Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon banner

101 - 120 of 128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
So...you're good living in a world where ya need an armored vehicle to run errands and shuttle kids to practice and the like...or are ya just another prepper/MadMax wannabe?
Nope, not a doomsday prepper or any crap like that. But not blind to what is going around. As I said, old Musky is selling Armored Cars for the Rich Cats. If not, what is the deal with all that Armor proofing. I forgot, does it comes with the Flame Thrower too? Kind of hard to make one with Batteries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Nope, not a doomsday prepper or any crap like that. But not blind to what is going around. As I said, old Musky is selling Armored Cars for the Rich Cats. If not, what is the deal with all that Armor proofing. I forgot, does it comes with the Flame Thrower too? Kind of hard to make one with Batteries.
I must say I really don't get the body being able to withstand a sledgehammer and 9mm round. Apparently a great deal of the strength of the truck is in the body, but what is the relative cost in terms of weight and dollars to manufacture? If it's minimal, especially the weigh factor that affects range, I could see it. It would be nice to not worry about door dings, and I would guess side collisions are safer too. But if it's a lot of extra weight in the form of expensive stainless steel, that would be crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
Well, if dents are the issue, just build it like Saturns used to be, with plastic panels that were dent proof, rust proof and light weight. I remember, when Saturn had a Metal and Plastic Fender next to each other on the showroom floor. The sales people will give you a malet for you to hit it and see how dent proof was their panels. They used to have an ad with a shopping cart hiting a Saturn.

The Cybertruck is a moronic idea. It can be done with any vehicle. Still a vehicle with a battery on the belly that if is compromised, will go thermonuclear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Well, if dents are the issue, just build it like Saturns used to be, with plastic panels that were dent proof, rust proof and light weight. I remember, when Saturn had a Metal and Plastic Fender next to each other on the showroom floor. The sales people will give you a malet for you to hit it and see how dent proof was their panels. They used to have an ad with a shopping cart hiting a Saturn.

The Cybertruck is a moronic idea. It can be done with any vehicle. Still a vehicle with a battery on the belly that if is compromised, will go thermonuclear.
I've got a 04' Saturn Ion Redline and she looks just as good today as the day I drove her off the lot! Those panels are crazy durable! Even in cold temps you'd think they'd shatter, but nope! It'll probably be around long after I'm gone...like a little supercharged cockroach! LOL =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I read it looks the way it does due to the machines that make the cold rolled steel.
I gave up four wheeled vehicles in 2006. Went without any vehicle for four years. From 2010 to 2018 my motorcycle was my primary means of transport until the kids came along and I bought a Colorado. Love it so far. But, my wife bought a Model X same time as I got the Coly, and I have to say it is the nicest vehicle I’ve ever driven or ridden in (that includes all the standard luxury brands, Bentley, and rolls). No worries about winter in Cali, so Elon got my deposit the first week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
844 Posts
After some more thought, I have decided that the telescoping/ramp tailgate is an innovative idea. I like the telescoping tonneau as well. Some interesting ideas presented but Musk does his usual shock value circus act once more. Out of the box thinking is his forte.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
After some more thought, I have decided that the telescoping/ramp tailgate is an innovative idea.
It is, and more appealing than the GMC multi-gate thing. I would though question its strength, and if it is strong enough I would question its weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I'll lead off by disclosing I am a huge fan of Tesla and Elon Musk (SpaceX, The Boring Co., Neuralink).
In 2012 I dumped every disposable dollar I had into the stock.
Fast forward nearly 8 years later, Tesla has unveiled their all electric truck, the Cybertruck.
Musk had been teasing that it will be like nothing we have ever seen... and delivered.
It is truly like nothing ever built - a Blade Runner, The Spy Who Loved Me, Mars Rover of a design.

For ~$50k, the spec are a bit unreal:
Dual Motor AWD
0-60: <4.5s
10,000+ Towing
300+mi range

Plus self-driving capability
Autpilot standard
and a network of Superchargers
Oh, it takes a beating with a sledgehammer w.o taking a dent.


Check it:

View attachment 382949
View attachment 382950
View attachment 382951
View attachment 382952
Sure not going to haul many bales of hay or a cord of firewood. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,252 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
If you ever get a chance to ride in a Tesla, do so. Their acceleration is otherworldly. No gears, just an organic pull that feels irresistible. The Model 3 sucks the headlights of out of a Hellcat from 0-60, and the top of the line X is even faster. Teslas are truly fast. I could see a Model 3 in my future. A good e-car would be a perfect counterpoint to the Canyon. I like the rest of the Tesla line, there is an Apple like simplicity and elegance to them. Function considerations aside, the new truck is way too far out looking for me though.

