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Knowing what you know about your truck, would you purchase it all over again?

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everyone. I thought I posted something this morning introducing myself but I can't find it so I'm going to do this again.

I am a not so proud owner of a 2021 Ford Ranger Tremor. I traded in a 2019 Ranger XLT Sport for the Tremor. I bought the XLT used with 7000 miles on it and I put 10,000 on it by the time I traded it. The only issue I had with the XLT was the BCM (body control module) I drove from Central Florida to northern Georgia and back in two days, I parked the truck in my garage and the next morning my garage reeks of gasoline and oil. I could smell it through the grill of the truck. I'll pop the hood and check my oil level where the smell was very strong. My oil level was almost 2 inches high and ran off the dipstick like watered down oil. I babied this truck until I broke it in at 1000 miles. There's about 2700 miles on it.
I took it to the dealership and the service manager confirmed that it was indeed fuel in the oil and gave me a free oil change and scheduled me for service. He said they only had one of these before and Ford replaced some things on it but didn't really know what to do with it because they didn't know what caused it and so therefore they didn't know how to fix something that they didn't know the cause of.
They've had the truck for a week now so I stopped by yesterday with the loaner car they graciously loaned me. He said he put a call into the hotline and have not heard back from them. He doesn't know what they will do since they were unable to fix the first truck which ended up being a buyback through the lemon law.
So that's why I am here on this forum to see how you guys feel about your Colorado's and Canyons. I have to decide if I'm moving on from the Ford Ranger to Colorado or Canyon if I have to make Ford buy this truck back. On the Ranger 5G website there are a number of people that have had these issues and only a few that have no more issues with the fuel in the oil.
What are your likes and dislikes about your Colorado's and Canyons?
Thank you in advance for everyone who posts a reply.
 

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Depends on your usage.

My peeves about the Colorado are largely superficial i.e. the raked stance (although by design), hard to add larger tires beyond a point without hacking up the vehicle and those low hanging rear shocks .

Apart from that , they are generally reliable . The 8 speed transmission on the gasoline versions should have been sorted out by now (via the new fluid ).

The diesels are unique to this segment in North America , but have a tiny chance of blowing up :) . As long as they don't , they are generally ok, not withstanding all the emissions crap .. which is getting harder to "get rid of", .. if that matters to you. Awesome power and mpg

Not as much aftermarket support as jeeps , Tacoma's or even rangers ..if that matters to you .
 

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My vote ignores current market prices, but the Colorado Duramax remains the only pickup truck that fits my needs: (1) It needs to fit in my garage; and (2) It needs to have well over 200 miles range towing a travel trailer. None of the full size trucks meet the first, and none of the midsize trucks meet the second (I get 250-300 miles range with the Duramax).

The things I don't like are fairly minor, mainly poorly designed interior controls apparently designed by complete morons (sorry to insult the morons), bizarre transmission programming (shifting to L or M may or may not downshift the transmission depending on the gear it's in, but the downshift to 2 is a bitch!), poor visibility due to the design of the rear door windows and truck rake, and finally, no dead pedal.
 

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If you can stand our semi-off topic tangents, there was a similar thread a couple weeks back:


If I were to sum it up:
  • There is no one size fits all truck
  • The 2nd Gen Colorado has been out for 6 years now and issues have arisen during that time, which I will call "known" issues. The Ranger has only been out for 2 years and there could be issues still unknown. Not knocking against either, the Ranger could have far less issues.

I'd buy my diesel Colorado all over again. Perhaps buying a new diesel Bison would mean I wouldn't need to build the truck in certain ways like I have, but I certainly enjoy the process (planning, buying/owning the tools, doing the work, etc...)

My top 3 favorites:
  • Diesel
  • 4AUTO
  • Comfort
  • (These forums)

My top 3 dislikes:
  • 4wd knob location
  • Rear shock lower mounts
  • Front fascia

Comfort is very subjective, I know. Apparently I'm of the body size/proportions the truck was modelled around (6'0, 200#, male) because others have not found it as comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Depends on your usage.

My peeves about the Colorado are largely superficial i.e. the raked stance (although by design), hard to add larger tires beyond a point without hacking up the vehicle and those low hanging rear shocks .

Apart from that , they are generally reliable . The 8 speed transmission on the gasoline versions should have been sorted out by now (via the new fluid ).

