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Last week I bought a 2005 colorado with 174000 miles on it. I check the oil the day I got it and the level was fine and I could tell the oil was changed not to long ago still look new. Today I took the oil cap off and there was thick milky looking crap. I kinda of freaked cause I never saw it before in my life. But I have been reading that this can happen with a car or truck that had sat unused for periods if time is this true? There are no signs of a head gasket blown no white smoke and antifreeze levels are good and no overheating. But I know that doesn't mean anything my main question is how to fix and what to look for if it is a major problem?
 

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Most common reason (in my opinion) for moisture in the oil is lack of running the engine long enough for it to sustain normal operating temperatures.

If the engine never burns off the condensate in the oil you'll see the milky substance.

Another cause of milky oil, especially in a PCV vent system is blowby.
 

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Mine is the same way. I even get some milky sluch on my dipstick. As what 08 said I would just have to say our engine likes to do that without an actual PCV valve.

If the oil level becomes higher or the coolant level becomes lower, then I would be concerned. Head gaskets are not common items.
 

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Jut, that's normal for my '05. I drive 17 miles each way to and from work and I get the milky residue in my oil fill cap as well. It'll normally disappear for me when the ambient temps come up a little from cold weather. But do insure your t-stat is working properly.
 
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