Telas is about to receive a bunch of competition. Their battery tech is best of breed, but I wonder if they will continue to thrive into the future. Tesla burns through money like there is no tomorrow, losing 6B since their inception. Elon says the company will make money. I hope they do in a demonstrably sustainable and durable way, and sooner than later. The clock is ticking on the market's patience with the company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I seriously thought it was an April fools joke in November. I seriously can't figure why he would let a 5 year old style it.

In reality I bet the engineers ran into the same thing the first gen Honda Ridgeline engineers did. Trying to make a uni-body truck required the flying buttress behind the cab. I think Tesla just embraced the buttress as THE design. Lazy in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,252 Posts
I seriously thought it was an April fools joke in November. I seriously can't figure why he would let a 5 year old style it.

In reality I bet the engineers ran into the same thing the first gen Honda Ridgeline engineers did. Trying to make a uni-body truck required the flying buttress behind the cab. I think Tesla just embraced the buttress as THE design. Lazy in my opinion.
Well, the flying buttress as you call it means that it is more difficult, maybe impossible, to move that king size mattress, and probably even a queen size mattress.

How many times have any of you hauled a load where you rested it on top of one or both of the bed rails? Biggest reason why I do not like the sports bar. They look great, they fail my functional test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
If you ever get a chance to ride in a Tesla, do so. Their acceleration is otherworldly. No gears, just an organic pull that feels irresistible. The Model 3 sucks the headlights of out of a Hellcat from 0-60, and the top of the line X is even faster. Teslas are truly fast. I could see a Model 3 in my future. A good e-car would be a perfect counterpoint to the Canyon. I like the rest of the Tesla line, there is an Apple like simplicity and elegance to them. Function considerations aside, the new truck is way too far out looking for me though.

Telas is about to receive a bunch of competition. Their battery tech is best of breed, but I wonder if they will continue to thrive into the future. Tesla burns through money like there is no tomorrow, losing 6B since their inception. Elon says the company will make money. I hope they do in a demonstrably sustainable and durable way, and sooner than later. The clock is ticking on the market's patience with the company.
0-60. Times are nice but mean little if you have to sit along the road charging 60 min every 300 miles on a trip. Also you have to pay more for the Vehicle due to still expensive batteries. If the 3 had a gas engine it would be a $25-35 k car not the $55 most are costing. The Bolt has the same issues.

The key yo the future us one lower the price of the battery. Two get a battery that charges in 5 min andoil prices need to go up. The cost to fuel a car is cheaper than Electric right now. Not much more but more.

Right now prices are too high on most vehicles and less and less people can afford a new car. It is a problem no matter what drives it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,252 Posts
...The cost to fuel a car is cheaper than Electric right now. Not much more but more.

...
I have wondered about the costs to charge up on the road. If I had an electric vehicle, even a truck, sure it would suffice for 95% of the days I needed a vehicle. And since my electric plan includes free nights, I could charge it for free. With that in mind, my overall fuel costs would be cheaper in electric. Long trips, especially with a trailer, could get expensive. Of course, camping with electrical hookups, I could get a "free" charge at the campsite. (I wonder how long campsites and parks will allow that. I have seen a lot of electric and hybrid cars plugged in at campsites. )

For me, the time to charge and the initial costs are the main issues I see.

Of course, I am wise enough to recognize that the actual impact to the environment is probably just as bad. Too many people look at electricity as this magical power that comes out of a hole in the wall, with no clue what it took to fill that hole with electricity from generation source to transmission to the hole in the wall, nor the environmental impact of that magical box in their electric car that we call a battery.

It is impossible to do an apples to apples comparison of the environmental impact of various types of vehicles, but it would be interesting. In the past, I always wanted someone to compare what the environmental impact of driving a 10 year old clunker was versus a new, efficient vehicle. Sure you save a few gallons of gas, but how much energy did it take to build the new vehicle, the environmental impact of all the painting and plating operations to get that new vehicle to the dealer, etc. And then the costs to dispose the clunker. Now I want to add to that comparison the impact of an electric vehicle.

The TESLA is not for me. But at least TESLA is pushing the envelope. What has been my biggest complaint about the Taco, Ranger, Gladiator, etc? After GM came out with the second gen twins, these newer released vehicles really didn't give us a better option. The Twins still win out when an overall comparison is made. Maybe the Gladiator is more offroad qualified, maybe the Ridgeline is more car like, maybe the Ranger has a peppier engine, etc. But no one has knocked it out of the park. No one has pushed the others to make more than minimal upgrades in the 5 years since my Canyon was built.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
I have wondered about the costs to charge up on the road. If I had an electric vehicle, even a truck, sure it would suffice for 95% of the days I needed a vehicle. And since my electric plan includes free nights, I could charge it for free. With that in mind, my overall fuel costs would be cheaper in electric. Long trips, especially with a trailer, could get expensive. Of course, camping with electrical hookups, I could get a "free" charge at the campsite. (I wonder how long campsites and parks will allow that. I have seen a lot of electric and hybrid cars plugged in at campsites. )

For me, the time to charge and the initial costs are the main issues I see.

