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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just got my Colorado and like all new cars, I wanted to pop the hood and look at the goods. I couldn't help but notice I needed windshield wiper fluid so I went in the shed and grabbed a gallon that I had sitting there for about 6 months. When I poured the fluid into the reservoir I noticed a nice sized slime ball had grew in the bottle only after I had effectively poured the contents into the reservoir while screaming, "noooooooo"! What should I do if anything at all?

Thanks!
 

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First... lesson to be learned here. Look inside before using some sitting in the garage collecting dust.


What I will do... grab the garden hose and stick it in the reservoir. Turn the water enough to fill it up and let it overflow. Keep doing it until the water is clear. Then, run the washer until the water is gone from the reservoir and service with fluid.

If you are not expenting freezing weather, leave it until it runs out. Plain tap water will not harm the Winshield Washer System.
 

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First... lesson to be learned here. Look inside before using some sitting in the garage collecting dust.


What I will do... grab the garden hose and stick it in the reservoir. Turn the water enough to fill it up and let it overflow. Keep doing it until the water is clear. Then, run the washer until the water is gone from the reservoir and service with fluid.

If you are not expenting freezing weather, leave it until it runs out. Plain tap water will not harm the Winshield Washer System.
You can also use a siphon hose to remove the clear water.
 

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Or you could just remove the tank, and dump it.

I haven't looked at the tanks on our trucks to see how hard they are to remove. Last time I removed a tank was my 1985 S-10 Blazer that developed a leak. Who knows, on today's vehicles the instructions for removing the windshield washer tank may start like this:

STEP 1: Refer to Chapter 3, BATTERY & CHARGING SYSTEM to disconnect battery, removal of wire harness to the battery, and removal of battery and battery tray.

Step 2: Refer to Chapter 6 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have a 3.6L V6 Engine, Chapter 7 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have the Diesel, and Chapter 8 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have the 4 cylinder gasser.

Step 3: Refer to Chapter 12, SUSPENSION, on removal of the front shocks and to suspend the suspension system in order to access the Windshield Washer Tank.

Step 4: Disconnect wire harness to the Windshield Washer Tank that provides power to the pump and the hose from the pump to the windshield spray nozzle.

Step 5: Remove 4 bolts holding tank to inner fender using 12 MM socket and gently lift tank from engine compartment, being careful to not spill contents.

Step 6: Reverse steps 1-5 in order to reassemble truck.
 
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Or you could just remove the tank, and dump it.

I haven't looked at the tanks on our trucks to see how hard they are to remove. Last time I removed a tank was my 1985 S-10 Blazer that developed a leak. Who knows, on today's vehicles the instructions for removing the windshield washer tank may start like this:

STEP 1: Refer to Chapter 3, BATTERY & CHARGING SYSTEM to disconnect battery, removal of wire harness to the battery, and removal of battery and battery tray.

Step 2: Refer to Chapter 6 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have a 3.6L V6 Engine, Chapter 7 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have the Diesel, and Chapter 8 on REMOVAL OF ENGINE if you have the 4 cylinder gasser.

Step 3: Refer to Chapter 12, SUSPENSION, on removal of the front shocks and to suspend the suspension system in order to access the Windshield Washer Tank.

Step 4: Disconnect wire harness to the Windshield Washer Tank that provides power to the pump and the hose from the pump to the windshield spray nozzle.

Step 5: Remove 4 bolts holding tank to inner fender using 12 MM socket and gently lift tank from engine compartment, being careful to not spill contents.

Step 6: Reverse steps 1-5 in order to reassemble truck.
Haha, I had a 1998 S-10 Blazer with a leaking fluid reservoir. It was pretty straight forward to remove and replace.
 

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Hey question are we suppose to have a low washer fluid warning? I ran out the other day and never got a low fluid warning. First modern vehicle I’ve owned that hasn’t had one.
Not to high jack the thread but seems related since he said he saw it was low.
 

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Hey question are we suppose to have a low washer fluid warning? I ran out the other day and never got a low fluid warning. First modern vehicle I’ve owned that hasn’t had one.
Not to high jack the thread but seems related since he said he saw it was low.
No warning on low level, has been discussed (ad nauseam) before.
 

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Hey question are we suppose to have a low washer fluid warning? I ran out the other day and never got a low fluid warning. First modern vehicle I’ve owned that hasn’t had one.
Not to high jack the thread but seems related since he said he saw it was low.
Just looked in the Manual and nothing is mentioned about washer fluid level warning. My Silverado, Tahoe and Suburbans, of the past, I believe all had washer fluid warnings in the DIC.
 
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Low wiper fluid level alert is now on the '18s.
And it works. My new truck was delivered with an empty reservoir.
I requested the dealer fill it and check all levels. They discovered it was down a half a quart on oil as well.
Can't be too careful... there are slimeballs at the factory too.
 
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Now day cars are a toss up when it comes to features. Nevertheless, does not hurt to open the hood once in a while to check for the obvious. Is a good practice to check under the hood while fueling. That was common when I was a kid. Is funny, you do that now days and people think the vehicle broke down. Most people go get a Slurpy and forget their vehicles.


On my 94 Geo Tracker, the warning for windshield washer fluid has a chime that sounds like....... "Damn it !". Only comes out when is bone dry ;-)
 

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I wouldn't put bleach in my washer fluid holder. It's up to you. :surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah... this was AutoZone brand fluid... never again fellas! It was sitting out in my shed over the summer all be it unopened. I only opened it last week to turn the add fluid light off on my trade in so the dealer wouldn't have to raise flags. But the slime ball was grey and the size of a hotdog bun. I literally saw it go on and froze. So pissed. I guess I can try the dealer if they don't seal with it, then I'll either have to try and unbolt it, clean it out or get a hand pump and drain it dry. Anyone have experience taking the reservoir off?
 

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Duct tape a hose slipped inside a wet/ dry shop vac suction hose. Old style heater hose oughta work. Vac the muck out. Add water to slosh and float any debris out. I'd use a garden hose to break any stuck muck loose. Bottle brush oughta fit inside as well. Repeat rinse and vac till clean. I wouldn't operate the washer w/ any muck in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I apparently duplicated my post in another forum. I want to first apologize for the noob mistake. I tried to navigate the site on my mobile which was just a hell of an experience!

But I did want to also share this interesting find of the occurence of Legionella bacteria in windshield fluid reservoirs! Interesting and potentially dangerous find!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25955695
 

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It does not float. That is how I poured the slime ball in on the first place. It was at the bottom of the windshield washer fluid bottle!

Also, I found this article that identifies windshield washer reservoirs as a place where Legoniella bacteria (responsible for Legionnaire's disease) can harbor and grow!
:surprise::surprise::surprise:
Nice. Our vehicles are out to kill us.

I can only imagine how this gets sucked into the HVAC intake and thrives in the condensate of our AC units.

I remember buying a windshield washer solution that bragged that when you sprayed it on your windshield, the fragrance from it would invade your car and make it smell so sweet.

It's a conspiracy! Now I need a hazardous material mask to wear with my tin foil hat to protect me while driving in my truck.
 
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