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Not sure where you got a figure of $136 for GM to print it in the owners manual?

Also, I guess I have to stand corrected. l I couldn't find anything about installing an airdam on the ZR2. Oh wait.........
Huh, a completely different bumper on a truck with a lower towing capacity, you don't suppose they, nah, well maybe designed the bumper with different airflow properties than the stock truck do ya? You weren't seriously using the ZR2 as a basis for comparison were you?

Here, I’ll put this to rest. I have 100K on my 16 Colorado and have had the air dam off since Day 1. I get 22 highway with a 1” inch lift and KO2s.
The air dam is hideous and useless. Remove it.
Just think, you could have had a 23 mpg average if you left it on or 24 mpg if you chose a better tire... I do think it is not very good looking but it is far from useless.

On the Silverado at straight highway speeds of 75 mph over 25 miles back to back that slightly smaller airdam (compared to the canyon/colorado) is good for just over 1mpg versus removing it. It does help with mpg first and foremost; if there wasn't a scenario in testing the engineers came across where it caused excessive heating of the engine they wouldn't have put it in the owners manual. So obviously some sort of testing they did they found the engine heating up with it off versus on, most likely in a scenario none of use will come across. It is comical people even debate this or think they know more than the people who designed and tested the truck in situations far worse than anyone here has put it through... Those who say it has no impact just aren't noticing the 0.2 mpg difference over all their driving in city that offsets it or aren't reading and tracking their engine temps to the degree to notice that couple extra degrees they may be running at with it off versus with it on.


Tyler
 

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Mine was removed at 4,500 miles, I currently have 70,000 miles. It has never had any cooling issues. Do with that information what you will.
 

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Most modern autos have a long life anti-freeze/coolant that will last anywhere from 60–75K to over 100K before they need to be flushed and refilled. If your car doesn’t have a long life coolant then you need to flush and fill the system every couple of years. What happens when you don’t is that sludge will built up in the cooling passages of the engine and, more importantly, it builds up in the small passages of the radiator. Once enough of this crud has formed in the radiator tubes the radiator is unable to effectively shed the heat load of the hot coolant and your car overheats. If you never check the coolant level in the expansion or overflow tank in the engine bay then you may have a very low coolant level. Some long life coolants, especially GM DexCool (it’s a kind of pinkish salmon colored liquid) don’t take kindly to a lot of air entering the cooling system and will turn to sludge. If all of this sounds Greek or is news to you then I’d strongly suggest you bring your car into a good, independent shop …one with a good reputation for doing good work and standing behind it. Have them check out your cooling system. jiofi.local.html Login – Manage & Change your JioFi Wifi Password For PC - Download Best Apps & Softwares for PC
 

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‘17 Colorado 4WD WT CCSB
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I had mine removed by the dealership the day I bought it while I was inside signing all the purchase paperwork. No one warned me about possible overheating. I was aware of the fuel mileage impact.

Now 3.5 years and 25,000 miles later, I've never had any issues with cooling. I live in North Carolina and have driven it a lot when temps are in the high 90's, even a few times in the low triple digits.

Since I don't have a before and after for mileage comparisons, all I can say is the mileage is routinely 28-29 for a full tank of driving.

Disclaimer: Your mileage (and engine temperature) may vary. :giggle:
 

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Hello everyone,

I've spent a good amount of money on aftermarket stuff at my dealership so they told me they'd take off the air dam for free next time I was in getting stuff done.

Well, I'm here, however the mechanic just warned me that the air dam isn't only for MPGs. He says it creates a low pressure area under the truck which helps cool it, especially when towing.uc browser shareit appvn


He said he's never seen any issues with it but to watch my temperature gauges.

Anyone heard of this?? I'm still getting it taken off but I wondered if anyone here who had gotten the dam removed had any experiences w/ this.

Thank you!
He just doesn't want to go through the trouble. I've had mine off for over a year. Never any issues. That being said, I drive mostly all highway and have noticed a 1 mpg difference. With it on I can achieve 21 with it off I'm at 20
 

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2021 GMC Canyon AT4
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I just finished some mpg testing on my 21 Canyon AT4 with and without the air dam. On my 50 mile drive to work which is all interstate and highway driving, 60-80 mph, I got 20.4 with the air dam and 20.3 without it. I didn’t notice any change in how stable it felt at speed either. The air dam doesn’t seem to be doing much.
 

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The air dam doesn’t seem to be doing much.
Well, except for being ugly. Also, without it, you don't have to jack the truck up to change your oil.......well, unless you are a little on the overly round size in which case you might have to. :p :ROFLMAO: :p
 

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Well this is a response to show pic with leveling kit and if you still remove air dam and does it look complete. It looks good to me. Also get to post another pic of the truck. :p

I have leveling kit, bigger tires, no air dam, not notice any overheating in the 100+ south Texas heat. Also have the OEM front and middle skid plates. If the air dam removal can cause air flow problems, then can adding the OEM front and mid skid plates have an effect also?

