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So I changed my own oil today for the first time in this truck. I’ve always changed my own oil bit I bought this 2.8L canyon new so I wanted to let the dealer handle the changes. In light of work being slow with this virus going around I decided I’d do the job myself to save about $40. Oddest thing happened. I pulled the plug. Oil starts draining. I proceed to remove and change the oil filter atop the engine. Complete that. Check the Drain plug and see it’s slow dripping so I give it a few minutes to assure it’s drained. Replug. Refil engine oil. 6 quarts. Well I go to poor the drained oil from the catch into the 5qt oil container and notice it’s on 1.5 quarts! This can’t be right I say to myself. So I check the oil stick and sure enough there’s black oil on the stick still, and it’s about 1 inch above the oil meter.. so I unplug the drain pan, jack the truck up in the front roughly 8 inches and it begin drainage slowly again for another QT. I was about 4,000 over the service miles but it’s all highway miles. Am I over filling this vehicle with oil? Why is so little oil draining? Or am I burning more oil than I thought by going past the service miles? Any advice appreciated
 

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Are you sure you're pulling the oil pan plug? Of the top of my head I can't imagine what else it would be. Transfer case?
 

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That's about the amount that would drain from the transmission check port with the engine not running. Raising the front of the truck would likely drain another quart as the check port is in the back of the pan.

Can the OP provide a photo of the plug that was removed?
 

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Probably should mention the oil plug points down.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's about the amount that would drain from the transmission check port with the engine not running. Raising the front of the truck would likely drain another quart as the check port is in the back of the pan.

Can the OP provide a photo of the plug that was removed?
YOURE EXACTLY RIGHT AND I AM AN IDIOT.. I was in such a hurry to get this done I paid no attention. Now looking for the transmission refill I notice there is not a traditional spot under the hood. I’m assuming it has to actually be pumped into the trans it self. Trip to the dealership after all 🤦🏼‍♂️ Good lord
 

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I am too lazy to slide under and take a photo so I'll do this. The engine oil pan is the bottom element in this photo. It is a black oval-ish deep drawn sheet metal pan that bolts up to the larger aluminum upper part of the oil pan. The drain plug is on the bottom of this drawn pan. This is all located ahead of the bell housing.



The transmission pan is a larger rectangular-ish pan that is located behind the bell housing. Here is mine as pulled for a fluid drain/fill. You can see the stand-pipe located at the rear (left) of the pan. This is used to check fluid level at temperature with the engine running.


I see now that the trans is what you drained. Here is what you need to do:

1) Drain engine oil back to the correct level. You need to run the engine to check ATF level and you don't want to do that with the engine over filled.

2) Pick up 3 quarts of Dexron6, a funnel and 4 or 5 ft of tube around 5/8" OD.

3) Locate the fill plug above the right hand side pan mounting lip on the trans casting. Pop the center button on the plug up with a screwdriver or something to unlock the plug. The plug should pull out straight up fairly easily. Feed the tube down through the engine bay to the fill port. Use the funnel and tube to pour the 3 quarts of Dexron6 into the trans. The trans will now be about 0.5qt over-filled. That's ok for now.

4) Set the park brake, chock the wheels and start the engine. Shift through the gears at idle while holding the brake pedal and return to park. Monitor ATF temperature on the DIC. When the ATF reaches about 40C/104F slide under the truck with the engine still idling. Pull the ATF drain and let fluid drain down to the top of the stand pipe. When flow slows to a trickle you are there. Install the plug. Shut off the engine.

5) Now you can change your engine oil.

6) Go forth and enjoy your truck!
 

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2) Pick up 3 quarts of Dexron6, a funnel and 4 or 4 ft of tube around 5/8" OD.
There are apparently two types of ACDelco Dexron6. One a blend and one full synthetic. Supposedly our trucks are filled with the full synthetic stuff, but either way I'd look for a full synthetic product.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am too lazy to slide under and take a photo so I'll do this. The engine oil pan is the bottom element in this photo. It is a black oval-ish deep drawn sheet metal pan that bolts up to the larger aluminum upper part of the oil pan. The drain plug is on the bottom of this drawn pan. This is all located ahead of the bell housing.



The transmission pan is a larger rectangular-ish pan that is located behind the bell housing. Here is mine as pulled for a fluid drain/fill. You can see the stand-pipe located at the rear (left) of the pan. This is used to check fluid level at temperature with the engine running.


I see now that the trans is what you drained. Here is what you need to do:

1) Drain engine oil back to the correct level. You need to run the engine to check ATF level and you don't want to do that with the engine over filled.

2) Pick up 3 quarts of Dexron6, a funnel and 4 or 4 ft of tube around 5/8" OD.

