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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been wanting to put together an all inclusive thread that lists the basic lifting options with links to popular products as well as what tires are generally considered an acceptable fit. This will be a work in progress so if you spot errors or omissions please feel free to correct me. I will be relying on many of you to fill in the gaps especially with taller lifts and more exotic lift kits. Please feel free to help by posting info and links to products or install threads that I can link to. I'll be adding photos of different types of lifts as well. I'll likely snag good examples from regular members. If you see a photo of your rig and don't want it used let me know and I'll swap it out.

So you are interested in lifting your Colorado/Canyon and your search has brought you here. Before you even start looking at lift kits and tires I want you to take a moment and think about what it is you use your truck for and what you would like to use it for. Be honest with yourself or else you may end up with something that doesn't work well for your needs or worse yet you break parts (or yourself). It's your truck and your money so get what makes you happy.

I'm going to list options that are commonly used to lift our trucks and where those options excel or fail. That doesn't mean you can't use any 1 of these options in an extreme situation. It just means you may not be happy with the results compared to a different option. Be aware that some kits are 2wd or 4wd specific and that some kits are not compatible with diesel engine equipped trucks or the kit will work differently. The product links below are simply for basic guidance. Double check the part numbers for your specific application before making a purchase.

Stock Truck Tire Size Fitment Reference:
OEM Sizes: 255/65/17, 265/65/17, 255/55/20, 265/60/18
Sizes known to fit with zero rubbing: 265/65/17, 255/70/17, 275/55/20? (Need confirmation on that last one)
*Sizes that fit with very little or no detrimental rubbing: 265/70/17, 255/70/17, 255/75/17
* = The more aggressive the tread design, larger shoulder lugs and/or E-Load (LT) tires may cause more rubbing than P-Load or less aggressive All-Terrain and Highway tires.

Largest tire that will fit in the spare tire location under the truck: P285/70/17, 265/70/17, 255/70/17, 255/75/17

Option #1 "Basic Leveling Lift" 1" to 2.5" Front Lift

This option is the most basic, cheapest and biggest bang for the buck lift you can do for you truck. It will like the front end of the truck by 1"-2" without a big hit to ride quality or the wallet. This is a great first lift for those with a brand new truck who's shocks are in great condition and do not plan on hardcore off-roading.

Example: 2016 Canyon with Rough Country 2" spacer lift. Top photo with Cooper Discoverer ATP 265/70/17. Bottom photo with OEM Wrangler Adventurer w/Kevlar 255/65/17


Pros:
Cheap
Easy to install
Looks the same as more expensive kits
Maintain factory ride characteristics
Doesn't require additional aftermarket parts to compensate for the lift (sway bar end links, diff drop, upper A-arms etc.)

Cons:
Loss of max suspension travel (less down travel, more up travel)
Maintains factory ride characteristics
*The 2" kits require you to dismantle the coilover to install a 1" retainer ring which make the install more complex and time consuming/expensive. The AutoSprings 2.5" spacer kit does not require coilover disassembly. Thanks @White016

Parts needed:
Spacer-style lift kit (Rough Country, Zone, Auto Springs etc.)

Acceptable Tire Sizes: *Assuming OEM wheels used
265/75/16 (2" lift, not sure with 1" lift)
265/65/17 (OEM Trail Boss and ZR2 tire size)
265/70/17 (may rub at full steering lock or full tuck off-road)
255/70/17
255/75/17 (may rub at full steering lock or full tuck off-road with less than 2" lift)

Option #2 "Basic Full Lift" 2"- 2.5" Front and 1" Rear Lift

This option is the same as Option #1 with the addition of 1" lift blocks for the rear leaf springs. This option is great for those who prefer a little bit of a raked stance and/or want more clearance at the rear bumper and/or tow heavy loads.

Example: 2016 Canyon with 2" Rough Country spacer lift and 265/70/17 Duratrac tires. Top photo with no rear lift. Bottom photo with 1" Silverado lift blocks. *photo has been edited to make the front and rear tires level due to sloped driveway.