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I just finished some mpg testing on my 21 Canyon AT4 with and without the air dam. On my 50 mile drive to work which is all interstate and highway driving, 60-80 mph, I got 20.4 with the air dam and 20.3 without it. I didn’t notice any change in how stable it felt at speed either. The air dam doesn’t seem to be doing much.
I did the same thing with my Silverado except it was back to back with in an hour at the same speeds with cruise control and on the same route (just started and stopped at the same highway signs), mine was just over 1mpg (like 1.2 or something) with it on versus off. Granted the Silverado air dam is a little smaller, I ended up trimming mine as I don't like the incomplete look with them off and seeing the control arms and other stuff all exposed and in the air. Plus I was able to save a little mpg as opposed to it being completely off. They certainly work, what each person sees varies. I remember an engineer commenting they saved about 1mpg on the highway which was able to round up their combined average with other aerodynamic design changes.

Tyler
 

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You guys doing these 'tests' for a day or a week are not seeing anything realistic. A slight difference in air temperature can affect a daily MPG difference. Wind can affect it. Did you slow down sooner at one stop sign versus another one.

As has been posted MANY times on the forums already, there is one guy who did an ENTIRE YEAR with it on, and then another year with it off.....and his global MPG difference (if I remember correctly) was .1 MPG. (he has 2 youtube videos about it but Im too lazy to look it up and repost it herte for the hundredth time)

While neither that guy or you guys doing these tests are not doing it under controlled environments, at the end of the day does it really matter? I mean geez.....we are buying TRUCKS. If you want better gas mileage, buy a Prius.

Leave it on or take it off, as long as it makes you sleep better at night is all that matters. :D
 

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You guys doing these 'tests' for a day or a week are not seeing anything realistic. A slight difference in air temperature can affect a daily MPG difference. Wind can affect it. Did you slow down sooner at one stop sign versus another one.

As has been posted MANY times on the forums already, there is one guy who did an ENTIRE YEAR with it on, and then another year with it off.....and his global MPG difference (if I remember correctly) was .1 MPG. (he has 2 youtube videos about it but Im too lazy to look it up and repost it herte for the hundredth time)

While neither that guy or you guys doing these tests are not doing it under controlled environments, at the end of the day does it really matter? I mean geez.....we are buying TRUCKS. If you want better gas mileage, buy a Prius.

Leave it on or take it off, as long as it makes you sleep better at night is all that matters. :D
:ROFLMAO: This is why people need to do some research because there are many people that will spout false information that mislead others. Reading your post one would think the actual direct impact of that air dam is only 0.1 mpg when actual parameters it is designed for is much higher. I just follow the basic testing premises of any scientific test (test back to back in the same or as close to the same parameters that were tested in the previous test) and what the actual design and testing engineers have seen in their years and millions of miles of testing and wind tunnels and go with that. Those people are seeing around 1 mpg+ on the highway and a couple degrees in temperature won't swing the test 1 mpg either. If that were the case they would get 35 mpg in the summer and it is 95 degrees out then 5 mpg when the temp is below 20, it just doesn't work like that.

Granted if you drive mostly city you won't see much of a change overall, lets do some math to clear this up... If the net change is 1mpg at highway speeds (60+) from those same experts and similar testing scenarios; stop and go city there won't be a measurable impact, then if you drive 80/20 City/Hwy you are only going to have a 0.2 mpg difference overall roughly. Now if you spent 30k miles with it on then removed it, your lifetime average is going to take a long time to change to that new variance, especially if you are a mostly city driver. There are many factors that play in to it as well such as the winter was much colder or hotter during that time, you took more long road trips or added a trailer, maybe you got lazy on maintenance and your tires were 5 pounds lower than the previous year, etc. If you took it off the day you get home, no you aren't going to see any difference because you have nothing to compare it to other than a hypothetical I am in the ball park of what others are getting mpg wise with it on from what I can tell.

The people asking about them are concerned and they need to know the impact it has and when, not what some guy who only is concerned about looks an didn't think they notice much difference says when he took his off. Maybe they use the truck mainly for road trips, well it can save hundreds of dollars over the life of a vehicle. Who isn't game to save some money if they aren't concerned with how they think others perceive their trucks image with or without an air dam? Maybe they are retired and on social security and the truck is large expense, that money saved can help...

BTW, a year on and year off has basically zero weight for an actual test to the impact of the air dam as there are millions of factors that change in the time frame. Weather, traffic conditions, any trailer towing or hauling and even moods can easily sway or negate the test. That is why scientist make sure when comparing test results it is over the same parameters, not something with significantly different and variable test environments. So no, it isn't a 0.1mpg difference as that is an expense GM and even Mary would have said that isn't enough to spend millions of additional cost on testing and development to add to the truck and its cost. Why do you think makers are developing powered air dams that lower and extend automatically or the high fuel economy versions have a much lager air dam and are rated another 1 mpg over the regular versions? Think that cost is worth 0.1 mpg? It all adds up but there are cost benefit analysis's done and I can't see something like that making the cut if the actual mpg impact was that low.

