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What EXACTLY do you think happened to the pump? Do you even know for sure the problem was the pump? Did you check the fuel pressure? I'm guessing you were just guessing it was the pump. No?

Not trying to be an ass, just curious.

I think it's a good thing when pumps fail when you are low on fuel, makes it easier to change ;)

Seen my fair share of full tanks too though. It takes longer to remove and replace the fuel than replace the pump.
:laugh:

Honestly, that day, it behaved like it ran out of fuel. I'm convinced that the pump overheated and locked up or vapor locked. I let it sit on the side of the road for 10-15 minutes. Then I cycled the key a few times to make sure I could hear the pump run, then I looked at the fuel level. Drove to the gas station ( one was literally less than 5 minutes away ) and filled up. No problem the rest of the day or a decade later. It was hotter than hell that day. I really wish I could have checked the pressure, but it's not like I keep that in the car all the time. Besides, I never had a reason to before, so it was never suspect. Either way, I'd bet the damn car that the gauge would have read nothing. I really can't say for sure an overheated pump was the problem, but everything was pointing in that direction. Even now, I fill up at a half a tank. I've been fortunate enough that the only cars I've had that needed fuel pump work had a trap door in the floor. So much easier!
 

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I'd argue it's impossible to constantly run the tank near empty, because you'll run out of gas. Maybe they're assuming someone would repeatedly fill the tank with $1 of gas. DON'T DO THAT! ;-)
I've known people that do that. Maybe not a dollar, but like 3 or 4. Nowadays you need at least $10 to run constantly low.
:rofl

I remember putting 5 bucks in when I was a kid, but gas was a buck a gallon and I was poor. Also, pumps were on the side of the block and had diaphragms not gears.
 

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Honestly, that day, it behaved like it ran out of fuel. I'm convinced that the pump overheated and locked up or vapor locked. I let it sit on the side of the road for 10-15 minutes. Then I cycled the key a few times to make sure I could hear the pump run, then I looked at the fuel level. Drove to the gas station ( one was literally less than 5 minutes away ) and filled up. No problem the rest of the day or a decade later. It was hotter than hell that day. I really wish I could have checked the pressure, but it's not like I keep that in the car all the time. Besides, I never had a reason to before, so it was never suspect. Either way, I'd bet the damn car that the gauge would have read nothing. I really can't say for sure an overheated pump was the problem, but everything was pointing in that direction. Even now, I fill up at a half a tank. I've been fortunate enough that the only cars I've had that needed fuel pump work had a trap door in the floor. So much easier!
I had luck getting a dead pump going by smacking the bottom of the tank. This is a very temporary solution though. ;)

Not too long ago a friend had me cut a hole out of his truck bed and put hinges on it for easy access. He has had so many pumps go bad he carries one with him. Early 2000s Chev Silverado. Maybe he runs it close to empty all the time?? :)
 

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All modern tanks since the late 60s have more capacity than stated so the fuel can expand on a hot day. My shop teacher told me that back in the 50s on a hot day you could walk through a parking lot and see gas puddles next to many cars.

Most manufactures don’t state the added space in the capacity anymore.

Running low and running the pump is a wives tale. Sure you might have found something about not doing it, but you are also supposed to oil your garage door once a month, have you ever done it? Did it wear out prematurely?

Vapor lock was common on carbureted cars because the fuel sits in a bowl in the carb and boils. It would also heat up on the way in the fuel line because it would move slow. Putting clothes pins on the fuel line would absorb the heat and prevent it in a pinch.
 

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I once saw a survey “Are you a procrastinator?” And one of the questions was “Do you wait for the low fuel light to come on before filling up?”

That is not procrastinating, it is being time efficient. The extra time spent in the gas station is not worth it for a slight possibility of fuel pump failure. Even if I made minimum wage it would not be worth the extra hour a month in the gas station.
 

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I once saw a survey “Are you a procrastinator?” And one of the questions was “Do you wait for the low fuel light to come on before filling up?”

That is not procrastinating, it is being time efficient. The extra time spent in the gas station is not worth it for a slight possibility of fuel pump failure. Even if I made minimum wage it would not be worth the extra hour a month in the gas station.
Hour a month to fill at about a 1/4 compared to say an 1/8th? Your math is very flawed.
 

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All modern tanks since the late 60s have more capacity than stated so the fuel can expand on a hot day. My shop teacher told me that back in the 50s on a hot day you could walk through a parking lot and see gas puddles next to many cars.

Most manufactures don’t state the added space in the capacity anymore.

Running low and running the pump is a wives tale. Sure you might have found something about not doing it, but you are also supposed to oil your garage door once a month, have you ever done it? Did it wear out prematurely?

Vapor lock was common on carbureted cars because the fuel sits in a bowl in the carb and boils. It would also heat up on the way in the fuel line because it would move slow. Putting clothes pins on the fuel line would absorb the heat and prevent it in a pinch.
sorry but....

