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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know our 2nd gen trucks are offered with a G80 autolocking rear differential (or in the case of the ZR2 an Eaton E-locker), and for off-road stuff, a locker is preferred.

That said, is there an old fashion clutch type LSD that will fit in the rear axle differential housing of the 2nd gen twins?
 

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I asked a company in Washington State which does this work whether there was a TrueTrac available for the 2nd gen twins. They said there was not and they did not know of any plans for one. Too bad. That's the one I want. I have 2WD.
 

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Are you wanting a more automatic type operation than the switched locker the ZR2 has?

I don't know why they included the switch, the mechanical G80 works excellently without the electronics added. For stock or mildly modified rigs, the mechanical 120RPM difference between sides is a decent trigger. I'd prefer a little less wheelspin (60RPM) before engagement, but it definitely beats open or spooled diffs.
 

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I am not aware of a limited slip for this.

The ZR2 switches as there is just much more control. Also on the front you really want more control.

The G80 works fine.

They keep the RPM up as many people with poor car control would be sideways pulling away from a light in the snow.
 

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The M80 is a limited slip most of the time, that locks up when needed. It's the best of both worlds. Unless you're planning on some serious off road driving, then I wouldn't change anything. If you are planning for some serious stuff, I'd plan on replacing the entire axle to something a lot stronger.


MLocker (G80) Operation
During normal driving conditions, the MLocker (G80) functions as a light-bias limited slip differential. When a low-traction situation occurs that causes a wheel speed difference greater than 100 RPM, a flyweight mechanism opens to engage a latching bracket. The stopped flyweight triggers a self-energizing clutch system, forcing a cam plate to ramp against a side gear. Cam plate ramping will continue to increase until both axles turn at the same speed (full lock), which prevents further wheel slip. When the need for improved traction is gone - unlocking occurs automatically and the differential resumes normal operation.

Eaton MLocker (G80) mechanical locking differential, automatic locking differential
 

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I, and I'm pretty sure nfmisso are aware of how the G80 works. But the Z71/LT twins and the ZR2 G80s are functionally different, the ZR2 G80 manually engaged using an electromagnet actuated by a switch, and the other G80 automatically engaged, using a clutch plate and ramp system actuated by wheelspin. I'm guessing the purpose of this thread is to see if the automatic capability could be recouped with an LSD.
 

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The Z71 G80 IS a Limited Slip Differential, using a clutch pack. It only becomes a locker with the difference in wheel spin. IMO, for most people - especially if you live in snow country - this is exactly what you want. There are a few situations where you might want a true locker, like the old Detroit Locker from the muscle car days. But to go to a straight clutch pack LSD would be a step down in operation.

As I understand it, the ZR2 differentials - both front and rear - are both normally open diffs that are completely locked electromagnetically. That is how the Eaton E-Locker has normally worked, and I don't think they changed anything when they installed it on the Colorado.

As I see it, this a comprimise. Off road, it's superb, about the best you can get; especially since it will stay locked at every speed.. But for other situations, like ice, snow, sandy, slippery roads, it's not as good as the G80.
 

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Came by here researching my next truck, but just my .02 - with my '06 that has the auto locking rear it's very sensitive as far as the truck very quickly coming around on me with the auto locking rear. I've never crashed it after 240K so certainly am able to control it just fine, but definitely is not a good kids car, also had a girl I let drive it once get us sideways on an on ramp (and of course she totally freaked out) when she punched it while turning on wet pavement and it went 90 degrees instantly. I've always seen the auto locker as a blessing when I decide to drive through 2 feet of snow or deep mud, and would prefer that to nothing any day, but it is a curse for being out on the road. Sorry to be a broken record if you read my previous post but I can bang donuts on wet pavement w/ my '06, even accidentally have had the rear end kick out on me into the next lane just getting going from a stop light, very touchy, also is slow to disengage and will hop for awhile at times.