3) Locate the fill plug above the right hand side pan mounting lip on the trans casting. Pop the center button on the plug up with a screwdriver or something to unlock the plug. The plug should pull out straight up fairly easily. Feed the tube down through the engine bay to the fill port. Use the funnel and tube to pour the 3 quarts of Dexron6 into the trans. The trans will now be about 0.5qt over-filled. That's ok for now.

4) Chock the wheels and start the engine. Shift through the gears at idle while holding the brake pedal and return to neutral. Monitor ATF temperature on the DIC. When the ATF reaches about 40C/104F slide under the truck with the engine still idling. Pull the ATF drain and let fluid drain down to the top of the stand pipe. When flow slows to a trickle you are there. Install the plug. Shut off the engine.

5) Now you can change your engine oil.

6) Go forth and enjoy your truck!
dude thanks a million for the in-depth write up there great stuff and will do! I’ll slow down next time and pay attention. Flthanks for the advise andhelp
 

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I mentioned chocking the wheels. Also make sure the park brake is firmly set.
I get nervous sliding under running vehicles - probably because that usually means you've been run over.

...Also probably better to have the trans in Park rather than neutral while under the vehicle. Makes no difference to the fluid check and locks the driveline. Instruction post has been edited per above.
 

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12 qts of oil in the engine is not going to help. I know, don’t be a dick. I’ve done similar stuff before like forgetting to put the drain plug back into the oil pan on a ‘66 Mustang. In the parking lot. On a military base. A six qt drain pan definitely does not hold 10 qts. 4+ ends up on/in the blacktop.

I’ve had similar questions while working on Harleys. “I only got about 1qt out of my oil pan.” Nope. That’s your transmission or the crankcase.

Great learning experience because this will never happen to the OP again. Guaranteed.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I mentioned chocking the wheels. Also make sure the park brake is firmly set.
I get nervous sliding under running vehicles - probably because that usually means you've been run over.

...Also probably better to have the trans in Park rather than neutral while under the vehicle. Makes no difference to the fluid check and locks the driveline. Instruction post has been edited per above.
388639

Worked like a charm sir thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #13
12 qts of oil in the engine is not going to help. I know, don’t be a dick. I’ve done similar stuff before like forgetting to put the drain plug back into the oil pan on a ‘66 Mustang. In the parking lot. On a military base. A six qt drain pan definitely does not hold 10 qts. 4+ ends up on/in the blacktop.

I’ve had similar questions while working on Harleys. “I only got about 1qt out of my oil pan.” Nope. That’s your transmission or the crankcase.

Great learning experience because this will never happen to the OP again. Guaranteed.
you are correct! Lol everything fixed now though my baby max is purring again.
 

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So far I've changed the oil in my truck (2.8) three times and I can honestly say that this is the worst oil filter housing configuration, I've ever had to deal with in any of my personal vehicles.

On every occasion, I've had to destroy the filter and use a set of long pliers to get the bottom plastic portion of the filter out of the housing. (OEM filter) Its made an easy DYI job into a pain in the butt. So many things to worry about when this happens, such as a small piece of the filter remaining in the housing and finding its way into a oil passage and causing an oil starvation issue in some critical part of the engine.

It sucks!!!
 

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Don't feel bad...we've all been there. I was swapping oil in my snowblower & forgot to re-install drain plug. Noticed while filling oil, waterfall of shiny fluid rolling down the driveway...>.<

Glad you got her serviced (motor + tranny) & back on road.
 

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I changed my own oil for 30 years without incident. A couple of years ago changed oil and did not notice the old oil filter gasket stayed on the car. Put a coat of oil on new filter gasket like always and spun on new filter. Added oil, then backed out of garage and saw a huge oil slick following me from garage.
 

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So far I've changed the oil in my truck (2.8) three times and I can honestly say that this is the worst oil filter housing configuration, I've ever had to deal with in any of my personal vehicles.

On every occasion, I've had to destroy the filter and use a set of long pliers to get the bottom plastic portion of the filter out of the housing. (OEM filter) Its made an easy DYI job into a pain in the butt. So many things to worry about when this happens, such as a small piece of the filter remaining in the housing and finding its way into a oil passage and causing an oil starvation issue in some critical part of the engine.

It sucks!!!
I’ve never had that happen over the 48k miles and all the oil changes that I’ve done. It sounds like you may not be snapping the oil filter into the cap before screwing the cap on. You’re not just inserting the filter into the housing and then screwing the cap on, are you?

For this to happen both times tells me it’s user error.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Lmao we've all done stupid **** with a new vehicle you love and you learn fortunately this site is full of good people and most offer good advice from personal experience.
 

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I get nervous sliding under running vehicles - probably because that usually means you've been run over.
Been there, done that and spent a week that I have no recollection of, in a local hospital.
 
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