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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

My appologies if this has been discussed. I did a few searches but didnt find anything addressing my question.

I am starting to do some offroading...beginner trails for fairly stock vehicles, but they have rocks, stumps, etc. I want to replace the OEM wranglers with 265/70/17 rubber. I already have a leveling kit installed.

Does the load rating give the tire any added benefits against punctures or sidewall cuts when on the trail?

I can find BFG KO2s in C rated, Duratracs in SL and C rated, and Falken's in SL and E ratings.

I'm leaning towards either the Duratracs or Falkens in SL rating to save weight. Is there any reason I should consider a C or E rated tire??

Thank you, George
 

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I am no expert on tires, but load ratings are in regard to how much weight a tire can support. It has no direct correlation to "puncture resistance" other than the fact that the heavier tire with heavier wall may just be harder to puncture.

I think a lot of people look toward tires with kevlar belts, etc. to get the puncture resistance, but there are far greater experts than I in this area on these forums who can help you out.
 
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I am no expert on tires, but load ratings are in regard to how much weight a tire can support. It has no direct correlation to "puncture resistance" other than the fact that the heavier tire with heavier wall may just be harder to puncture.

I think a lot of people look toward tires with kevlar belts, etc. to get the puncture resistance, but there are far greater experts than I in this area on these forums who can help you out.
^^^This


People confuse todays load rating with sidewall ply because of the "cross over" value. That is, when you look up a load rating on todays tires you can cross reference that to an old bias ply tire rating. Bias ply sidewall load rating WAS directly related to the number of plies and thus puncture resistance.
However todays steel belted radial tires often only get 2 plies in the sidewall and the heaviest load ranges still generally only get 3 plies in the sidewall.

You will often see people run load range E tires today because it relates to an old bias ply load rating of 10 plies and think they have 10 ply sidewalls. But since they are radials they still usually only have 3 plies.
 

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With off road tires you want to look at what they are intended for.


Most tires are made for mud or dirt and many today for rock crawling. This calls for different compounds and designs to do each. Then you have all terrain that are a compromise of each.


They all will go flat but rock crawling generally has the most flats so they generally have stronger constructed side walls.


Look at the construction of the tire and not the load ratings as they can be misleading. Match the design to your priority need.
 

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Generally speaking, the greater the load rating the thicker the tire, with more plies. So you could imply that it would be more puncture resistant,simply because it is thicker. You won't find any actual test of that theory, though.

Many tires - like the stock Z71 tires - advertise that they contain Kevlar and are therefore tougher and more resistant to puncture. But if you read the tire specs, what you find is that the kevlar is only on the side wall, and not on the treads. That's nice when your rock crawling and pretty much useless everywhere else.

Also, look at tread depth. Some tires have more tread depth than others. The thicker the tread, the more resistant the tire is going be to puncture - probably.

So for a beginner trail, with stumps and small rocks, I would look for a thicker tread for more rubber, a higher load rating for more steel plies, and kevlar sidewalls.
 

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You want to look for a tire that has 'sidewall' protection (kevlar, multiple plys).
Most Mud Terrain tires will have that.

Granted - the stiffer and more protection there is, the stiffer and less comfortable ride you'll have for daily use.

Even if you have all the sidewall protection in the world, you could still puncture a tire and/or it'll come off the bead. Try not to over-think it. Buy yourself a decent All-Terrain tire or street friendly M/T, air down, and get a spare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You want to look for a tire that has 'sidewall' protection (kevlar, multiple plys).
Most Mud Terrain tires will have that.

Granted - the stiffer and more protection there is, the stiffer and less comfortable ride you'll have for daily use.

Even if you have all the sidewall protection in the world, you could still puncture a tire and/or it'll come off the bead. Try not to over-think it. Buy yourself a decent All-Terrain tire or street friendly M/T, air down, and get a spare.

Thanks everyone. Speaking of spare tires.......i assume I should buy 5 tires in 265/70/17 so i have the same diameter spare? Willl that tires fit in the stock spare location under the bed? I put the spare in the bed while offroad but it goes back under for daily use.

George
 

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I have my full size spare secured in the bed, I put together a tire repair kit. Most well air down tires when off road so a air compressor is a good idea. There are good 12V and even 24V/40V lipo battery powered units that are fairly inexpensiveness. I think tire repair and inflation is as important as recovery gear.
 

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Thanks everyone. Speaking of spare tires.......i assume I should buy 5 tires in 265/70/17 so i have the same diameter spare? Willl that tires fit in the stock spare location under the bed? I put the spare in the bed while offroad but it goes back under for daily use.

George
Ideally yes. In reality I didnt :frown2: Reason being is that cash was tight when I was buying and didnt want to spend the extra $$. My spare is off by about an inch, smaller.

Where problems could come into play using a different size spare is if you have a locking axle, which for most of us thats only on the rear axle. Having different sized tires could cause the locker to engage or stay engaged, creating extra stress. IMO if I had to use it, it's not a huge deal offroad as there is plenty of slippage to release that stress. On road it could be used for a short time, going as straight as possible. Or just put it on the front. Obviously being different sizes it could drive weird and could be unsafe in stability but for emergency use at low speeds to get you "home" it should fine.

Eventually, like when I get a rear swing out, I'll get a matching spare.
 

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Thanks everyone. Speaking of spare tires.......i assume I should buy 5 tires in 265/70/17 so i have the same diameter spare? Willl that tires fit in the stock spare location under the bed? I put the spare in the bed while offroad but it goes back under for daily use.

George
To keep things easier - get a fullsize spare. If you're short on cash, call your local tire retailer/garage and ask if they have USED tires in the size you need. Doesn't have to match (brand,manufacturer) - just needs to get you back home.
You could even buy the cheapest / used off-road wheel to install it on.

A tire repair kit (plug kit) is a good idea. Although, you can't repair a slashed sidewall and don't buy or use that cheesy green slimy crap. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks All!!


I am investing in a VIAIR portable compressor, an ARB air down kit, and a tire repair kit. I will look for a cheap tire in the same size as my 4 on the ground to act as my spare


Regards


George
 

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George; as with all things, it depends.

In the NE, you'll rarely find recently new (few million year old) sharp volcanic rock, so you have a lot less to worry about. We like to go to Wyoming, there many of the "roads" are paved with sharp volcanic rock - the stuff goes right through the tread of P rated tires.
 

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George; as with all things, it depends.

In the NE, you'll rarely find recently new (few million year old) sharp volcanic rock, so you have a lot less to worry about. We like to go to Wyoming, there many of the "roads" are paved with sharp volcanic rock - the stuff goes right through the tread of P rated tires.

Wow....that stuff looks gnarly. I definitely don't have that in the NE. We are mostly granite here. Im actually more concerned about that rogue tree stump!
 

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I made the mistake of buying tires and not considering the spare. I was fortunate enough to not have any issues with the tires- the place I have had do my suspension installs just did a trade for my unused spare for the larger size. Perhaps other shops would be able to do something like that for you
 
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