The other thing I would state is with my blazers if you got a little sideways, which did not have an auto locking rear, hitting the gas would about straighten them out. When your rear is locked up it just doesn't work that way. Personally I think the best setup is a simple manual locker front & rear with nothing automatic - then on the road you leave it unlocked and easier to control, when you want max traction you lock 'em up (which is not exactly what you get in an ZR2 either but just saying incase you think the auto locking posi has no downside, my experience is it does, rather have a manual locker).

Jon
 

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I have never had any issues with my locker on ice. This includes both my 2WD Tahoe and my 2WD Canyon. If it causes you to lose control then what would you do without it?
 
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Came by here researching my next truck, but just my .02 - with my '06 that has the auto locking rear it's very sensitive as far as the truck very quickly coming around on me

Jon
I wonder if there's something wrong with yours. Mine has been very sure footed and stable in some of the absolute worst weather I'v seen in a long time. Even with the mediocre factory all terrain tires I'v been very impressed with how well this truck handles in all kinds of situations - both 4high and 4auto.

What you describe - and I believe every word you say, I don't doubt you for a minute - is the exact opposite of what I experience. If you look at the description of operation from Eaton, it shouldn't be anything like what you experience. You kinda describe an old Detroit Locker from the muscle car days. You might consider having a good diff shop look yours over.
 

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what bugs me about it is it locks kind of violently. Can't be good for the diff (or the rest of the drivetrain) I like that it is a positive lock but still, it just doesn't seem right for something to slam into gear like it does, so to speak.
 
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The designation "G80" is the order code, and not a part number. That has not changed over the years. However, part numbers and technology has - thankfully - changed with the times.


The current locking differential in new Colorado is the Eaton MLocker, and does contain a clutch pack.


"Utilizing a flyweight mechanism and self-energizing clutch system, "


Eaton MLocker (G80) mechanical locking differential, automatic locking differential


The new diff works like a Positraction most of the time, using a clutch pack. But when a wheel speed differential of 100 or 120 rpm occurs, it mechanically locks. The older differential was open until it locked, and did not use a clutch pack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The designation "G80" is the order code, and not a part number. That has not changed over the years. However, part numbers and technology has - thankfully - changed with the times.


The current locking differential in new Colorado is the Eaton MLocker, and does contain a clutch pack.


"Utilizing a flyweight mechanism and self-energizing clutch system, "


Eaton MLocker (G80) mechanical locking differential, automatic locking differential


The new diff works like a Positraction most of the time, using a clutch pack. But when a wheel speed differential of 100 or 120 rpm occurs, it mechanically locks. The older differential was open until it locked, and did not use a clutch pack.
This is very helpful.

My apologies to all; I am not looking to change my ZR2; I am interest in adding a more road oriented 2WD truck with a more highly biased clutch pack LSD. I think that I can modify the Eaton MLocker (G80) to function as I desire. I learned to drive in the Chicago area, and spent many years in Minnesota. I had a '70 AMX with close ratio 4 speed, 3.54 gears and a limited slip - drove it year round, never had snow tires, never got stuck either. Later in life, again in Minnesota, I had a 2004 Ranger 5 speed, 4 cylinder; I changed the rear end to 4.10 gears and a Ford Racing LSD. I am wanting to get that sort of feeling again - being able to hold and control a power slide, and having great slippery highway stability. The Ranger without the LSD terrified me - once it started sliding, no control; with the LSD it would slide sooner, but totally controllable.
 

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The designation "G80" is the order code, and not a part number. That has not changed over the years. However, part numbers and technology has - thankfully - changed with the times.


The current locking differential in new Colorado is the Eaton MLocker, and does contain a clutch pack.


"Utilizing a flyweight mechanism and self-energizing clutch system, "


Eaton MLocker (G80) mechanical locking differential, automatic locking differential


The new diff works like a Positraction most of the time, using a clutch pack. But when a wheel speed differential of 100 or 120 rpm occurs, it mechanically locks. The older differential was open until it locked, and did not use a clutch pack.
nope, don't think that is correct. It does have a couple clutch rings but the they are not engaged all the time like a posi. The thing is open until the difference in one wheel is 120 RPM then it locks in. Watch the video you posted a link to then let us know what you think.
 