The diesels are unique to this segment in North America , but have a tiny chance of blowing up :) . As long as they don't , they are generally ok, not withstanding all the emissions crap .. which is getting harder to "get rid of", .. if that matters to you. Awesome power and mpg

Not as much aftermarket support as jeeps , Tacoma's or even rangers ..if that matters to you .
The Rangers come with that rake also. Apparently that's what gives them the 7500 pound towing capacity. A lot of us have leveled the truck off with either coil over strut lifts or 2 1/2 inch Rough Country Spacer lifts like I've done. It works on the Tremor version but I wouldn't want to use them on an XLT or an XL model. On my '19 XLT Sport I used Bilstein 5100 adjustable struts on the front and I replaced the rears with regular Bilstein 5100's because those trucks come very very bouncy with Ford shocks and struts. No issue with the Tremor edition because they come with the Fox's.
That's after the 2 1/2" lift on a Tremor. no ride difference. The Ford mechanic said he had to ride it over a few hard bumps to release the stiffness out once he raised it. Tires are stock 265/70/17. Don't have a before pic.
Wheel Tire Land vehicle Vehicle Car
 

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2019 zr2 gas crew cab. Avs aeroskin hood guard and hs2 havoc step bars. Weather tech splash guards
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I bought a new 2013 f150 with the 3.5 Ecoboost. It had what sounds like the same problem and it was resolved with a new set of direct injection fuel injectors. One was failing open and relieving residual fuel rail pressure into the cylinder when the engine was shut off. I had to argue a bit to get them to replace the entire set of injectors, but they finally conceded. It didn't do it again in the time I had it after that fix.
 

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If it is (or was) an injector leaking into a cylinder a real concern is also if the piston is on compression stroke it will (almost or actually) hydraulic lock as another cylinder fires and either blow the head gasket out or bend or break a rod. If it bends the rod it may run OK but compression will be permanently reduced in that cylinder. All kinds of bad things can happen to an engine with that much fuel leaking internally
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think it's purely style, not function.
Not trying to bust your balls, but that's not exactly correct.
It's so that the truck will sit more level when you're towing a trailer or have the bed filled. Wait on the back end of the truck lift the front end. Ever noticed some of these trucks that have a heavy load in the front end is pointing up in the sky? The rake is supposed to eliminate that.

Although there is definitely more weight up front, trucks actually sit lower in the front due to “rake” from the factory; This allows for the truck to sit level with a loaded bed or a trailer hooked up. Installing a Leveling Kit counteracts the factory rake and allows the truck to sit evenly when unloaded.
Ford Ranger rake reason - Google Search
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
If it is (or was) an injector leaking into a cylinder a real concern is also if the piston is on compression stroke it will (almost or actually) hydraulic lock as another cylinder fires and either blow the head gasket out or bend or break a rod. If it bends the rod it may run OK but compression will be permanently reduced in that cylinder. All kinds of bad things can happen to an engine with that much fuel leaking internally
That's my greatest concern especially since I drove it for about 14 hours at interstellar interstate speeds. 👀
 

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Not trying to bust your balls, but that's not exactly correct.
It's so that the truck will sit more level when you're towing a trailer or have the bed filled. Wait on the back end of the truck lift the front end. Ever noticed some of these trucks that have a heavy load in the front end is pointing up in the sky? The rake is supposed to eliminate that.
If by these trucks you mean Colorados, no I've never seen that, or even them appearing level when towing/loaded due to the starting rake. They don't squat that much when hooked up (also WDHs tend to lower the front end back down). For weight in the bed, that would mainly lower the rear, and trucks existed for decades that could carry heavy loads without the extreme rake of today's trucks. The manufacturers just think it adds style, IMHO.

But if you're right, are you saying that trucks that have been leveled will point skyward when loaded up?

BTW, your Google link is mainly to other forums like this, so really doesn't answer the question.
 

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That's my greatest concern especially since I drove it for about 14 hours at I I interstellar interstate speeds. 👀
You would have known immediately if it had been hydrolocked with fuel. At the rate that an injector would leak, it would have time to leak past the piston rings and on to the oil pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If by these trucks you mean Colorados, no I've never seen that, or even them appearing level when towing/loaded due to the starting rake. They don't squat that much when hooked up (also WDHs tend to lower the front end back down). For weight in the bed, that would mainly lower the rear, and trucks existed for decades that could carry heavy loads without the extreme rake of today's trucks. The manufacturers just think it adds style, IMHO.

But if you're right, are you saying that trucks that have been leveled will point skyward when loaded up?