To clarify how I did my test. It was between 11 and midnight on a week night, change in temp was around 2 or 3 degrees. I reset my mpg once up to speed and at a particular sign. I ran a loop of around 40 miles with it set between 60-70mph (it was changed at each speed limit sign in the same manner) and it was a 6-10 lane highway so traffic didn't have an impact on either run. Prior to exiting I noted the avg mpg of the run. It was done with in about 45 minutes of each other (the time it took to remove the air dam). Can't get much closer than that without having a specific test environment. The DIC showed 1.2mpg difference on my Silverado with a smaller air dam and noted it did go in to 4 cylinder mode less often.

This guy noticed 2 mpg on versus off over two days... That could be much closer weather wise and testing environment/parameters.


This is just an excellent visual on how parts of cars clean up air in different areas and smooth turbulence.


Tyler
 

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Well this is a response to show pic with leveling kit and if you still remove air dam and does it look complete. It looks good to me. Also get to post another pic of the truck. :p

I have leveling kit, bigger tires, no air dam, not notice any overheating in the 100+ south Texas heat. Also have the OEM front and middle skid plates. If the air dam removal can cause air flow problems, then can adding the OEM front and mid skid plates have an effect also?
Nope, it isn't mentioned in the manual and they don't have any impact on the radiator air flow like air dams usually can. They are GM parts they have tested so if anything was found it would have been noted.

Tyler
 

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Well maybe GM will release a wind tunnel air flow test with/without the air dam that shows what we are actually talking about. (That is supposed to be funny :)).

I understand the potential of over heating in the scenario "driving with a full load in tow in The Mojave Desert in 120+ degrees".

But I suspect that 99.9% of us will never encounter a scenario that the air dam removal in itself would cause permanent damage to the engine. If you do and over heating happens, stop and cool off. Just my opinion.

Seems like "dead horse" conversation. I removed it for better ground clearance and I think it looks better gone. As far as mpg, don't care. I can afford the slight difference.
 
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Lets not forget that one of the people that designed the truck, a GM engineer, when showing off the truck, specifically stated that due to the low ground clearance, they recommend you take the air dam off. Thus, there is no way in hell that the airdam could seriously impact the temp in any way, shape or form.

Im gonna have to go looking for that video.

Edit - 2:11
 

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Odd thing is mine (GMC Canyon) has a forward facing "scoop" not far behind the air dam. No idea how the heck that works but aero is a complicated thing. I would not give your mechanic a hard time about this, I am sure he was told that it improves the cooling flow by creating a low pressure area by someone he trusts, so that has become his belief. Unless you get some really sophisticatedf instrumentation going to accurately measure all the potentially affected parameters you will never know for sure. I know a couple of guys who swear they actually get better MPG with tailgate down even though that has been disproven by testing, I don't argue with them, no point.
 

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Lets not forget that one of the people that designed the truck, a GM engineer, when showing off the truck, specifically stated that due to the low ground clearance, they recommend you take the air dam off. Thus, there is no way in hell that the airdam could seriously impact the temp in any way, shape or form.

Im gonna have to go looking for that video.

Edit - 2:11
Not to mention that on the GMC website they show the AT4 with the air dam removed. I got a pamphlet in the mail for my AT4, and in all the pictures in it the dam is removed also.

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Odd thing is mine (GMC Canyon) has a forward facing "scoop" not far behind the air dam. No idea how the heck that works but aero is a complicated thing. I would not give your mechanic a hard time about this, I am sure he was told that it improves the cooling flow by creating a low pressure area by someone he trusts, so that has become his belief. Unless you get some really sophisticatedf instrumentation going to accurately measure all the potentially affected parameters you will never know for sure. I know a couple of guys who swear they actually get better MPG with tailgate down even though that has been disproven by testing, I don't argue with them, no point.
I noticed it as well. No idea what the purpose of it is. It has 3 openings and just butts up against a "crossmember" which has a vertical plate attached to it. The plate that's attached to the crossmember doesn't go all the way across, it only spans the first 2 sections in the scoop. Those holes appear to head to the power steering pump, so maybe its to try and keep that cool? No idea, but I have pictures.

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Dealer took mine off, as a contingency for me taking delivery. Never had a problem. The bottom was all scuffed up with 0.1 miles on it from when they unloaded the truck from the carrier. It's absolutely ridiculous to have an airdam that low to the ground on a Z71.
 
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Well my 2019 Colorado goes in to my dealership Monday morning to get that ugly piece of s**t removed.
 

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2017 Canyon AT 4x4 2.8L CCLB Dark Slate Metallic
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Lets not forget that one of the people that designed the truck, a GM engineer, when showing off the truck, specifically stated that due to the low ground clearance, they recommend you take the air dam off. Thus, there is no way in hell that the airdam could seriously impact the temp in any way, shape or form.

Im gonna have to go looking for that video.

Edit - 2:11
"Thus" they put a Caution statement in the owner's manual for improper airflow to the engine.
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