Pros:
Cheap
Easy to install
Looks the same as more expensive kits
Maintain factory ride characteristics
Lifts the rear end higher than the front for off-road clearance and towing

Cons:
Loss of max suspension travel (less down travel, more up travel)
Maintains factory ride characteristics
Beyond the enhanced clearance this option doesn't help much off-road
*The 2" kits require you to dismantle the coilover to install a 1" retainer ring which make the install more complex and time consuming/expensive. The AutoSprings 2.5" spacer kit does not require coilover disassembly. Thanks @White016

Parts needed:
2" Spacer-style lift kit (Rough Country, Zone, Auto Springs etc.)
1" Lift Blocks (Silverado (#15885530)
4 Silverado or ZR2 U-bolts GM Part #11569811
Or
Autosprings Add-a-Leaf kit (1"-1.5" of lift and +750lb load capaciity)
Or
ZR2 Rear Leaf Springs (Driver side #84293345, Passenger side #84293346 - Link to install)

Acceptable Tire Sizes: *Assuming OEM wheels used
265/75/16 (2" lift, not sure with 1" lift)
265/65/17 (OEM Trail Boss and ZR2 tire size)
265/70/17 (may rub at full steering lock or full tuck off-road)
255/70/17
255/75/17

Option #3 "RHA Strut Leveling or Full Lift" .7" to 3" Front Lift and 1" - 1.5" Rear Lift

This option uses a Ride Height Adjustable (RHA) front strut with the OEM or aftermarket coil spring to lift the front of the truck. The strut has 3-4 ring lands that adjust where the spring perch sits and this raises the height of the truck. The higher you go the more compressed the spring becomes and the stiffer the ride. This option is great for those who want more than just good looks. The enhanced valving and higher end components of the aftermarket struts help reduce body roll and control wheel to ground contact both on an of-road. With the addition of aftermarket lift springs you will further decrease body roll and increase vehicle control. In off-road situations the stiffer spring and better dampening characteristics of the struts help reduce front end compression when rolling off rocks and small ledges.

Example: 2017 CCSB on 265/70/17. Lifted with Bilstein 5100 RHA front shocks at 2" and 1" Silverado Lift blocks in rear.


Example: 2018 CCSB and 2016 CCLB Canyon on P255/75/17s. Both trucks have the Eibach ProTruck kit set at 2.7" of front lift and 1" Silverado lift blocks in the rear.


The same suspension setup but with a Rough Country 1.5" body lift and 285/70/17 tires creates a dramatic difference. Photo courtesy of @asesino


Pros:
Moderately priced
Install is similar to a 2" spacer-type lift
Enhanced handling and control on and off-road
Retain or increase max suspension travel (depends on setting)
May not require additional aftermarket parts to compensate for the lift (sway bar end links, diff drop, upper A-arms etc.) if you stay at 2" or lower.

Cons:
Require you to dismantle the coilover to install the new strut which make the install more complex and time consuming/expensive.
Will require additional aftermarket parts to compensate for the lift (sway bar end links, diff drop, upper A-arms etc.) if you go above 2". Above 2.7" aftermarket upper control arms are recommended or else accelerated ball joint wear will occur.
May ride rough/stiff for some drivers who prefer a Cadillac style ride quality

Parts needed:
RHA Struts (Bilstein 5100, Eibach Pro-Truck)
1" Lift Blocks (Silverado (#15885530) or 1.5" blocks for the 3" lift
4 Silverado or ZR2 U-bolts GM Part #11569811
And/Or
Autosprings Add-a-Leaf kit (1"-1.5" of lift and +750lb load capaciity)
And/or
ZR2 Rear Leaf Springs (Driver side #84293345, Passenger side #84293346 - Link to install)
Additional Parts Needed
Sway Bar Extended End Links (Prothane #19-419
or Sway Bar Drop Brackets (example)
Differential Drop Kit (AutoSpring, Street Rays etc.)


Acceptable Tire Sizes: *Assuming OEM wheels used
265/75/16 (2" lift, not sure with less lift)
265/65/17
265/70/17
255/75/17 (may rub at full steering lock or full tuck off-road with less than 2" lift)
275/70/17 (fender trimming required)
285/70/17 (extensive fender trimming required and 2.7" or greater lift)

Option #4 "Baller Off-Road Lift" 2" to 3+" Front Lift and 2"+ Rear Lift

This is the lift of choice for those who are looking for maximum off-road capability, ride comfort, adjustability and load carrying in the case of overlanding.

Not really "baller" because the Eibach kit is relatively inexpensive but the look is the same. Front: Eibach Pro-Truck at 2.7", Rear: 1" Silverado blocks and 1" - 1.5" Autospring AAL on P285/70/17 tires. Fender height approx. 38" front, 40" rear.