BTW, your Google link is mainly to other forums like this, so really doesn't answer the question.
Oh sorry about the link. I guess I posted the wrong link. Anyway you can Google the question and see it but for the Ranger, at least that is what the reason is for. They claim it changes the towing capacity.
When I pulled up to a trucking place with my '19, two of the mechanics were outside and commented, "that thing must have one hell of a towing capacity because of that rake." "That's where I first got it from and then the dealership told me that was the reason for the rake. It may be different for the GM/Chevy, so I don't know.
Not the trucks that have been leveled point skyward when loaded up but the ones that come stock like that. I've seen so much tongue weight on a truck that it look like it was going skyward. When low beam headlights on a truck blind you in your rearview mirror when you're sitting on a lifted truck, you know they've got some weight on that tongue. It happened to me one time. I felt like I didn't have a lot of weight on those front wheels and had to be careful of my handling. Turning was really awkward. It was years ago on an F150 and I can't even remember what I was towing, I just remember the experience. I see it on pickup trucks towing trailers loaded with mowers and other gear. Some of them just don't seem to be made for the heavy loads on those trailers.
I'm really happy with the way I see the poll going as for you current owners as to whether or not you would purchase your same vehicles again knowing ahead of time what you know now about them. It looks like I may be doing some good test driving on those vehicles for the comparison and maybe switching over.
Thanks for your input. Take care and be safe!

If by these trucks you mean Colorados, no I've never seen that, or even them appearing level when towing/loaded due to the starting rake. They don't squat that much when hooked up (also WDHs tend to lower the front end back down). For weight in the bed, that would mainly lower the rear, and trucks existed for decades that could carry heavy loads without the extreme rake of today's trucks. The manufacturers just think it adds style, IMHO. I think I've seen a few links that give witness to what you're saying, especially about the Colorados.

But if you're right, are you saying that trucks that have been leveled will point skyward when loaded up?

BTW, your Google link is mainly to other forums like this, so really doesn't answer the question.
 

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I've seen so much tongue weight on a truck that it look like it was going skyward. When low beam headlights on a truck blind you in your rearview mirror when you're sitting on a lifted truck, you know they've got some weight on that tongue.
Increased rake doesn't change that because the headlights are aimed based on the stock level of the truck. If you change the level in the rear down the headlights will aim further up, no matter the starting angle. The only way to change that is to have stronger rear springs.

Which may be a second reason for the increased rake in today's trucks. A more car-like ride using softer springs. The reality today is that many people who buy trucks don't really need or want trucks, and almost never use them as trucks. So they don't want the ride quality of a truck.
 

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My vote ignores current market prices, but the Colorado Duramax remains the only pickup truck that fits my needs: (1) It needs to fit in my garage; and (2) It needs to have well over 200 miles range towing a travel trailer. None of the full size trucks meet the first, and none of the midsize trucks meet the second (I get 250-300 miles range with the Duramax).

The things I don't like are fairly minor, mainly poorly designed interior controls apparently designed by complete morons (sorry to insult the morons), bizarre transmission programming (shifting to L or M may or may not downshift the transmission depending on the gear it's in, but the downshift to 2 is a bitch!), poor visibility due to the design of the rear door windows and truck rake, and finally, no dead pedal.
I agree with all of this. I had a 2016 Z71 CCLB Duramax. I put a lot of miles on that truck, in all kinds of conditions. I liked it so much, I bought another one just like it last year. Love this truck. For me, it's the best one on the market. Not perfect, but best available.

Some of the dislikes can be handled pretty easily. My towing range is about 600 miles or so. My empty traveling range is almost 1,000 miles. I added a bigger fuel tank. :)

A dead pedal is easy to build and install.

Rear visibility is pretty poor. I use the camera a lot to see small cars tailgating me.

But, you're exactly right. The interior leaves a little bit to be desired. They should take a close look at Ram.
 

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I should probably add that this really is dependent on use. My reason for buying a new truck was towing. If it was off-road my concerns would have been different, although even there the tiny 19 gallon gas tank on the Ranger might have bothered me depending on where I was going off road.
 

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I'm confused, OP, in one sentence you say you had a XLT and only problem was the BCM and when you got home you smelled gas
How about the Tremor, something wrong with it or was the fuel issue in the Tremor?
==================================================================

The Tremor comes with a 2 inch lift and is rated 5mpg less then the XLT due to the lift, 24 vs 19 , which is a little less then the WT LT Z71 etc of the Colorado compared to the ZR2/Bison 24 vs 18

So if looking at Colorado/Canyons and want a nice ride, on/off road, I would look at the Canyon AT4X, Colorado ZR2 (which both come lifted) or a regular ride, the Colorado LT and Canyon AT4 and install a lift of some sorts.

if towing the ATX4 and ZR2 has a 5000 tow rating compared to 7,000 of the 3.6 V6
 
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My only real complain with my ZR2 is it doesn't have adaptive cruise control. Once you get used to it you miss it when you don't have it. Also, does not have auto windshield wipers which is kinda nice. Minor complaints, the head lights and 4wd switches are in a stupid place, lights are not great (fixed with better bulbs), wireless charging pad is too small, upgraded Bose sound system does not come with a subwoofer... Minor nit-picky things.
 
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