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Hey guys, I need your help please. I have a 2016 Z71/2WD Colorado with V6. It also has the tow mode and factory hitch. I understand it’s tow capacity to be 7000 lbs. My question is.... Can we SAFELY tow a 2 horse trailer(2500lbs) with 2 horses(1000-1500 lbs ea). Approx 6000 lbs. My wife will be driving to shows on flat roads in Florida, under 70mph. I am concerned with any sway, transmission issues or other issues that might arise. i might need to move up to a Silverado to tow safely. Thanks for your input.
 

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Livestock towing is a different animal. My late father in law refused to drive 18 wheel cattle trucks because the animals could shift and cause loss of control.

Granted, flat roads in Florida might be less of an issue, but I think I would want a FS truck or a diesel in mid-size.

Others with livestock experience may have better insight.
 

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I would add sway control (a friction damper), and make sure that you have plenty of tongue weight (10-15%) with horses loaded. With the various types of 2 horse trailers there is not really any room for horses to move about as they are cushioned side to side and with the back strap/chain or doors up against their hindquarters (as you know of course). My mom towed a 2 horse many miles over the decades with various station wagons and then a 1/2 ton truck which is pretty equivalent to our mid size trucks. We always were VERY light on brakes and throttle and easy on the turns with the horses, so that naturally makes for an easier tow. So for flat roads you should be OK.
 

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I would add sway control (a friction damper), and make sure that you have plenty of tongue weight (10-15%) with horses loaded.
Tongue weight was my concern. The limit on most our trucks is 770 pounds, and that in turn leads to payload concerns, so that the weight of other things in the truck becomes important. But beyond that, I have no idea what the typical tongue weight would be on a horse trailer.
 

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I kinda figured it would be close to pushing the limits. If it was once or twice, probably ok. But every week might be pushing my luck. Thanks guys, you’re awesome
 

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I kinda figured it would be close to pushing the limits. If it was once or twice, probably ok. But every week might be pushing my luck. Thanks guys, you’re awesome
You could load the trailer up and then do a weigh at a Cat Scale. That would give you front/rear axle weights and trailer weight, and a test pull. But I have no idea how hard it is to get two horses in a trailer. The only thing I can relate it to is horses going into the gates at a race track. Hopefully you'd have a way of getting a tongue weight too.
 

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I would tow that every day, no need to get something you do not need, kind of like the guys telling the landscaper he needs a 3/4 ton truck to haul his zero-turm mower on a 5 x 8 trailer...
 

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I'll bet you anything you are light on that estimated weight. Hay and grain, tack and all the other crap needed for a weekend at a show.

I wouldn't tow that on a bet.
 

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I'll bet you anything you are light on that estimated weight. Hay and grain, tack and all the other crap needed for a weekend at a show.
Which is why I suggested a weigh. Assuming there's a scale somewhere relatively close it would be relatively little risk.

BTW, one more thing I don't know about horse trailers is whether you can use a weight distributing hitch with one. If not, then it's almost certainly out of the Colorado's range.
 

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I will need to re-read the manual, I did not realize it says the tow capacity is 7,000 lbs only if you use a WDH
 

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I could see the payload capacity becoming the issue as much as any of the other limits. Assuming 6K is a good number for the trailer, the typical tingue weight of 10-15% is probaboy going to put you in the 700 pound range at least. I guess a WDH may actually transfer some of that to the front axle, but all of these calculations make it difficult to actually tow at the listed max tow capacity.

I tend to adhere to the JAWS philosophy of towing: "I think we need a bigger truck (boat)."
 

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I could see the payload capacity becoming the issue as much as any of the other limits. Assuming 6K is a good number for the trailer, the typical tingue weight of 10-15% is probaboy going to put you in the 700 pound range at least. I guess a WDH may actually transfer some of that to the front axle, but all of these calculations make it difficult to actually tow at the listed max tow capacity.
If I recall correctly they say for calculating payload to include all of the tongue weight even if using a WDH. But without a WDH all that weight will be pretty much on the rear axle, possibly exceeding its weight limit. With a WDH some of it will go forward to the front axle and some of it back to the trailer axle. I think the reason you include all of the tongue weight though is that at times (e.g. cresting a hill, bumps, etc.) the WDH won't be transferring as much weight as other times.

But yes, on the diesels at least payload is often the critical number.
 