Pros:
Maximum off-road capability
Increased suspension travel
Enhanced handling and ride both on and off road
Adjustable lift height (front)

Cons:
High Price
Aftermarket upper control arms may require more maintenance


Parts Needed:
Front coilover lift kit (Fox, Icon, King, Peak, etc.)
1+" Lift Blocks (Silverado (#15885530) or 1.5" blocks for the 3" lift
ZR2 Rear Leaf Springs (Driver side #84293345, Passenger side #84293346 - Link to install)
Or custom leaf springs (Deaver) or add-a-leaf for increased load capability
4 Silverado or ZR2 U-bolts GM Part #11569811
And/or
Autosprings Add-a-Leaf kit (1"-1.5" of lift and +750lb load capaciity)
And/or
2"-3" Lift Shackles (Wulf Suspension)
Additional Parts Needed
Sway Bar Extended End Links (Prothane #19-419
or Sway Bar Drop Brackets (example)
Differential Drop Kit (AutoSpring, Street Rays etc.)


Acceptable Tire Sizes: *Assuming OEM wheels used
265/75/16
265/65/17
265/70/17
255/75/17
275/70/17 (fender trimming required)
285/70/17 (extensive fender trimming required and 2.7" or greater lift, wheel spacers or lower offset wheels)
33x10.5x17 (less trimming than the 285)

Option #5 "Big Lift" 4"+

Pros:

Cons:

Parts Needed:

Acceptable Tire Sizes:
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Let's talk tires for a moment...... (section under construction)

I think the most common question asked on this forum is: "What is the largest tire I can fit on a stock Colorado/Canyon"

The answer is not easy to answer because there are variables to consider which include: the type, style and specific model and load rating of the tire, how the truck is used and in what conditions are the main concerns. It is also important to note that lifting the truck doesn't really create any more room for larger tires except in the case of off-road situations where you will be stuffing the wheel up into the wheel wells. If you are street driven only with mild forest-road or gravel driving then a stock height truck can fit the same tire as a truck with a 2" lift. So no, you don't need to lift the truck to fit a 265/70/17 tire.....

Let's start with this quick and dirty reference list for a stock truck based on my observations and opinion:

OEM wheel weights - Canyon SLE, All-Terrain , ZR2, Z71, LT, 17x8 +33 offset= 25.5lbs+-

Stock height truck and OEM wheels (use max tire diameter and tread width dimensions as a reference for 16"-20" tire sizes)

  • Street &Mild Off-road - 32.2" max diameter and 7.8" tread width approx. max (265/65/17, 265/70/17, 255/70/17, 255/75/17)
    Serious Off-road Safe Mode - 30.7" max diameter and 8.7" tread width
    *Serious Off-road ? - 31.7" max diameter and 8.5" tread width (based on an LT265/70/17 Duratrac or KO2) *note this size will likely rub in extreme terrain, especially when backing uphill in reverse with the wheel turned left or right.
OEM Tire Sizes: 255/65/17, 265/65/17, 255/55/20, 265/60/18
Known Sizes to fit with zero rubbing: 265/65/17
*Sizes that fit with very little or no detrimental rubbing: 265/70/17, 255/70/17, 255/75/17
* = The more aggressive the tread design, larger shoulder lugs and/or E-Load (LT) tires may cause more rubbing than P-Load or less aggressive All-Terrain and Highway tires. LT tires are generally larger in diameter due to deeper tread and more rubber in general. The also tend to offer more robust shoulder lugs that extend out further than P-load tires and thus decrease clearance when steering wheel is at full lock. This means a P255/75/17 tire may fit without rubbing on a stock truck but the same model tire in an LT255/75/17 tire would rub.

Example of a 265/70/17 tire in P and LT rating
P265/70/17 Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Diameter: 31.7"
Section width: 10.6"
Tread width: 8"
Tread depth: 13/32nds
Weight: 41.1lbs

LT265/70/17 Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Diameter: 31.9"
Section width: 10.7"
Tread width: 8.3"
Tread depth: 18/32nds
Weight: 50.9lbs

Tire rub on stock trucks with larger diameter tires (max of 265/70/17) tends to occur mostly on the front and sometimes rear of the fender liner. On lifted trucks the rubbing usually shifts to the frame. When you lift a truck the wheels tend to shift inward and are closer to the frame. This can be remedied by changing to a different offset wheel and/or adding spacers. Spacers are generally viewed as a last resort and are not recommended by many automotive authorities but thousands of people use them. Do your research!

