Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this months Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

First, my appogies for such a long post.

I've spent a fair amount of time reading and reaching out to members on their setup and have completely confused myself, I think :(

I want to build up my Canyon AT into an overland vehicle and one of my main objectives is to run a 32.5 inch tire to maximize ground clearance. Since its multi use I want to try and maintain good road manners.

By reading the info here, it appears that the people running coilovers have also had to do a body lift or some sort of modification to the front wheel wells which adds to the overall cost. I definately want to add Superskidz #1 - 3, so those are already factored into my budget.

The Front:
From my reading, it seems that we need atleast 3 inches upfront to clear tires nearing or over 32 inches. I already have a Zone leveling kit and was wondering if I can combine that with something like the Eibach or Bilstein shocks set at 2 inches. That would give me 3.25 inches upfront.

Since the Zone leveling spacer sits on top of the assembly it wouldn't preload the shock. Would this work??? What other issues would this cause that I am not thinking of?? Is this approach just crappy or viable considering I need to retain decent road manners on pavement.

Alternatively I know AutoSpring has a 2.5" levelling kit and ICON's coilover system claims to have a 3 inch heigth setting...but the ICONs are darn expensive.

I would do a differential drop to relax CV angles and I beleive from reading that the AutoSpring diff drop still leaves enough room for a Superskid plate.



The Rear:
Can someone explain the pros/cons of a spacer block versus an add a leaf?? The spacer seems so simple in its solution, but my gut tells me to go with an add a leaf...I dunno why though.

If i can use the set up mentioned for the front, I beleive a 1.5 inch lift in the rear would be needed to keep things level. Is that a valid assessment?? I know that both Bilstein and Eibach offer rear shocks which are recommended for 0-1" lift. I assume I will need something else if I go to 1.5 inch in the rear???? Any recommendations on what I should be doing here?


Any info on pointing me towards a reasonably priced set up would be greatly appreciated. The 3 skid plates will be about $855 and I was hoping to get my ride all set up for $3,000 or less so that leaves about $2,200 for suspension and tires.

Thank you, George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hey there bub,

I would recommend investing in the icon kit or even contacting a few other companies. Total Chaos, and dirt kings both produce some upper control arms for the Colorado/canyons these are rebuildable so you never need to replace a complete control arm and they add in extra caster so when you lift the vehicle you can still get the best driving response from the steering.

In terms of the shocks: after market coilovers (king, fox, race runner, dirt logic, icon, f-o-a) are by far your better choice over your cheap alternatives for several reasons:
1. They are rebuildable, so for what you pay in shocks, you never have to buy shocks again, all the components swap out, when they blow you tear them down and swap out rubber gaskets and you are good to go.
2. You can revalve and adjust compression and rebound to accommodate your particular style of driving. Similar to the ZR2 style shocks, the position of the shock shaft will have a particular flow rate for the fluid to pass through. Each position of the shocks movement can be tuned.
3. You have a pretty limitless amount of spring rates to select so as you go on with your build if you add more weight you won't need to through your shocks out or suffer bad driving characteristics.

You don't need to go all out with remote reservoirs but I do recommend upgrading to external compression adjustments on any shocks so you can adjust according to road conditions on the fly

With the above setup you should be able to get about 2.75". You will be limited to that amount anyways because of CV angles. You might be able to squeeze 3" but will most likely require the upper control arms to correct alignment angles.

If you want more than 3" look into the drop bracket kits. Not the best for off reading, but will get you higher.

And with the block lift in the rear, it's a cheap way of getting lift, but be weary if you plan on loading the bed down and doing some significant off roading. It can be used in the short term but blocks cause excess axle wrap when you begin to apply torque( the excessive hop you get in the rear). Invest into some good leafsprings from Deaver, Alcan, or National. These will be progressive rated springs that are tuned to the weight of your vehicle. Again if this is all for a true purpose built vehicle and you're wanting to go distance off the beaten path, investing into parts that are meant for that punishment is cheaper in the long run than buying parts meant to look good.

