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Hey all,

I have a set of the longer peak tie rod sleeves. looking at them it seems like I could cut them down to the “shorty” size. Anybody done this before? Think it’s worth it?

Thanks for the help y’all


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I cut my MA sleeves to 3", the length of the GM sleeve.
 

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Why would you want to? The purpose of the longer sleeve is protect the tie rod. If you already own the long ones, why not use them?
To keep the weak point in the tie rod and not move it to another point more difficult/expensive to repair.
 

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To keep the weak point in the tie rod and not move it to another point more difficult/expensive to repair.
OK, I'm not understanding this. I'm not being a dick, or argumentative. I just don't understand it.
The sleeve has threads at the lateral end, to take the place of the lock nut. The medial end is hollow, and goes over shaft of the inner tie rod end. Is that correct? Wouldn't the medial end protect the middle of the tie rod? from a direct strike?
No matter where you break the inner tie rod, the fix is the same.
 

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OK, I'm not understanding this. I'm not being a dick, or argumentative. I just don't understand it.
The sleeve has threads at the lateral end, to take the place of the lock nut. The medial end is hollow, and goes over shaft of the inner tie rod end. Is that correct? Wouldn't the medial end protect the middle of the tie rod? from a direct strike?
No matter where you break the inner tie rod, the fix is the same.
I hear ya. I'm not a mechanical engineer, and never played one on TV (levity intended). In many areas, this being one, I know enough to know how much I don't know - by that I mean that I cannot explain it in accurate physics/mechanical engineering nomenclature. I've been on this forum long enough to have a sense of how knowledgeable you are - much of this explanation is for other readers.

Short tie rod sleeves are a mitigating measure, not a preventative, that raise the threshold required to break the inner tie rod.

The shortened tie rod sleeve strengthens the weak point so that it is not as weak as it is without the tie rod sleeve in place. This enables drivers to push boundaries more than they could without the sleeves. Being an IFS vehicle with great capabilities enough people have found the upper limits.
Once the upper threshold of force is attained for the shorter sleeve that is where the break will still occur - again, it just takes more force to do so than without the sleeve. In managing and maintaining the break to that area it mitigates the severity of damage that could occur (damage control) to the steering system.

If the sleeves are too long (or too strong), they strengthen that area enough that when those boundaries are pushed the steering rack is at risk. Tie rods can be replaced in the field relatively quickly and are not expensive. If the steering rack is damaged severely enough the vehicle is going to need to be recovered (towed) out from wherever they are. Even if the damage is minimal to the steering rack, it is compromised and will require service (replacing most likely) and is going to be significantly more expensive and time consuming.
 

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2018 Kinetic Blue Ex-Cab ZR2 V6
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It's a massive debate with minimal data. Lots of speculation and theories, but the facts are that two people broke racks and blamed the long sleeves instead of their driving habits in very extreme rock crawling scenarios. Now half the population is convinced that having a marginally stronger tie rod is the answer. Two people. There have been more diesel engine failures. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Additionally, most folks break the tie rod at the threads or near the joint, where it tapers down. The size of sleeve doesn't matter. It will cover the threads, but the next weak point is the taper, not the middle.

Leave it or cut them. There is no real data to confirm you gain or lose anything.

FWIW, I run a solid 1" AL bar with a 5/8" heim as my inner tie rod. Zero concern about breaking a rack and zero concern about breaking/bending a tie rod. I've also taken some wicked hits and was glad I had the upgrade.
 

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It's a massive debate with minimal data. Lots of speculation and theories, but the facts are that two people broke racks and blamed the long sleeves instead of their driving habits in very extreme rock crawling scenarios. Now half the population is convinced that having a marginally stronger tie rod is the answer. Two people. There have been more diesel engine failures. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Additionally, most folks break the tie rod at the threads or near the joint, where it tapers down. The size of sleeve doesn't matter. It will cover the threads, but the next weak point is the taper, not the middle.

Leave it or cut them. There is no real data to confirm you gain or lose anything.

FWIW, I run a solid 1" AL bar with a 5/8" heim as my inner tie rod. Zero concern about breaking a rack and zero concern about breaking/bending a tie rod. I've also taken some wicked hits and was glad I had the upgrade.
"I run a solid 1" AL bar with a 5/8" heim as my inner tie rod."
May I as what brand and where did you purchase them.
thanks
 

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"I run a solid 1" AL bar with a 5/8" heim as my inner tie rod."
May I as what brand and where did you purchase them.
thanks
It's a custom setup I spec'd myself with a Dirt King Clevis. Had a local machine shop work the bar, then I assembled.
 

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It's a massive debate with minimal data. Lots of speculation and theories, but the facts are that two people broke racks and blamed the long sleeves instead of their driving habits in very extreme rock crawling scenarios. Now half the population is convinced that having a marginally stronger tie rod is the answer. Two people. There have been more diesel engine failures. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Additionally, most folks break the tie rod at the threads or near the joint, where it tapers down. The size of sleeve doesn't matter. It will cover the threads, but the next weak point is the taper, not the middle.

Leave it or cut them. There is no real data to confirm you gain or lose anything.

FWIW, I run a solid 1" AL bar with a 5/8" heim as my inner tie rod. Zero concern about breaking a rack and zero concern about breaking/bending a tie rod. I've also taken some wicked hits and was glad I had the upgrade.
Good point regarding the tie rod speculation, and it seems like you took the right path for your use.

I chose to go the short tie rod sleeve route due to the GM Performance Tie Rod Sleeves. While it is clear GM over charges for their 'Performance Parts', their testing has been on the Hall truck.
Quote from the Rod Hall Racing website regarding the GM Performance Tie Rod Sleeve '...Tested and validated in extreme off road races, '. So there is that as a data point. Dismiss it or use it, everyone is free to choose.

 
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