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Discussion Starter #1
Interesting article, would love to here more about how this manufacturing method increases the volume of the bed. A reduction of 62 pounds in today's world of trucks is a pretty nice weight reduction. If they can get the costs reasonable, could be a game changer in the world of truck beds. I would like to see a carbon fiber bed in our trucks with the "bed volume increase" meaning a 48" sheet of plywood would fit flat in the bed.

In the costs category, does away with the need for bedliners and such, so that is roughly a $400 savings to offset a higher cost bed.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/autos-trucks/2019-gmc-sierra-carbon-fiber-bed-how-its-made/ar-BBWk71N?li=BBnb4R5&ocid=mailsignout
 

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they pushed the bed sides out to with in a 1/4 inch of outside sheet metal, I think the inside of bed is 7 inches wider then last years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
they pushed the bed sides out to with in a 1/4 inch of outside sheet metal, I think the inside of bed is 7 inches wider then last years.
Is that just the overall width, or is that the width at the wheel wells? All I want is about 4" more width at wheel wells on my Canyon to lay that 4x8 sheet flat. Actually, 5" would get MDF sheets that are 49" wide.
 

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I expect with a little time we will see more of these. The cost are coming down and the durability appears to be good in testing will see how the real world deals with it.

This material in molded carbon will show up in other parts like mirrors and other other parts like doors, hoods etc.
 

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GM has been talking about getting away from a steel bed at least since the mid 90's when I started working with purchasing. Back then it was composite material, similar to what is used in drop in bed liners. The idea has always appealed to me, since I live where rust never sleeps. Carbon fiber seems like a great idea, but I wonder how durable the surface is from the very things that spray in liners protect against: cuts, gouges and abrasions? Also, while saving weight is a plus for mileage, it's a minus for winter or wet pavement traction, especially on a two wheel drive vehicle that's already light in the rear end. I also wonder about repairs, or if repairs are even possible. If you're in an accident and the bed gets cracked, can it be fixed or does the whole bed need to be replaced?
 

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Can’t wait for the Ford retaliation commercial...
When they threw the tool box or dumped load of cinderblocks from 4 feet it put small holes in the aluminum bed...they went right through the “plastic” bed...
 

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GM has been talking about getting away from a steel bed at least since the mid 90's when I started working with purchasing. Back then it was composite material, similar to what is used in drop in bed liners. The idea has always appealed to me, since I live where rust never sleeps. Carbon fiber seems like a great idea, but I wonder how durable the surface is from the very things that spray in liners protect against: cuts, gouges and abrasions? Also, while saving weight is a plus for mileage, it's a minus for winter or wet pavement traction, especially on a two wheel drive vehicle that's already light in the rear end. I also wonder about repairs, or if repairs are even possible. If you're in an accident and the bed gets cracked, can it be fixed or does the whole bed need to be replaced?
I have been watching these beds an for a while keeping up on molded Carbon parts.

From what I have seen the bed is tougher than steel. It is not prone to scuffs or gouges. The real world will be the ultimate test.

Repairs are similar according to GM to the Corvette. The outer steel is a bolt on so it is an easy change.

So far GM has had answers I am good with. I just need to see what one looks like after it is used in the real world.

GM as well as others have invested much in this form of molded composites. They would like to use them in other areas like mirrors, body panels and supports internally.

While this is not aerospace quality stuff it works well for automotive. The key was to reduce cost and eliminating the time in an autoclave cuts cost and speeds production.

You might remember the plastic bed option about 20 years ago. GM was quiet about the option as they did have quality issues. But they stuck with it and look to be onto something.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
GM has been talking about getting away from a steel bed at least since the mid 90's when I started working with purchasing. Back then it was composite material, similar to what is used in drop in bed liners. The idea has always appealed to me, since I live where rust never sleeps. Carbon fiber seems like a great idea, but I wonder how durable the surface is from the very things that spray in liners protect against: cuts, gouges and abrasions? Also, while saving weight is a plus for mileage, it's a minus for winter or wet pavement traction, especially on a two wheel drive vehicle that's already light in the rear end. I also wonder about repairs, or if repairs are even possible. If you're in an accident and the bed gets cracked, can it be fixed or does the whole bed need to be replaced?
Can’t wait for the Ford retaliation commercial...
When they threw the tool box or dumped load of cinderblocks from 4 feet it put small holes in the aluminum bed...they went right through the “plastic” bed...
A different article I read a few weeks ago stated the bed was tougher than steel and had passed the tool box drop test. Time will tell.
 

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For testing in the "real world" I think we may have to wait for them to be offered on something other than the Denali. Not sure what the Sierra AT4 is, but on the Denali I just don't see a lot of owners using them as a work truck.
 

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A different article I read a few weeks ago stated the bed was tougher than steel and had passed the tool box drop test. Time will tell.
Yeah...until the bed gets bumped in a fender bender and shatters...no thanks...
 

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For testing in the "real world" I think we may have to wait for them to be offered on something other than the Denali. Not sure what the Sierra AT4 is, but on the Denali I just don't see a lot of owners using them as a work truck.
I see a number of Denali trucks used by contractors.

But the real world will be the real test as the public can come up with things engineers are not stupid enough to think up on their own.

Never underestimate the public. :grin2:
 

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Outer panels are steel. They bolt on and off according to the media.
Yes but the “plastic is pushed out to within 1/4” of the sheetmetal” so bending the bedside very much will result in also bending the plastic...crack...
 

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Yeah...until the bed gets bumped in a fender bender and shatters...no thanks...
I was thinking the same thing. Wonder what's going to happen when it's -30C and you have a fender bender?
 

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I was thinking the same thing. Wonder what's going to happen when it's -30C and you have a fender bender?
If the metal bedsides get pushed in enough to flex the carbon fiber ....I would bet on cracks or pieces.
 

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Carbon fiber can flex quite a bit before shattering. Look at the Boeing 787 wings or a golf club shaft.

I don't know how the auto repair industry works, but it wouldn't surprise me if an accident was bad enough to damage a carbon fiber bed that it would also be bad enough that a steel bed would be replaced. Also, there was some talk in the articles about repair of the carbon fiber bed being similar to repair of a Vette, so it may even be that replacement would be more likely with the steel bed if carbon fiber can be repaired.
 
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