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I was not saying that it increases the load rating of the vechicle.
Just saying if you only out 35 lbs in a E rated tire, then the load rating of the tire would be as only having a c rated tire on.

Not saying anything of the vechicle the tire is on.

And yes the pressure from heat is adjusted from tire manufacturers, but I have busted belts in tires, and not due to load a few times, and have not had one since I stayed 5 under when doing higher pressures.
 

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Only inflating tires to 35 psi would not give the load rating.

Say if you had e rated tires and only inflated to 35 lbs, then it is a c load rating on a e tire, will not get the full load rating till you get to the 80 psi + that the tire is rates for.

When I air up for load ratings, I still stay 5 lbs under, due to tire temps rising when going down the road.
I was not saying that it increases the load rating of the vechicle.
Just saying if you only out 35 lbs in a E rated tire, then the load rating of the tire would be as only having a c rated tire on.

Not saying anything of the vechicle the tire is on.
Your wording implies that NOT inflating the tires more than the PSI on the placard would result in the tires not having sufficient load capacity, regardless of tire load range. They were talking about the tires on their truck and the pressures they run at which are sufficient for what the truck is rated for. Doesn't matter if you run LRE tires at 35psi or LRC tires at 35psi, they will both still have enough load capacity for the weights the truck is rated for. As such, no, there is no need to increase the tire pressure to account for the increased load from towing or the tongue weight. Running LRE tires on our trucks at 75PSI would result in an awful ride and those tire pressures can actually be dangerous on lighter vehicles because bumps in the road or rough roads can cause the tires to skip over the pavement and send you right into the ditch.

As I said, start with the placard pressures and go from there, the pressures on the tires are for max load rating and aren't the recommended pressures for all loads. Even running the OEM tires at sidewall pressure is unnecessary because they are rated for well over what the truck's GVWR and GAWRs are. In order to have the proper load capacity and good ride quality the manufacturers use tires that are rated for more than the truck's max weight ratings specifically so they don't have to be run at the max load pressure listed on the tire.

Obviously 3/4-ton and up trucks are different animals, but we're not talking about them here. Only talking about our trucks and as such should be discussing what is pertinent to the person that was asking the question about what they're wanting to tow.

And yes the pressure from heat is adjusted from tire manufacturers, but I have busted belts in tires, and not due to load a few times, and have not had one since I stayed 5 under when doing higher pressures.
Sounds like you've had crappy/cheap tires. Any quality tire wouldn't have that problem...though again, running 5psi under max load pressure listed on the sidewall when the truck isn't loaded or the load doesn't dictate needing those pressures doesn't make sense in the first place. In all my years and with all my vehicles the only time I've ever had tires fail was on a travel trailer 10 years ago when I lost two China Bombs in one day, one due to a pothole and one due to defect (it was the spare used to replace the one that was taken out by a pothole and it failed with about 50-60 miles on it).

Anyhoo, I'm sure they can figure out what will work best for them based on what's been posted.
 
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