Pros to running larger diameter tires
Increased ground clearance for the entire truck
A softer ride (compared to the exact same model of tire in a shorter size)
Better traction
Ability to air down more safely for off-road conditions
Looks cool

Cons to running larger diameter tires
Price of tire increases
Weight of tire increases and negatively affects fuel economy, braking, handling, acceleration and speeds up wear on suspension components
Handling is negatively affects. Taller sidewalls flex more so steering response is decreased and body roll is more pronounced

Example of clearance with an LT265/70/17 Wildpeak A/TW3 tire on a stock 2017 GMC Canyon. The tire did not rub until the 2" lift was added. Then it started lightly rubbing the frame.



Example of front tire tuck on a stock Canyon with P255/75/17 Geolandar AT G015


Example of clearance with a P255/75/17 Continental TerrainContact on a 2016 Canyon with a 2.7" lift. Notice the clearance is nearly the same as the above truck with no lift and very similar sized tires.


Example of clearance with a P255/75/17 Geolandar AT G015 on a 2018 Canyon with a 2.7" lift.



How to Calculate Odometer, Speedometer, Fuel Economy with Larger or Smaller Diameter Tires

You can simply order a tune for your truck or purchase the Hypertech Speedo Calibrator Module (or similar device) to correct for difference in tire sizes. If you decide not to tune then you can do some easy math to find the tire size difference and then calculate fuel economy and speedometer difference. You can do it using this calculator on Tacoma World which gets you close
https://www.tacomaworld.com/tirecalc

or this formula (revolutions per mile for a specific tire can be found on the Tire Rack website or the tire manufacturer's website)

OEM Tire revs per mile / New tire revs per mile = % difference x displayed miles driven = actual miles / gallons pumped = real fuel economy

Example:

OEM Goodyear Wrangler Kevlar 255/65/17 Revs per mile = 691
New Goodyear Wrangler Kevlar 265/70/17 revs per mile =660
Displayed Fuel Economy = 17.647

Formula at work: 691 / 660 = 1.047 x 300 miles displayed = 314.09 actual miles driven / 17 gallons pumped = 18.47mpg real fuel economy

18.47mpg - 17.647mpg = +0.823mpg difference


Once you know your multiplier number it's not a big deal to easily figure out your fuel economy long term. I do this while tracking my fuel economy on Fuelly.com. Using Fuelly will allow you to keep track of your true fuel economy long term and compare it to your Tripometer readings which will now be false because of the tire size difference.
 

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Could've used this back in December 2016. Thanks for this! Will be helpful for new owners.

I want to do the 2 inch level but as I told @Rpinaiii , just scared of having suspension issues.

Currently 265 70 17 K02s and KMC wheels.
 

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Thanks for putting this together. One question though, on the front spacer lift only you mention that 255/75R17 may rub at full lock. You don't mention this for the F+R Spacer lift or the RHA lift. Do you experience any rub with the RHA lift? I noticed in another thread you said you don't run any tire spacers and you have stock upper arms. I'm also curious if the 255/75R17 fits in the spare location.

I have a CCLB that I'm trying to make a little more capable. I had a few issues with breakover angle when I slid my transfer case shield across some waterbars while getting up to a lake. No damage outside scratches, but I'd like to not have to worry about it. My use is typically getting to camp sites, trailheads, and fishing holes. I'd just like to be able to keep up with a stock DCSB tacoma off-road since that's what my buddy has, so a 32" tire seems about the right size. I'm in Colorado, so decent snow tires for the road are a huge benefit and I mostly see dry dirt or rock when off road. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for putting this together. One question though, on the front spacer lift only you mention that 255/75R17 may rub at full lock. You don't mention this for the F+R Spacer lift or the RHA lift. Do you experience any rub with the RHA lift? I noticed in another thread you said you don't run any tire spacers and you have stock upper arms. I'm also curious if the 255/75R17 fits in the spare location.