Take things in bits though and replace things only when you need to: lift blocks, coil spacers and bilsteins will be fine for the next couple years, save up for your control arms because that's about how long they will last lifted to the max. Get the coilovers and rear leafs the following year, some bypass shocks in the rear the year after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
One of the things to consider.
Is the extra 1/4 inch under the axle or under the front diff, really a huge difference? The 32 inch tire in most configurations(unless the really wide tires, greater than 265's) seem to fit with only a leveling kit(from what I have read, I have a 235/80/17 on eight inch rim currently, and have no issues(with a 1.25 leveling kit). The michelin LTX m/s for summer, and the duratrac 235/80/17 as well, for winter, I have even run 265/70/17 with no issues), personally I tend to run a narrow tire than most(I really wish I could find some 7 inch wide aluminum rims for my truck, I would then run 235 the right way). Pushing for a 32.5 may not really be necessary, again is really a 1/4 inch in tire height gain that big a deal. Yes, I know the dura trac is 31.8, which again gives a bit less clearance. than a true 32(1/10" under the tire difference). So again, I give up about 3/8 under the lowest part of the truck(over a 32.5). For the most part, I can usually pick a line on a trail to get me away from the rocks for that 1/4" to 3/8" .
Simple question, Where are you wanting to go that the extra 1/4 to 3/8inch under the lowest part will prevent you from getting to? For me, rocks and other things can be stacked under a tire to get me places. Some people carry Mattrax or something similar. Me I use what is around me.
Also the higher the lift in the front, the lower you tires will droop, or drop on a road. Not allowing some travel that was engineered into the suspension. So by leveling my truck up 1.25", I now have less travel in the downward position.

Anyhow, before some people comment on my tire selections, I use the Michelins for high way, beach, dirt, two trac, and some light rock work with great success, favorite multi use tire. The Duratrac's are my favorite tread pattern to date, for harder off road and winter(I am 60 year young) for most other things(even my land cruiser, I would have a set of the LTX's on my cruiser as well, if they made bigger than 33", I like a 36 for it).
More food for thought
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys for this information. It is definitely helpful in understanding this stuff especially for a newbie like myself. Sometimes when you read so much ya get overwhelmed and need to talk it through.


For now I've decided to go with either 265/70/17 or 255/75/17 and see if I get by with just the leveling kit. My overlanding right now are all day trips so I don't really have to carry a lot of gear. just enough to get me through the day and back home.


As I do more of this, I will start upgrading with the recommendations you guys touched upon.


Thank you


George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Thanks guys for this information. It is definitely helpful in understanding this stuff especially for a newbie like myself. Sometimes when you read so much ya get overwhelmed and need to talk it through.


For now I've decided to go with either 265/70/17 or 255/75/17 and see if I get by with just the leveling kit. My overlanding right now are all day trips so I don't really have to carry a lot of gear. just enough to get me through the day and back home.


As I do more of this, I will start upgrading with the recommendations you guys touched upon.


Thank you


George
go with the 255/75/17. slightly taller and from the tires I looked at were a bit cheaper and lighter. I am running 265/70/17 for reference and haven't been incredibly satisfied with the size (that's what she said?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Thanks guys for this information. It is definitely helpful in understanding this stuff especially for a newbie like myself. Sometimes when you read so much ya get overwhelmed and need to talk it through.


For now I've decided to go with either 265/70/17 or 255/75/17 and see if I get by with just the leveling kit. My overlanding right now are all day trips so I don't really have to carry a lot of gear. just enough to get me through the day and back home.


As I do more of this, I will start upgrading with the recommendations you guys touched upon.


Thank you


George
That would be a good approach, get the largest tires possible, sounds like the 255's. Invest in some max tracks and recovery gear before you start dishing out on Suspension upgrades.

And tip from experience:
1. you'll pay off a winch after the first time you need it. You don't have to commit to an overkill bumper either, hook up a front mount hitch and a rear tow hitch. You can then use a winch with a hitch cradle to pull from the front or rear.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top