Of course, I am wise enough to recognize that the actual impact to the environment is probably just as bad. Too many people look at electricity as this magical power that comes out of a hole in the wall, with no clue what it took to fill that hole with electricity from generation source to transmission to the hole in the wall, nor the environmental impact of that magical box in their electric car that we call a battery.

It is impossible to do an apples to apples comparison of the environmental impact of various types of vehicles, but it would be interesting. In the past, I always wanted someone to compare what the environmental impact of driving a 10 year old clunker was versus a new, efficient vehicle. Sure you save a few gallons of gas, but how much energy did it take to build the new vehicle, the environmental impact of all the painting and plating operations to get that new vehicle to the dealer, etc. And then the costs to dispose the clunker. Now I want to add to that comparison the impact of an electric vehicle.

The TESLA is not for me. But at least TESLA is pushing the envelope. What has been my biggest complaint about the Taco, Ranger, Gladiator, etc? After GM came out with the second gen twins, these newer released vehicles really didn't give us a better option. The Twins still win out when an overall comparison is made. Maybe the Gladiator is more offroad qualified, maybe the Ridgeline is more car like, maybe the Ranger has a peppier engine, etc. But no one has knocked it out of the park. No one has pushed the others to make more than minimal upgrades in the 5 years since my Canyon was built.
The SAE Society drove a Jaguar Electric from Pittsburgh to Detroit and back. It cost nearly $100 more on electric than gas. Most charge stations they found were by the hour and $35, They even got an over night at the hotel for free.

In my area which is a large suburban area I can only tell you of one place to charge and it is not on my way to anywhere. same on the interstates. They are lacking and often not on the way.

For a truck and off road it will be a long time before they will see chargers in places like Moab etc.

As for the time to charge some folks like to take their time. Here in this part of the country we just want to get there and the less time traveled is more time spent on vacation or with family. We in the mid west are not like the Griswolds looking for the largest ball of twine.

Musk pushed things with the Y and he paid the price as it never sold in the numbers expected. The doors were a warranty nightmare and unnecessary also the front glass bakes you like a potato as you can't close it off. The lack of cash flow from the Y is why they had to pre sell the 3.

The only thing Musk learned was people will pay a lot of money for a high end sedan that can make a lot of money. The problem is he lost sight of that and now lets the S rot and sell at lower prices when it should be replaced with a newer model to generate more funds.

His new factory in Germany I suspect will not go well as the unions will move in and in Europe it can be tough on small companies there. He has failed in China too.

GM finally has learned it needs to make the EV models on more expensive platforms at Cadillac. This way at least even in lower volumes they stand a chance to make some money if they do it right.

The key is to re enter Europe with these cars as areas are now requiring more electric there. That is where the money will be made. The Paris accord there is forcing the issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,252 Posts
The SAE Society drove a Jaguar Electric from Pittsburgh to Detroit and back. It cost nearly $100 more on electric than gas. Most charge stations they found were by the hour and $35, They even got an over night at the hotel for free.

In my area which is a large suburban area I can only tell you of one place to charge and it is not on my way to anywhere. same on the interstates. They are lacking and often not on the way.

For a truck and off road it will be a long time before they will see chargers in places like Moab etc.

As for the time to charge some folks like to take their time. Here in this part of the country we just want to get there and the less time traveled is more time spent on vacation or with family. We in the mid west are not like the Griswolds looking for the largest ball of twine.

...

The only thing Musk learned was people will pay a lot of money for a high end sedan that can make a lot of money. The problem is he lost sight of that and now lets the S rot and sell at lower prices when it should be replaced with a newer model to generate more funds.
...
I always wondered about the costs, but never tried to look into the payment structure. $35 per hour does sound expensive. I paid $1.92 at Costco in Baton Rouge 2 weeks ago, so for $40 in gas, I could go well over 400 miles. How far will that $35 get me?

I have seen a good handful of charging stations, not TESLA specific, around the Fort Worth area. However, they are located not for long haul drivers but for commuters who are running in to shop at the mall. I am sure there are probably others on the highways, but right now I would not consider taking an electric vehicle on the road without a generator on board. It might be a long, slow charge with a 2200 watt, 120 VAC generator, but at least I might make it home without a tow.

