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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone,

I've spent a good amount of money on aftermarket stuff at my dealership so they told me they'd take off the air dam for free next time I was in getting stuff done.

Well, I'm here, however the mechanic just warned me that the air dam isn't only for MPGs. He says it creates a low pressure area under the truck which helps cool it, especially when towing.uc browser shareit appvn


He said he's never seen any issues with it but to watch my temperature gauges.

Anyone heard of this?? I'm still getting it taken off but I wondered if anyone here who had gotten the dam removed had any experiences w/ this.

Thank you!
 

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No i actually took dam off myself about year ago or more no overheating issues at all although i haven’t towed anything yet


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The mechanic sounds like he may have a part time job writing disclaimers for prescription medicine. Yes, as he stated, under certain conditions it could cause problems. So if you are ever towing at maximum capacity through Death Valley in August and get caught in stop and go traffic, watch your temperature gauge.
 

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Anyone heard of this?? I'm still getting it taken off but I wondered if anyone here who had gotten the dam removed had any experiences w/ this.
Four years of towing - No air dam - No issues!
 

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Over two years without it and no overheating issues. And since I record all fuel ups and track mileage, I can tell you it doesn't help gas mileage either.
 

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I don’t see how it could cause over heating. If it really would wouldn’t the aftermarket bumper makers have to make one for theirs
 

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Hummmm......
My ZR2 has no dam air dam.....she runs cool as a cucumber.

Typical BS from a dealer......
Not all dealerships are out to get you.

There is a very specific range of operating conditions that the air dam would help with cooling. As stated above, if you're towing in Death Valley in August and get caught in stop and go traffic, watch your temp gauges.
 

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Not all dealerships are out to get you.

There is a very specific range of operating conditions that the air dam would help with cooling. As stated above, if you're towing in Death Valley in August and get caught in stop and go traffic, watch your temp gauges.
Never said they all were.......
But the vast majority speak out their @$$ and have very little knowledge on the vehicles they sell.

Those same extreme conditions would warrant watching your temp gauge regardless of air dam or not.....
 

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Hummmm......
My ZR2 has no dam air dam.....she runs cool as a cucumber.

Typical BS from a dealer......

Was it not specifically stated by one of the engineers on the ZR2 project that one reason for the significant decrease in towing capacity was the change to the front fascia, which includes completely eliminating the low pressure area under the truck? And that this affects the ability to cool critical components properly?

As stated already a few times, yeah it'd take the "right" conditions for the lack of air dam to be the deciding factor in overheating, but it's not like he was spewing BS.

OP (and everyone else) who removed their air dam will likely be fine in spite of doing that, but I'm not sure the ZR2 is the example to use when trying to say the air dam cooling factor is complete BS.
 

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Was it not specifically stated by one of the engineers on the ZR2 project that one reason for the significant decrease in towing capacity was the change to the front fascia, which includes completely eliminating the low pressure area under the truck? And that this affects the ability to cool critical components properly?

As stated already a few times, yeah it'd take the "right" conditions for the lack of air dam to be the deciding factor in overheating, but it's not like he was spewing BS.

OP (and everyone else) who removed their air dam will likely be fine in spite of doing that, but I'm not sure the ZR2 is the example to use when trying to say the air dam cooling factor is complete BS.
Depends on who you believe I guess......
I see nothing mentioned about airflow in the GM Authority article below.

For towers, it may have come as a shock when Chevrolet announced the 2017 Colorado ZR2 would be capable of pulling 2,000 pounds less. But, the 5,000-pound tow rating comes at the expense of the off-road upgrades. You can’t always have your cake and eat it, too.

We asked Chevrolet why 2,000 pounds had to be cut back from the 2017 Colorado ZR2’s towing rating, and the answer simply lies in the revised chassis design.

The 2017 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 features a two-inch higher lift, three and a half inch higher track, and both cause towing ratings to slip. The other portions of the 5,000-pound towing puzzle are the redesigned spring and damper rates. While the regular Colorado can handle the extra weight in the rear, the Colorado ZR2 focuses more on its rock crawling capabilities rather than what’s on its tow hook at the rear.

And, let’s be honest, who’s going to be towing 5,000 pounds while off-roading this beast? We’d rather focus on getting the Colorado ZR2 muddy without the burden of towing.



Read more: Why The 2017 Colorado ZR2 Only Tows 5,000 Lbs | GM Authority
Source:
http://gmauthority.com/blog/2016/11...colorado-zr2s-tow-rating-fell-by-2000-pounds/
 

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Sounds like you need a new mechanic! lol :D
 

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Every manufacturer, from Campbell's soup to Chevy, will try and squeeze as much cost out of their product while attempting to deliver the highest quality they can. It is a painstaking balancing act. Sometimes you save costs and deliver lower quality, sometimes you increase costs and deliver higher quality, and sometimes everything goes to crap...

