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2019 Z71 @roaminginthe.z71
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To me, low (either on the shifter or 4lo) generally means single digit speeds.
Just to clarify this - yes absolutely if you're in 4WD low keep to low speeds, but the "L" on the gear shift just means manual shifting. Doesn't matter if you're going 8mph or 80mph, but you have to shift it properly. Still, I'm sure there are safeguards so that you don't harm the engine even when in manual mode.
 

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How hasn't the truck been performing up to par in your opinion? My ZR2 did great last winter. We had lots of snow; it never missed a beat.
Maybe he left the air dam on and lowered the truck.... Seriously these things are great in winter, drove past so many stuck half tons when my area had 3+ feet of snow this past winter
 

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PSA for those unsure about L on the shifter. It stands for Limit and will limit the top gear that the transmission will use.

So for instance on dirt switchbacks I would leave the shifter in L3 and 4Lo if the road is rough and keep the speed under 25MPH (about 40Km/hr). The transmission will shift normally through 1st, 2nd, 3rd but will go no higher.

If it's just a dirt road leave it in D and Auto-4Hi and give'r
 

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Last month I drove up and down the auto toll road at Mt. Mansfield in Vermont. It's a four and a half mile dirt road with a few switchbacks that goes up about four thousand feet. Taking the advice I was given at the gate I had the shifter in L the whole time both up and down. I also had the 4WD switch set to 4H most of the way. About halfway down I changed it to 2H. Also around that time I started smelling fluid burning and saw a little bit of smoke coming from...somewhere. I wasn't riding the brakes. When I got back to the parking lot I sat and let it cool off for a while before shifting to D and taking off. I haven't used 4WD since. The truck's brand new. What did I do?

This reminds me of a time I drove a Hyundai Accent on I-70 through Colorado and going downhill I started to ride the brake because just coasting was making the transmission spin too fast and that thing started burning fluid....
Putting the trans in "L" puts the trans in low gear and keeps it there, unless you manually shift up or down. It sounds like you may have burned the first gear clutches, which is not covered by warranty because GM would consider it negligent action on your part. puts the trans in low gear and keeps it there, unless you manually shift up or down. It sounds like you may have burned the first gear clutches, which is not covered by warranty because GM would consider it negligent action on your part.
 

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Of course they did…that way people wouldn’t take the time to change the fluid because of the hassle of dropping The cover...Just like front End components and U Joints that we’re capable of being greased. Removing them was done because, according to “engineers” permanently greased and sealed components last longer than the ones you can service because people wouldn’t do it and cause failures. However, greaseable stuff can tolerateold greased better to a point and, honestly, who changes their own oil anymore? No reason a lubie can’t hit those zerks with the ole grease while the oil drains. Instead, they try to upswell you a new air cleaner to replace the one you put in last week…
On the damned S-trucks from memory most of the zerks were in no position to be accessed with a grease gun even with a flex hose - had to swap most of them out for 45 and 90 zerks. Only GM would put a straight grease fitting on a joint and have about 1/4" of access clearance...

Honestly don't mind the sealed bearings, at least on cars, never had one fail yet in<150k. From what I saw most lube shops would overgrease the joints until the grease started blowing out of the boots.
 
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2020 Z71 Midnight Edition w/ Urban Armor Equipment
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On the damned S-trucks from memory most of the zerks were in no position to be accessed with a grease gun even with a flex hose - had to swap most of them out for 45 and 90 zerks. Only GM would put a straight grease fitting on a joint and have about 1/4" of access clearance...

Honestly don't mind the sealed bearings, at least on cars, never had one fail yet in<150k. From what I saw most lube shops would overgrease the joints until the grease started blowing out of the boots.
Very good points. shops don’t get that most ball joints need a pump or maybe two and they’re set. GM also screwed up he zeros too. I guess it’s cheaper/quicker to just slap straight zeros on everything and send it. The 2500 I own actually makes the zeros pretty damn accessible, the lower control arms even have a depression in front of the ball joint zero so a gun can attacheasily. On,y the idler arm was a pain but the new one I installed has a two foot hose to mount it in a better accessed area.
 