I have a CCLB that I'm trying to make a little more capable. I had a few issues with breakover angle when I slid my transfer case shield across some waterbars while getting up to a lake. No damage outside scratches, but I'd like to not have to worry about it. My use is typically getting to camp sites, trailheads, and fishing holes. I'd just like to be able to keep up with a stock DCSB tacoma off-road since that's what my buddy has, so a 32" tire seems about the right size. I'm in Colorado, so decent snow tires for the road are a huge benefit and I mostly see dry dirt or rock when off road. Thank you.
Sorry for the confusion. I usually visit the site on a tablet. Making this thread I'm using a computer and can only sit in that position for so long gefore my neck starts aching so I stopped typing. :)

The 255/75/17 will work fine MOST of the time even without a lift but I did experience very light rub twice so included it in the description. I will add it to the the other options as well just in case someone does less than 2" of lift and/or they choose a very aggressive tire. In your case the 255/75/17 is a great choice and will help with breakover angle. My 2016 CCLB had a hell of a time with breakover angle because it was so long and tall tires is pretty much the only way to help with clearance. I don't think this size tire will fit in the spare location without removing the heat shield. If you get a rear flat in the field simply put the spare on the front and move a front tire to the rear.
 

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Sorry for the confusion. I usually visit the site on a tablet. Making this thread I'm using a computer and can only sit in that position for so long gefore my neck starts aching so I stopped typing. :)

The 255/75/17 will work fine MOST of the time even without a lift but I did experience very light rub twice so included it in the description. I will add it to the the other options as well just in case someone does less than 2" of lift and/or they choose a very aggressive tire. In your case the 255/75/17 is a great choice and will help with breakover angle. My 2016 CCLB had a hell of a time with breakover angle because it was so long and tall tires is pretty much the only way to help with clearance. I don't think this size tire will fit in the spare location without removing the heat shield. If you get a rear flat in the field simply put the spare on the front and move a front tire to the rear.

Just fit my new BFG KO2 255/75 R17 spare with the shield on. It will fit.
 

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This is supper usefull! So, I ordered fox 2.0 coliovers for the front with baja kits UCA and the 2.0 shocks for the rear. Fox says the coliovers lift the front 2" so I was thinking about geting 1" lift blocks for the rear eather icon or ebay ones https://wheelersoffroad.com/i-25489933-1-lift-block-kit-for-2015-colorado-canyon-78721.html?ref=category:1389157
Or
https://www.ebay.com/i/272829689178?chn=ps&ul_ref=https%3A%2F%2Frover.ebay.com%2Frover%2F1%2F711-117182-37290-0%2F2%3Fmpre%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.ebay.com%252Fi%252F272829689178%253Fchn%253Dps%26itemid%3D272829689178%26targetid%3D405043608364%26device%3Dm%26adtype%3Dpla%26googleloc%3D9031055%26poi%3D%26campaignid%3D962146729%26adgroupid%3D46733577494%26rlsatarget%3Dpla-405043608364%26abcId%3D1129816%26merchantid%3D6370904%26gclid%3DCjwKCAjwzenbBRB3EiwAItS-u_wD6vIWsHvG1PUfKa0X8Jn_9pkpeTudNUhfo2ZOwnUyyT0Hh3HfLRoCghEQAvD_BwE%26srcrot%3D711-117182-37290-0%26rvr_id%3D1638912688473%26rvr_ts%3D5a361a861650ad4cf5c5165effeff50f

(Any advice on witch ones would be helpful) But, I was wondering if I need the sway bar end links you recommended.
Also,
Right now I'm thinking about 265/70/17 with the method 309 but I'm tempted to go with the 285/70/17 but dont know how the 33" will fit. Any advice on that will be helpful.
Thanks for your help!

Instagram: Chevy_Cumrado
 

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@F8LZ71 you say you have to disassemble spring/shocks for 2" lift/levels. Not always, I have an AutoSprings kit that is a full 2 1/2" spacer only, no messing with springs.
 

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Spacers and extra weight in the rear

Hi all, new here. This is a great post, but I was hoping to see more about spacers incorporated as well.

I’ve got a Colorado Z71 that I put the RC 2” kit on the front, and the Icon 1” block in the back. In addition to that, I swapped out the rear shocks for the Fox 2.0’s, and am very impressed with those so far.

For wheels/tires, I ordered a set of 265/70/17 BFG Mud-Terrain KM3’s and have an appointment to get them installed on my stock Z71 rims on Monday. I’ve also got a set of 1.25” BORA Spacers for front and back that should be delivered on Monday as well. After install and an alignment, I’ll be sure to repost with the results along with a picture or 2.

I also I have an ARE Topper and have noticed that the additional weight has made the springs in the rear a little soft feeling. This was part of the reason for the upgrade to the Fox 2.0’s, and I’m also considering air helper springs. Has anyone else experienced soft/bouncy suspension in the rear due to a topper, additional weight, etc?
 