One of the dads that I used to go on Indian Princess campouts with took his Volt to our campouts. Most campouts were probably just outside the range of the Volt battery, but he would get there, and immediately put it on charge for the drive home. It worked for him quite well.

I am not looking for balls of twine either. Granted, anything less than 75-80 MPH Sunday driving back from Austin last Sunday after replacing the starter on my grandson's Honda would have got you run over, but speeds were 80+ MPH anytime there was not a wreck or construction to slow us down. Stopping for an hour to charge a battery would have meant a missed flight at DFW for one of our passengers.

In regards to people paying a lot of money for a high end sedan, isn't that what GMC has learned with the Denali? As a more practical buyer, I am amazed at the number of Denali badges I see. It seems like a quarter to half of all the GMCs I see are Denali. I understand I live just outside some elite cities in the DFW area, with there McMansions and luxury vehicles in there 5 car garages, but it still is amazing.

In any event, I think the TESLA at least gets the designers for the other manufacturers thinking. When I was working in certain consumer industries, we always went out and shopped the competitors to get ideas. I remember discovering a competitor's item in a Radio Shack in Indianapolis and buying everyone of them off the shelf, sending a couple to Bell Labs to evaluate. That Radio Shack store probably thought they had the greatest product in the world that day (Bell Labs determined they had a dangerous fire ignition product and stuck with our more expensive design.) And don't even ask me how many competitors vacuum cleaners I have tore apart to look at the design as well as to estimate the costs. Came in real handy with negotiations we did regarding a certain 8 pound vacuum and a couple of bowling balls up in the air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
So a buddy of mind jumped in on the Model 3 craze and he has the Tesla needle inserted and is all juiced up on the whole deal.



After busting his chops about it, because well that’s what friends are for, here is what I found. First he works approximately 50 miles from home and the car has a 220 mile range. He cannot charge the vehicle where he lives so he has to rely on the charging stations. He can drive to work and home on day 1 of a charge and then on his way home on day 2 he has to stop to charge the vehicle because of how far the charging station is in relationship to his home.



What’s kind of cool, when he charges Tesla shows the rate of charge going into the battery pack in miles per hour. Last time he was charging (he usually starts texting me because he’s bored sitting there) he only had a 30 mile range left in the pack. This means he needed to replenish 200 miles to the pack. The charging station was one of the “Super Charger” stations and it was charging at a rate of 200mph so he had an hour to kill waiting on the charge. The charger station can accommodate two vehicles, what he found out is that when a second vehicle plugged in next to him it cut his charge rate in half. At that point he dropped down to 100MPH of charge rate so he had additional time added to his charging session that was unplanned.



When he was done he called me back and said well it only cost me $11.50 for that charge and off he went. After running the numbers it cost him $.086 per mile to drive that distance. If you do the math at 25mpg on the twins that cost would equate out to be $.11 per mile, at 30mpg it would be $.091 per mile, this was based on $2.75 per gallon.



To me I can’t see any reason why someone would want to be so inconvenienced for such little gain. Don’t get me wrong I think the industry is heading in that direction but right now it makes no sense in my mind to own one of these in his particular situation. He paid $13K more for his car then I did for my Z-71 4X4. The battery pack will croak and need to be replaced way before he could ever make any headway on catching up financially for the inconsequential per mile savings.



The sheer inconvenience of sitting around waiting for the charge is crazy especially when there are gas stations on every other corner and in 5 to 7 minutes your pretty much on the road again (with at least double the range) . For me I rub it in every chance I get that I can go almost 5 times the distance on one fuel stop because I have a 36 gallon tank in my truck. Even if I could charge at home it would still be such an undesirable vehicle for me. Traveling would be worthless because of the stress of always worrying about finding charging stations and the sitting there part wasting your time is just not worth it.



Just my 2 cents…..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,252 Posts
The sheer inconvenience of sitting around waiting for the charge is crazy especially when there are gas stations on every other corner and in 5 to 7 minutes your pretty much on the road again (with at least double the range) . For me I rub it in every chance I get that I can go almost 5 times the distance on one fuel stop because I have a 36 gallon tank in my truck. Even if I could charge at home it would still be such an undesirable vehicle for me. Traveling would be worthless because of the stress of always worrying about finding charging stations and the sitting there part wasting your time is just not worth it.
…..
Good date you provide, and your summary states my position.

I could actually probably justify one electric vehicle and one gasser, with charging overnight for free, if the vehicle costs was competitive. My wife and I each commute less than 5 miles to work each day. On a worst case scenario for work, I rarely do over 100 miles in a day, with all my miles within the county. Need the gasser for the longer trips, for hauling/towing, etc.
 
101 - 120 of 128 Posts
Top