Yeah, we all know how much wood conducts heat. I remember seeing this and laughing at it as a young mechanic 40 years ago. Thanks for the memories.
 

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I filled up at 1/4 tank this week--because I saw diesel for 20 cents less than just about anywhere. I was passing through part of an Indian reservation where they don't have to charge state taxes. :-D (If I'd driven further I could have saved 10 more cents!)
 

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Discussion Starter #49
There's so much conflicting information in this thread especially regarding when to fill up. I just fill up when I'm close to E because less gas = less weight = better MPG. Just from intuition alone, I feel like you aren't going to damage your vehicle by waiting to fuel up when the low fuel light comes on.
 

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Running low and running the pump is a wives tale. Sure you might have found something about not doing it, but you are also supposed to oil your garage door once a month, have you ever done it? Did it wear out prematurely?
Do what you want, I was merely pointing out that the manufacturer of the pump (and many others I didn't quote) says running it low on fuel will likely cause premature failure.

I do actually oil my door hinges, change filters in my furnace, blow out my sprinklers for the winter, and lots of other things that experts recommend as preventative maintenance. My stuff lasts a very long time because I take care of it. I have appliances that are older than you and still work just fine. If you choose to ignore that advice, that's fine.

Your choice. You do you.
 

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The last truck I had I drove it so much (6 days a week 200 miles a day on average) and its use was for field service. I had that thing so figured out because I spent so much time in it, I could drive it down to a half gallon in the tank and did so all the time. I put 325K on that truck and never had an issue with any fuel related items. I am diligent about maintenance and this being said I did occasionally change fuel filter which most people never do on a Gasser...
 

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Running low and running the pump is a wives tale. Sure you might have found something about not doing it, but you are also supposed to oil your garage door once a month, have you ever done it? Did it wear out prematurely?
Do what you want, I was merely pointing out that the manufacturer of the pump (and many others I didn't quote) says running it low on fuel will likely cause premature failure.

I do actually oil my door hinges, change filters in my furnace, blow out my sprinklers for the winter, and lots of other things that experts recommend as preventative maintenance. My stuff lasts a very long time because I take care of it. I have appliances that are older than you and still work just fine. If you choose to ignore that advice, that's fine.

Your choice. You do you.
Some things in life my time is more valuable than worrying about a couple hundred dollar repair.
I have lots of old stuff too and several cars with over 200k miles and never worried about when to fill up or warmed them up for more than 10 seconds in the morning. But warming up is a whole other argument 🙂
 

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Put 25 gallons in my 2019 this morning


You have a V6. Are you trying to kill your evap system? If you keep topping it off that much then you’re going to have problems. 1-2 clicks and stop, no more.


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I have never killed any of my evap systems, in any of the many, many trucks I have owned, I'm a hvy truck technician, and there was still about 2 gallons in the tank, my low fuel light has just came on

I thought my gage was bad, just under 1/2 tank and I was putting in 18 gallons! so I ran this tank all the way down
 

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I have never killed any of my evap systems, in any of the many, many trucks I have owned, I'm a hvy truck technician, and there was still about 2 gallons in the tank, my low fuel light has just came on



I thought my gage was bad, just under 1/2 tank and I was putting in 18 gallons! so I ran this tank all the way down


Diesel trucks don’t have evap systems to kill, so being a heavy truck tech you should know that.

If you only did 1-2 clicks and got 25 gallons there’s something wonky. If you’re topping the tank off until it reaches the top of the filler neck then you’re just asking for trouble. This is even covered in the owners manual.



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I thought my gage was bad, just under 1/2 tank and I was putting in 18 gallons! so I ran this tank all the way down
If you only did 1-2 clicks and got 25 gallons there’s something wonky.
Again I would suspect the pump. Monteholic, are both these situations from the same station or same pump? If your low fuel warning had just come on I don't see how you could possibly put 25 gallons in.
 

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I stopped at the second click

and using that method isn't very fool-proof

gas pumps are calibrated every year to very strict amounts so if any of you think a gas pump is off that much, you are very wrong

I am responsible for 9 fueling meters at the aviation company I work for and have years of experience with fueling systems, gas station pumps are basically the same just on a smaller level and smaller tolerances, the tolerance for our 3" meters is 1 gallon +/- per 500 gallons dispensed
 

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Old wive's tale. The fuel pumps are cooled by fuel/gas flowing THROUGH them and not by being submerged IN the fuel.

It's similar to the argument that running low will suck up more crap from the bottom of the tank. Fuel is ALWAYS pulled from the bottom of the tank, if there's crap down there then it will get disturbed and sucked up no matter what the fuel level is.
partially incorrect. it being submerged in the fuel as well as fuel pumping thru the pump is what cools it.


the saying goes i've never replaced a fuel pump in an empty tank...
 
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