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Awesome thread but heh, did we really expect any less from the F8L :grin:

I ended up pulling the trigger on Fox 2.0s, half out of boredom waiting while the foreman works on my truck, half out of drooling over the adjustability of a "real" coilover setup. Likely will aim for a 1.5" height, with stock rear due to inane ECLB rake. Though, I've heard that they tend to net more than the intended setting, probably due to the stiff spring. Will have to tinker with that.

What are our options for recalibrating tire size for the speedo? 265/75R16 has always looked very enticing to me but I am wary of ECU programming if I do program, and speedo inaccuracy if I don't.
 

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Could've used this back in December 2016. Thanks for this! Will be helpful for new owners.

I want to do the 2 inch level but as I told @Rpinaiii , just scared of having suspension issues.

Currently 265 70 17 K02s and KMC wheels.
That's the exact setup I'd like to run.

You have no lift? Rubbing issues?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
@F8LZ71 you say you have to disassemble spring/shocks for 2" lift/levels. Not always, I have an AutoSprings kit that is a full 2 1/2" spacer only, no messing with springs.
Thanks buddy! Added that info in.

Hi all, new here. This is a great post, but I was hoping to see more about spacers incorporated as well.

I’ve got a Colorado Z71 that I put the RC 2” kit on the front, and the Icon 1” block in the back. In addition to that, I swapped out the rear shocks for the Fox 2.0’s, and am very impressed with those so far.

For wheels/tires, I ordered a set of 265/70/17 BFG Mud-Terrain KM3’s and have an appointment to get them installed on my stock Z71 rims on Monday. I’ve also got a set of 1.25” BORA Spacers for front and back that should be delivered on Monday as well. After install and an alignment, I’ll be sure to repost with the results along with a picture or 2.

I also I have an ARE Topper and have noticed that the additional weight has made the springs in the rear a little soft feeling. This was part of the reason for the upgrade to the Fox 2.0’s, and I’m also considering air helper springs. Has anyone else experienced soft/bouncy suspension in the rear due to a topper, additional weight, etc?
I am not familiar with wheel spacers and frankly they can really make it difficult to say what tire size will fit and what wont, especially when mixed in with non-OEM offset wheels. If someone has good knowledge of spacers and is willing to help me put it into words I would love to include the info. :)

How about those of us with 18" wheels & diesels?
I am not as familiar with the diesel or 18" and 20" tires. I'll work on adding that info but without trying them out myself I have to rely on info from other members. I'm back from my Alaska trip so I'll start researching the other wheel size options and adding that info.
 

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Zone leveling does not limit travel.

I run 245-70-17's. They are ideal for the I4 4x4. Keeping unsprung weight and diameter similar to stock maintains the best ride and performance. Larger diameter tires extend overall gear ratios, and in combination with being heavier really puts a hit on mileage and acceleration.



 

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What are our options for recalibrating tire size for the speedo? 265/75R16 has always looked very enticing to me but I am wary of ECU programming if I do program, and speedo inaccuracy if I don't.
I use the hypertec programmer for tire size/speedo calibration. Other options would be a tune of your choice or even the dealer. I really don't know if the dealer would do that for you but I bet they can.

The good news is if you don't your truck's mileage will rack up slower than it really is so that will help at trade/resell time. lol

On my old Colorado I never re-calibrated the speedo and it really is not a big deal, just be aware of your real speed so you don't get tickets.
 

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Great thread, thanks for this! I'm going through this process now and have been stumbling along the path to learn.

What's the verdict on sway bar drop kit vs long sway bar end links? Seems like the end links would be the way to go. I ended up ordering both while I wait for my King Coilovers to get built and shipped, figuring out which one I should end up installing.

Also, why would someone want to choose Deaver vs. Add-A-Spring vs. installing the ZR2 springs?
 

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Excellent thread F8L, thanks.

So, I had bought the Autospring Diff Drop kit for my 2016 Diesel, and had the shop attempt to install (Good shop, 30+ years in business, been using them for 18 years)

-Shop said the bolts were too short
-Called autospring about it, initially they said it wasnt spec'd for the diesel model, but a return call and a website check showed this was an error
-They said theyve never heard any feedback like that about the diesel models
-Im going to see about having the shop try again, they said theyd only charge me partial to do it again when I get the 'right kit'
-I know you have to wiggle and finesse the bolts in a bit, but what the heck?

Anybody have experiences with this kit on the diesel?
 
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