/2 quart between the lines/in the zone on the stick. So maybe it's only down about a 1/4 now. Anyone notice this? On a 2016 anyway....
 

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I'm hopping I'm wrong, but I think my truck could be using oil. I won't know for sure until I do some more checking. Tonight's overnight level parking spot will really help in the determination. If it is, I'm done with this thing. Keep in mind I had the oil changed @ about 1600 miles and it now has right at 3100 miles. I pulled the stick at a level spot today after it sit for a few mins & it was a half a quart low. I parked in the only level spot we have tonight and we'll see what the morning brings. I always like to check after an overnight sit. I'm figuring it's going to be down, some, but I could be wrong.
"The last straw" at 3100miles ??

Unless you've had a bagfull of other issues I think you're being a bit of a dramaqueen, and also oil consumption during break-in is normal on ANY engine.
 

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Oil consumption during the break-in period is normal.

Also, after running the engine, it can take several hours for the oil level in the pan to stabilize as most of the hot oil slowly drains back to the oil pain. You have to also be very consistent in the timing of your checking. Comparisons between different rest periods (after engine shutdown) will result in different readings on the oil dipstick. Checking a hot engine (after a few minutes, like you stated) will always indicate a lower-than-actual reading.

I wouldn't fret.
 
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Some things to consider.

Some engine use oil and it is an expendable as long as it it not excessive.

I have not checked this engine Yost but my other two 3.6 have dip sticks with a wide range on them even at 6 quarts it is between the marks not on the upper most line.

Finally you may use som oil initially as the ring seat in a bit.

Back in the past between use by the rings and valve seals added to the leaks you may be adding one QT every 1500 miles.

At this point watch it and if it gets no worse then you have no issue. Some engine just use a little oil.
 

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Oil consumption during the break-in period is normal.

Also, after running the engine, it can take several hours for the oil level in the pan to stabilize as most of the hot oil slowly drains back to the oil pain. You have to also be very consistent in the timing of your checking. Comparisons between different rest periods (after engine shutdown) will result in different readings on the oil dipstick. Checking a hot engine (after a few minutes, like you stated) will always indicate a lower-than-actual reading.

I wouldn't fret.
While the OP doesnt say how long he's actually waiting, 20min should be plenty of time to wait to check. Hours are not needed.
 

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How do you know it was 1/2 quart low after checking the dipstick once? Did you also check it following the oil change, after oil had a chance to circulate and fill the filter etc? The filter holds a bunch of oil. If you do an oil change, immediately check the dipstick and then run the engine / check it again, it will be lower.

If I was seriously concerned about oil consumption I'd have a compression check done.

Having been through a few engine failures in my time, it's surprising to me that there isn't a 'warranty checkup' service provided by garages.

I'd like to know what the service specs are for my 2015 Canyon for example in terms of compression and other key measures. If, during the warranty period the engine falls out of those specs, I'd like to think I'd be able to have it corrected. But, I'm not sure of the actual legal wording of the powertrain warranty nor of the actual specs for the engine.

Seems to me there would be money to be made by garages to do a full inspection of a powertrain while a vehicle was still under warranty, to arm the consumer with the right information to go do battle with the car companies.

I had a 2008 MINI Cooper Clubman. Cylinder 1 misfired, and MINI kept changing coils/plugs but it kept happening. Ultimately (after warranty expires) they tell me - cylinder 1 is worn beyond spec (compression low) and you need a new engine. Without blinking they quoted me $12,000 for a new engine in a car that in good running order has a street value of $9,000. I told them to go F themselves.

Had I taken it to a garage and had compression checked, I could have gone to MINI and laid it out on the line - compression is below spec, the power train is under warranty, so fix it. But unless you know what to check, you're out of luck.

If garages offered an inspection service - compression/leak down test, valve timing chain / tensioner wear, transmission gear tolerances, bushings, drive shaft play etc. etc. and we had specs to compare against, we might all be in better shape although it could cause car prices to increase or warranties to be more limited.

In the old days all my motorcycle manuals had upper and lower thresholds for compression, piston:cylinder size differences, ring gaps... you name it. Where can we get this info for our trucks?
 
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"The last straw" at 3100miles ??

Unless you've had a bagfull of other issues I think you're being a bit of a dramaqueen, and also oil consumption during break-in is normal on ANY engine.
This, LOL, this ^^
 
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Just be glad you did not buy a VW Tourege or Porche Cayenne, they are designed to burn about 1 qt every 1500 miles

I ordered a new vehicle years ago. When they unloaded it off the truck it did not have any oil pressure. The dealer tore the engine down and found they had the wrong crank bearing in it. The put it back together and I drove it 200,000 miles with no issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All seems well

Thanks for the useful replies. Oil level was right on full after the overnight sit. I guess I got overly concerned. LOL However it certainly does have it's problems.
 
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The owners manual recommends checking oil at each fuel fill up several minutes after engine shut down to allow for oil drain down. I prefer checking after a night sitting on a known level surface like the pad of my carport. But, whatever.

What other issues are there to become 'the last straw'?
 

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I'm hopping I'm wrong, but I think my truck could be using oil. I won't know for sure until I do some more checking. Tonight's overnight level parking spot will really help in the determination. If it is, I'm done with this thing. Keep in mind I had the oil changed @ about 1600 miles and it now has right at 3100 miles. I pulled the stick at a level spot today after it sit for a few mins & it was a half a quart low. I parked in the only level spot we have tonight and we'll see what the morning brings. I always like to check after an overnight sit. I'm figuring it's going to be down, some, but I could be wrong.
who changed the oil?
was the proper amount put in at the change? maybe the dealer shorted the amount? they save money that way
if the engine is warm you only have to wait a few minutes if that to check it
are you hopping you're wrong or hoping?
 

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Just had all 4 pistons and rings replaced in our 2012 GMC terrain at 90k for oil consumption. It would go through 3 quarts in less then 3k miles. Common problem with this engine and was all replaced free of cost under the drivetrain warranty.
 

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The Canyon owner's manual says to wait for two hours after turning the truck off until checking the oil. Check it cold, after the oil has had a lot of time to drain back down into the pan.

Apparently, this does make a difference. See post #1 and #12 in this thread.

I have never heard of an engine needing such a ridiculous amount of time for the oil to drain back down. It makes no sense to me. But, for whatever reason, that is what the owner's manual says, and that is what the original poster of this thread found out by experimentation.

Oh well...
 

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Perhaps because legendary German engineering is mostly legend? I'd be more concerned with transfer case failures in these. Engine oil consumption is probably mostly leakage.
It might be a good idea to duct tape a funnel under the engine and route a tube to the transfer case.

You got me started now. This is all your fault...

Toureg/Cayenne driveline covered above, engines below.

911/Cayman:
Cylinder chunking.
IMS bearing failure. Who uses non pressure fed sealed bearings inside engines anyway? Oh - yeah...

VW/Audi:
2.0 rear main seals.
V6/V8 timing chains and guides. On rear of engine? Really?
Intake manifold carbon/crankcase sludge.

BMW M3:
Fractured rear springs.
Rear subframe mounting points tearing off the unibody structure.
Variable valve timing (Vanos) mechanism dropping drive fingers and bolts into the engine.
SMG hydraulic pump failure. You really used an ABS pump motor to shift a transmission?
Too tight lower main bearing clearance on the inline 6 and then again on the 4.0 V8.
Shock mounts pound themselves apart.

MB?
All the above and more.

What was dieselgate all about now?

why would they design it to burn that much oil?
 
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