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16 Canyon SLT, V6, 4X4, Longbed, Cyber Metallic Gray
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Kendas are a heavy tire, and trying to get actual weights was a pain, I called a few places selling and they would nit even give me the weight.

I am running 275/55R20 kelly edge, made in Ohio, been a good all terrains tire, been good in heavy rain, not a mud tire, but I factored in weight and snow.
 

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Nokian Rotiiva AT Plus has pulled me away from bfgs forever. Discount tire has them, with warranty. Im on my second set. They make some of the best tires but the us buys the least of them for some reason. Youve prob heard of the hakkapelliitaa, their snow tire.
 

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When I was shopping I found that most of the tires were waaaayyyy heavier than the stock Goodyears, which would effect performance . I found through some research that Hankook DynaPros were within a pound or 2 of the stock tires , I bought a set and have been very happy with them. As a note I have always been a fan of BF Goodrich All Terrain KO2, Just thought I would add an option !
stocks are p rated, you were prob seeing e and c rated weights
 

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16 Canyon SLT, V6, 4X4, Longbed, Cyber Metallic Gray
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stocks are p rated, you were prob seeing e and c rated weights
Most off road tires are 10 ply (LRE)

Many that just want the look and never see off road besides driving in their yard, I am surprised there are nit more 4 ply aggressive looking tires.

If I am going through the woods, I will take my dodge, less worried about scratching paint lol
 

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2018 Colorado CCLB Z71 in Silver Ice Metallic
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I am going to throw in a plus 2 on the Toyo Open Country AT3. Same 3 peak rating and one of the lightest tires. Had mine on for 5 months and they are incredible in all weather conditions.
 
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2020 Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab Short Box LT
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I ran BFG AT's for many years on S Blazers from an 83 to a 2000 ZR2. I will tell you while they do most everything well, they don't do any one thing great except off road with confidence. Not great in mud, snow, or pavement. They typically last 40000 to 45000 miles.

I've had experience with Yokohama Geolander's on the aforementioned ZR2 Blazer (31'' tires) and my current work vehicle a RAM 1500. On the ZR2 they were great on the road but terrible on ice or snow. On the RAM 1500 (with full payload) they are great on the road and good in inclement traction. I haven't driven the Geolander AT X but they look like they would be better off road while giving up some road ability. I think the regular Geolander's would work great for you for commuting and hard pack. A more aggressive tire would be better for any major hills off road.
 

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Before you buy any tire you should read the tire reviews on the manufacturer's site and or and large reputable tire dealer's site. Discount tire has a wealth of tire user reviews. Be sure to read some recent reviews as some manufacturers like Cooper and Firestone have changed their compound recently with unfavorable results.
 

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I would 3rd the Toyo Open Country AT3, I bought the AT2 's right before the at3's came out, just about the same weight as my OEM Duratracs(nothing wrong with the duratracs though) I just went to a larger c-rated tire.
fyi: Nitto;s and Toyo are made in the same plant in Georgia
or the Rotiva Plus mentioned above

for a daily driver and some mud and stuff I would stay with a tire in the 40 pound range which will be a c-d rated tire
 
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2017 Chevy Colorado Z71 3.6 4X4. Bilstein 6112/5160 +2.4" up front
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Can someone explain the letter ratings?
 

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Can someone explain the letter ratings?
Basically it's the strength rating of the tire. The further along the alphabet, the stronger and stiffer the tire is, and the more weight it can safely support. In the stone ages, there was a "ply" rating which was just the number of layers the tire casing had. The alphabet rating is just the equivalent to multiples of two ply. Tire tech is much better nowadays so a three ply tire can be as strong as an old 10 ply.

It starts with a basic "P-rated" or "SL" as in passenger car or standard load rated tire. It will be the softest and least capable of carrying heavy loads. Basically anything under a 4 ply. Then B rated is 4 ply, C is 6 ply, D is 8 ply, E is 10ply, etc.

For comparison's sake, a C rated tire is rated for around 2700#. The same tire in E is rated for around 3200#. You can basically haul 2000# more with E's without risking a blowout.

There are lots of debates on which you should choose for offroading. Stiffness is stronger, but there is a point where you don't need that much stiffness and strength. Especially if you have a light weight truck, or like to go slow. If I had my way, I would be on C's or less. We don't need almost 13,000# of carrying capacity. Our GVWR is only 6000#.
 

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Before you buy any tire you should read the tire reviews on the manufacturer's site and or and large reputable tire dealer's site. Discount tire has a wealth of tire user reviews. Be sure to read some recent reviews as some manufacturers like Cooper and Firestone have changed their compound recently with unfavorable results.
Most tire reviews are completely worthless. The average tire consumer has just about zero qualifications to give us any credible information about any tires performance. "this tire is great in the mud" - without knowing the drivers skill level, what kind of mud they were attempting to drive in and any number of other variables, including what the reviewer's opinion is in reference to, all combined to make stuff you read on websites that sell tires, worthless.

Of course, you may find my review of your opinion worthless as well :)
 

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Basically it's the strength rating of the tire. The further along the alphabet, the stronger and stiffer the tire is, and the more weight it can safely support. In the stone ages, there was a "ply" rating which was just the number of layers the tire casing had. The alphabet rating is just the equivalent to multiples of two ply. Tire tech is much better nowadays so a three ply tire can be as strong as an old 10 ply.

It starts with a basic "P-rated" or "SL" as in passenger car or standard load rated tire. It will be the softest and least capable of carrying heavy loads. Basically anything under a 4 ply. Then B rated is 4 ply, C is 6 ply, D is 8 ply, E is 10ply, etc.

For comparison's sake, a C rated tire is rated for around 2700#. The same tire in E is rated for around 3200#. You can basically haul 2000# more with E's without risking a blowout.