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Putting the trans in "L" puts the trans in low gear and keeps it there, unless you manually shift up or down. It sounds like you may have burned the first gear clutches, which is not covered by warranty because GM would consider it negligent action on your part. puts the trans in low gear and keeps it there, unless you manually shift up or down. It sounds like you may have burned the first gear clutches, which is not covered by warranty because GM would consider it negligent action on your part.
I have never understood how "L" worked until recently someone explained it on this forum.
Initially, I assumed "L" was to manually shift the gears, up and down but this is not the case. Just like OP said "L" is for limit and does exactly what the OP said. In town I drive my truck in "L" and have it set at 5th gear, if i i know I'm gonna hit the high way I put it to 6 or 7. My truck drives better in "L".
 

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'21 Canyon AT4, CCSB, leather, Bose, etc.
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Last weekend, I drove to the lookout of Mt. Washington in NH. Driving up was slow going, but down was 1st gear the entire way for 8 miles. My top speed might have been 20 in some straightaways with no one coming towards me to give my brakes a rest. Engine did hold me back at around that speed. I think I might have been up to 4500 RPMs. Going up transmission temperatures reached 188. Coming down maybe 175. Normal driving that day was 140-145. Pulled off once in a while to let the brakes cool because I could smell them once.

Did you use hill assist? That would have made the brakes smoke.
 

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I have never understood how "L" worked until recently someone explained it on this forum.
Initially, I assumed "L" was to manually shift the gears, up and down but this is not the case. Just like OP said "L" is for limit and does exactly what the OP said. In town I drive my truck in "L" and have it set at 5th gear, if i i know I'm gonna hit the high way I put it to 6 or 7. My truck drives better in "L".
That is exactly what I said. When you shift into L, assuming you are stopped, the truck's transmission shifts into 1sr gear. It remains locked in first gear unless you shift to another gear by manually pressing the up/down selector. As stated, if the OP placed the trans in L and drove around without using the manual up/down selector, he was driving the entire time in first gear and most likely overheated the transmission by burning the clutch plates. Testing the trans fluid will tell for certain, but judging from the description the OP gave, l would bet money on that being the case.

Then you have the Low gear of the transfer case which is an entirely different matter.
 

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2019 Colorado ZR2 CCSB 3.6L Summit White
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Brakes are a lot cheaper the transmissions lol, so I don’t rely on using lower gears alone when going down steep hills. Instead a combo of braking and keeping an eye on RPMs while using a lower gear gets the job done. The key is to keep the speed low enough to descend the hill safely.
 

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2017 Colorado ZR2
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That is exactly what I said. When you shift into L, assuming you are stopped, the truck's transmission shifts into 1sr gear. It remains locked in first gear unless you shift to another gear by manually pressing the up/down selector. As stated, if the OP placed the trans in L and drove around without using the manual up/down selector, he was driving the entire time in first gear and most likely overheated the transmission by burning the clutch plates. Testing the trans fluid will tell for certain, but judging from the description the OP gave, l would bet money on that being the case.

Then you have the Low gear of the transfer case which is an entirely different matter.
There is still a bit of a difference in what you are stating. You can put our truck son the shifter "L" and limit the amount of gears it will use but there are still safeties built in. It will go past 1st gear in temp situations and at max rpm for the highest gear selected. You are correct on if stopped it will automatically use 1st as the highest limit gear but will move to second if conditions are met to protect the transmission from failure. If shifted to L at speeds then it will select the gear it's in and disable overdrive. I can vouch for these conditions in my 17 zr2 when it was at 20k miles in Colorado doing a couple mountain passes. That was mostly a "test it out to see how things work" time to know the limits of the truck so it doesn't surprise me in certain situations later on.
 
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