Engineering and Design would have had to make a case for why the air dam is necessary in order for it to be installed on every Colorado (except the ZR2). Its function is to change the aerodynamics of the vehicle, which plays a role in both fuel mileage and cooling. Will your truck blow up if you remove it? Very unlikely.
Does the Tech at the dealership have to warn you? Absolutely, he does. It's a "Cover your ass" statement. I would tell you the same thing if I were in his shoes.
Since I'm not in his shoes, I will tell you that I've had mine removed for several years without trouble. I'm about to tow 750 miles tomorrow, and I have no concerns about overheating.
 

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Depends on who you believe I guess......
I see nothing mentioned about airflow in the GM Authority article below.

Source:
Why The 2017 Colorado ZR2 Only Tows 5,000 Lbs | GM Authority
Yeah I've seen that, I'm pretty sure Drax linked it last time the ZR2 towing capacity difference subject came up. I'm referencing something I saw in an interview, I think it was on TFL Truck's youtube channel. I'll try to dig it up when I get the chance. Can't do it at work right now.

I'd be inclined to believe the chassis/suspension changes were far more responsible for the decrease, but I also trust an engineer on the project when they talk about the effects of removing that low pressure area considering how incredibly important deltas are in increasing the efficiency in many modern designs, both in terms of cooling and ingestion.
 

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One of the first things I did was remove and throw my airdam in the trash.
ZERO temp issues towing to the so cal dessert (in winter 60 to 90 F) and to the Colorado river (in the summer 70 to 110 F).
Not enough of a MPG change to even notice.
Simply laugh at the mechanic and tell him to do his job or remove the thing yourself.
 

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Lots of misinformation in here. First the mechanic is correct, it can under certain conditions cause overheating issues. Just because the 10 people in here say they haven't had a problem doesn't mean it isn't a possibility or wasn't found in testing. If it wasn't an issue, why is it called out in the manual?

"To gain more ground clearance if
needed, it may be necessary to
remove the front fascia lower air
dam. However, driving without the
air dam reduces fuel economy.

Caution
Operating the vehicle for
extended periods without the front
fascia lower air dam installed can
cause improper airflow to the
engine. Reattach the front fascia
air dam after off-road driving."

As far as it doesn't impact MPG, that just is flat out incorrect. Again, just because a few people say they saw no impact doesn't make it true (it probably wasn't a big enough change to where they actually noticed, say going from 17.1 to 17.3). It is a solid 1+ mpg on the highway. Shoot, I did a before and after removal on my Silverado with a smaller valance and it lost 1.3 mpg over a 17 mile loop back to back with in an hour time frame at 70 mph with cruise set. If you do more city driving the overall average impact will be less, if you spend a ton of time on the highway it will be more. Either way they wouldn't put it on if it didn't help. Nor would they make a disclaimer if they didn't find some scenario where the truck got hot. Like someone said above probably towing a flat front trailer slowly up a grade in 110 degree heat with a full load on the hitch which probably no one here has done (towing a boat or open car trailer is completely different).

Your mechanic is correct, it is up to you to decide if you want to or not. Chances are you will be fine, but they have to warn you. The whole low pressure area was big on the f-body cars if I remember correctly (it may have been another 90's GM model) where with out the chin spoiler under the car it would tend to over heat for the exact reason the low pressure area wasn't there to allow air to move more freely. As soon as they put it back on poof, normal operating temps. Granted our trucks are a little different but that is part of the design...

Lot's of information on this out there, just have to search.

Tyler
 

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I removed my airdam at 5,000 miles. Right after I did I started overheating. Put it back on and it's cool now.






JK.....

p.s.
never go to a salesman for technical advise. Especially the ones on TV that are also engineers, they can be full of it. It just seems they tell you what they want you to hear. Like they are salesman first, then an engineer....lol I don't know about the ZR2 story, it could be right on.

There is no doubt in my mind that thing helps with cooling, but there is also no doubt in my mind that our cooling systems are above the threshold of overheating without it(when everything is new, full and clean). There are other things to cool also, AC condensers, trans coolers, even electric power steering now. But yes, I would not sweat it at all.

interesting fact on the subject, I have personally seen the airdam help cool 1990 something police Caprices at high speed. Tested it myself. Good thing I got payed by the hour, right?! ;)
 
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