There are lots of debates on which you should choose for offroading. Stiffness is stronger, but there is a point where you don't need that much stiffness and strength. Especially if you have a light weight truck, or like to go slow. If I had my way, I would be on C's or less. We don't need almost 13,000# of carrying capacity. Our GVWR is only 6000#.
This^

And to expand on it the P-rated comes standard on our trucks and will handled any weight you throw at it rating wise. Those heavier tires (E especially) will ride worse, increase braking distances, slow down acceleration and reduce mpg as well as speed up wear on the suspension as the added weight impacts all of that.

Some who regular rocky areas and the desert with cactus like the higher rated tires for the added ability to resist punctures. Truth be told though if you are venturing off road airing down is best. It increase the ride comfort, reduces the impact on the environment and can generally help in most instances from getting stuck or having a puncture. An aired down P-rated tire should do better then a street pressure higher rated C rated tires head to head for resisting punctures. I have been in the back country many of times in aired down P rated tires and haven't had an issue, it certainly can happen but for most of my daily driving the P rated with the slightly elevated chance of a puncture was a worthwhile trade off for a more compliant ride and better all around performance. I also carry a good proper size spare as well.

For a rig that most weekends sees off road work or spends a good portion of its life towing/hauling near the weight capacity on longer trips I would go with a higher ply tire.

Tyler
 

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Where I hunt in Kansas over the years I have cut the side walls on c-d and e rated tires. About once every couple years. Finally figure how they were getting cut. Seems where I cut across a cattle trail going up hill there are sharp rocks sticking out. Most of it is soft sand stone but towards the top of the hills it is a hard sharp rocks under the top soil/grass..
 
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There are way to many options and I want to hear some peoples opinions and thoughts on tires. Im between a few.... Kenda Klever RT, YOKOHAMA GEOLANDAR X-AT, GOODYEAR WRANGLER DURATRAC, BFG K02, and the Nitto Ridge Grappler.
I’ve got the Les Schwab brand of Manama open range and they are the best tires for snow, rain, ice, mud and sand. Had them siped and 30k Miles later they still are whisper quiet and tread looks new.
 

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I have had good luck with Cooper Dicoverer AT3's. Good on and off road, and they handled the snow like a champ. As well, I believe Cooper is one of the few tire manufacturers that still make tires in the US, for whatever that's worth.
 

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I cannot believe you don’t have the Falken Wildpeaks on your list. I’ve had them in snow, mud and dirt. They are simply fantastic. They are a lot better, IMO, than KO2’s in the snow and mud. Probably a toss-up on dirt.
 

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This 100%, can't just say help me pick a tire and not give any details, otherwise we will have to assume based on the tire choices given this is strictly for looks on a pavement princess. So much goes in to choosing a set of tires. What terrain will they see, is price a concern, what about tire wear, mpg, noise, weight, etc. Give some more details and a better choice can be made.

I spent probably a few months leading up to the replacement of mine checking reviews (on many forums as well), being honest with my driving and the terrain it will see and how often as well as other things. I realized after owning an aggressive set of AT tires I prefer a mild AT as probably 95% of my driving is to work and around towing as well as some towing and inclement weather. I wanted something quieter and got descent mpg, kept the price reasonable but also would be able to handle the trails out west. When I did the white rim trail and alpine loop specifically that is more than probably 98% of the owners here will ever put their truck through and even my aggressive AT tires were more than the trials needed, so I knew a mild AT would fit the bill as I was tired of the tire noise (especially after they wore down; I can only imagine how annoying daily a hybrid tire or even an MT could be...). I wasn't looking to go through mud bogs or slide my truck on class 5+ trails and with how good tire tech has been getting even mild AT tires are performing admirably in mud and snow. Sticking with a P-rated tire was fine for the occasional trails and a P-rated AT tire is plenty tough and able to with stand punctures when aired down which is important off road, plus air it up to tow and it gives a good ride without dropping mpg much on the daily commute or performance.

Tyler
Exactly.

My 2017 ZR2 has Kenda KR29 LT245/70R17E tires on the stock wheels. I choose them after reading Australian magazine tests where they take a dozen or so vehicle to the outback with different tires on each and explain how each tire did under every condition. My priority was not getting a puncture on the volcanic rock that is all over Wyoming and Idaho. Airing down is very important too as others have mentioned. My tires are loud and heavy, and extremely puncture resistant. They seem to wear well, but are compromised in other areas.

Tyler; I used to have 1970 AMX - I miss that car. It has a 360 with a close ratio 4 speed.
 

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When I bought my used 15 Colorado it had Falken Wildpeck AT3 on it. They run smooth down the road and are wearing good. They do good in the rain and snow. The price are around $150 a tire but they are worth it.
 

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There are way to many options and I want to hear some peoples opinions and thoughts on tires. Im between a few.... Kenda Klever RT, YOKOHAMA GEOLANDAR X-AT, GOODYEAR WRANGLER DURATRAC, BFG K02, and the Nitto Ridge Grappler.
There are way to many options and I want to hear some peoples opinions and thoughts on tires. Im between a few.... Kenda Klever RT, YOKOHAMA GEOLANDAR X-AT, GOODYEAR WRANGLER DURATRAC, BFG K02, and the Nitto Ridge Grappler.
There are way to many options and I want to hear some peoples opinions and thoughts on tires. Im between a few.... Kenda Klever RT, YOKOHAMA GEOLANDAR X-AT, GOODYEAR WRANGLER DURATRAC, BFG K02, and the Nitto Ridge Grappler.
I have Goodyear Wranglers and at 35000 miles they slip all over in the rain. I think I’ll get Michelin’s LTX next time, I have always had good luck with them.
 
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