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This has some interesting discussion and calculation of tongue weight that might be helpful

 

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FWIW, I tow our steel 2-horse trailer with tack and changing room with my truck, has a GVWR of 7,700LB but it's not near that weight. I'd say the trailer + horses were 5,000-6,000LB and my truck had a much easier time towing that trailer than our 5,000LB travel trailer. I also don't use a WDH or sway control with the horse trailer, not needed in my case. Very happy with this combo, but I also have the diesel and the long-bed so my experience will obviously be a bit different but I don't think you'll have an issue.

393332
 

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We used to tow 2- horse trailers all over the province(B.C.) , with 1985 GMC 1/2 ton with 350 V8 , as did everyone back then, did the job just fine.
Now we do it with our Canyon long box diesel with even more confidence than the old full size.. My truck has more payload and power, better brakes and steering than any 1\2 ton prior to 1999.
We also tow a full size 6000 lb travel trailer gvwr of 7650, all over the mountains with our Canyon. No problems at all. I use WD hitch for TT but not for the much shorter, lower, more aerodynamic horse hauler.
 
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Hey guys, I need your help please. I have a 2016 Z71/2WD Colorado with V6. It also has the tow mode and factory hitch. I understand it’s tow capacity to be 7000 lbs. My question is.... Can we SAFELY tow a 2 horse trailer(2500lbs) with 2 horses(1000-1500 lbs ea). Approx 6000 lbs. My wife will be driving to shows on flat roads in Florida, under 70mph. I am concerned with any sway, transmission issues or other issues that might arise. i might need to move up to a Silverado to tow safely. Thanks for your input.
It all depend on the hoses as well as the trailer. I think there isn’t any problem because you have 4x4 but if you didn’t , no way. To lite in the ass.
 

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Hi All....Looking for some advice regarding Tires & Towing.

I have a 2018 V6 Colorado LT 4x4 SBCC with factory tow package & installed brake controller, and have just ordered a new travel trailer with 3550 lbs dry and 4700 lbs GVWR. I am also getting a WDH with sway control, so I am pretty sure the weight shouldn't be an issue.
However, I have OEM 18" tires (265 60R18 I think) that have a door sticker inflation of 35 PSI and a max cold inflation of 50 PSI.
Should I be inflating the tires to the max (or near the max) when pulling this trailer?
I think with the tongue & trailer weight the tires would be too soft and too bouncy a ride at only 35 PSI.

Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I would raise them to 40-45ish and see how it handles just depends on the tongue weight with the wdh
 

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Since you have everything already, just hook up and you will see just how it does, and can watch trans temps.

Slant trailers always pulled better for me than pull in, the horses never moved around near as much, which helped pull better.

I pulled a diamond d, 5 horse slant to shows many times, behind a 94 ram 1500 2wd, with e tires and airbags, and front tack room and nose packed full and loaded down .
But also a gooseneck.


I have OEM 18" tires (265 60R18 I think) that have a door sticker inflation of 35 PSI and a max cold inflation of 50 PSI.
Should I be inflating the tires to the max (or near the max) when pulling this trailer?
I think with the tongue & trailer weight the tires would be too soft and too bouncy a ride at only 35 PSI.

Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks!
Only inflating tires to 35 psi would not give the load rating.

Say if you had e rated tires and only inflated to 35 lbs, then it is a c load rating on a e tire, will not get the full load rating till you get to the 80 psi + that the tire is rates for.

When I air up for load ratings, I still stay 5 lbs under, due to tire temps rising when going down the road.
 

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Only inflating tires to 35 psi would not give the load rating.

Say if you had e rated tires and only inflated to 35 lbs, then it is a c load rating on a e tire, will not get the full load rating till you get to the 80 psi + that the tire is rates for.

When I air up for load ratings, I still stay 5 lbs under, due to tire temps rising when going down the road.
You’re quite a bit off in your assumptions and understanding of pressures and load ratings.

The PSI listed on the door jamb will absolutely provide the necessary load capacity for the truck’s GVWR. There is no need to increase the tire pressure above that when hauling a load or towing a trailer. The pressures listed on the tires is the pressure needed for the max load listed on the tire’s sidewall, not the max load listed on the tire placard on the truck since tire manufacturers have no idea what vehicle the tires will be put on.

Also, the pressures listed on the tires are cold pressures, not maximum pressures. If the tires say 50psi cold then you don’t need to account for increases in pressure from heat, the tire manufacturers have already done that. If you fill to 50psi when the tires are cold the tire manufacturer knows full well that the pressure will increase from heat as you drive.

So, start at the pressure listed on the tire placard on the truck and go from there depending on how the truck handles and rides.


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