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From the description:

MLocker (G80)

Eaton's MLocker® (G80) mechanical locking differential provides drivers best-in-class traction without the need for push-buttons, shift knobs or other intervention method. Utilizing a flyweight mechanism and self-energizing clutch system, the Eaton MLocker (G80) engages in low traction situations when a wheel speed difference of 100 RPM or greater (left-to-right) is detected. Automatic locking takes place within a fraction of a second, providing the driver with increased safety and confidence when traveling on wet or icy roads, gravel, mud and dirt. The mechanical locker is also compatible with existing anti-lock brake and vehicle stability systems, which simplifies platform integration for global OEMs.

MLocker (G80) Operation
During normal driving conditions, the MLocker (G80) functions as a light-bias limited slip differential. When a low-traction situation occurs that causes a wheel speed difference greater than 100 RPM, a flyweight mechanism opens to engage a latching bracket. The stopped flyweight triggers a self-energizing clutch system, forcing a cam plate to ramp against a side gear. Cam plate ramping will continue to increase until both axles turn at the same speed (full lock), which prevents further wheel slip. When the need for improved traction is gone - unlocking occurs automatically and the differential resumes normal operation.
 

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The sales sheet for the MLocker claims that it contains "carbon friction discs" and per Cary's quote above it operates as a light bias limited slip when unlocked. From the parts diagram I assume this means one disc per side as opposed to a wet clutch pack.

How lightly biased?
I raised one wheel, put the truck in neutral and put my torque wrench on a lug nut that was offset 90 degree from the torque wrench axis.
Depending on wheel position the axle would slowly creep with 10 to 15 ft-lb applied. That break away torque will increase somewhat with spider gear load but felt a lot like pinion bearing preload to me. I expect these really don't do much until they lock.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

This just in: I found an online article with a better exploded view (didn't think to save the link). It looks like the parts I was interpreting as thrust plates or the like in Eaton's simple exploded view are actually clutch packs. It also appears that there is one clutch pack dedicated to lockup in addition to a couple used as conventional LSD. There are no preload springs (light-bias) and as such breakaway torque at low/no axle load is low.
 

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The sales sheet for the MLocker claims that it contains "carbon friction discs" and per Cary's quote above it operates as a light bias limited slip when unlocked. From the parts diagram I assume this means one disc per side as opposed to a wet clutch pack.

How lightly biased?
I raised one wheel, put the truck in neutral and put my torque wrench on a lug nut that was offset 90 degree from the torque wrench axis.
Depending on wheel position the axle would slowly creep with 10 to 15 ft-lb applied. That break away torque will increase somewhat with spider gear load but felt a lot like pinion bearing preload to me. I expect these really don't do much until they lock.
My guess is that by incorporating a little bit of slip in the differential, you can't blow up the power train by trying to transfer all of that power to the wheels. Saves the transmission, drive shaft, and engine from serious shock loading when someone goes looking to max out the torque and horsepower of their truck.
 

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I have a 2017 CC Z71 4x4 V6 and often drive on steep snowy roads here in Utah.

A few questions.
1) Once the G80 has engaged (for example a snowy road) how long does it remained locked?
2) While engaged do both wheels have power split 50:50?
3) How does the trucks traction control work, does it help or hurt the G80 locking?
 

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nope, don't think that is correct. It does have a couple clutch rings but the they are not engaged all the time like a posi. The thing is open until the difference in one wheel is 120 RPM then it locks in. Watch the video you posted a link to then let us know what you think.
OK. Well, you can believe what the company says about their product. Or not. Your choice.


Like my dad always said, "You can lead a horse to water. But you can't pound feathers in to marble."
 
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