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Hello , recently drained the front/ rear diff to replace the gear oil. Rear diff fluid looked fine, however the front diff had a milky color to it. I'm pretty cautious about going through water so I doubt there could be contamination. I've never noticed fluid leaks in my driveway so I believe the seal is fine. The drain plug magnet didn't have any unusual pieces of metal and the buildup was similar to the rear. Anyone else have this issue ?
 

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Milky usually means water.....

I would research 'where' the diff breather is. According to this thread - its located pretty high. Which is good....

http://coloradofans.com/forums/61-general-truck-chat/165377-front-diff-breather.html

I would inspect the diff breather and all its connections. Usually, there's a male hose fitting in the diff and rubber hoses attached via hose clamps. Check to make sure everything is attached and tight.
 

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Already have a 100k miles on it?
 

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How often do you exercise the front differential? I would think it's condensation, every street 4X4 I have owned would show indications of moisture in the front diff. Trucks that saw a lot of 4X4 did not have the problem. It takes a lot of driving with the front diff engaged to get hot enough to burn of moisture.
 

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The how's or why's its milky isn't the problem....the problem is you leaving it in there.

Yes, find the problem and correct it but milky = water = insufficient lubrication. Whether you bring it to the dealer or do it yourself, do it sooner rather than later.
 

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How often do you exercise the front differential? I would think it's condensation, every street 4X4 I have owned would show indications of moisture in the front diff. Trucks that saw a lot of 4X4 did not have the problem. It takes a lot of driving with the front diff engaged to get hot enough to burn of moisture.
No kidding? Enough condensation to make the oil milky? That seems impossible, but I'm no 4x4 expert. I think someone changed the oil with chocolate milk. I say taste it to find out.

:grin2:
 
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Thanks for the advice , I'll check the vent hose. And I have 65k on it now. Do you recommend taking it into the dealership ?
If you know how to change the oil I would say you could find a bad/loose vent hose and fix it. Not a big deal I think. Any oil leaks at the axles or driveshaft? If so the water could get in that way too. I say save yourself the headache and $ and check it over yourself.
 
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Sounds plausible to me. Many moons ago I toured Glacier Park, Alberta and BC on a little R65 with an engine oil cooler. It was thermostatically controlled but I suspect still ran way too cool. At the end of the trip I drained the chocolate milk out of the crank case and added oil. I know the bike would have blown some moisture past the rings but I suspect the front diff in 2WD runs much cooler.

No kidding? Enough condensation to make the oil milky? That seems impossible, but I'm no 4x4 expert. I think someone changed the oil with chocolate milk. I say taste it to find out.

:grin2:
 

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Sounds plausible to me. Many moons ago I toured Glacier Park, Alberta and BC on a little R65 with an engine oil cooler. It was thermostatically controlled but I suspect still ran way too cool. At the end of the trip I drained the chocolate milk out of the crank case and added oil. I know the bike would have blown some moisture past the rings but I suspect the front diff in 2WD runs much cooler.
interesting. Maybe I don't see that kind of thing because where I live the winters are pretty mild???

But really don't know, I don't recall ever seeing milk in a front diff. Didn't really work on a lot of them either though. I guess I'll check mine at about 50k or so if I still have it...
 

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I've set up a few. It's a very critical process and correct tooling is an absolute must.



interesting. Maybe I don't see that kind of thing because where I live the winters are pretty mild???

But really don't know, I don't recall ever seeing milk in a front diff. Didn't really work on a lot of them either though. I guess I'll check mine at about 50k or so if I still have it...
 

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And on a more useful note...

I changed mine out to Redline 75W-90 at 13k. My front diff fluid drained out looking fairly new but I figured the output/spider gears are fairly busy in 2WD so I wanted to check.
The rear fluid really looked nasty but I have seen others post that theirs looked new. I suspect my rear housing was dirty on assembly. It's changed out with the same stuff now - so it's clean.

Anyway - no evidence of moisture in my PDX based gears at 13k.



interesting. Maybe I don't see that kind of thing because where I live the winters are pretty mild???

But really don't know, I don't recall ever seeing milk in a front diff. Didn't really work on a lot of them either though. I guess I'll check mine at about 50k or so if I still have it...
 

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This was a Torsen going into a carrier for a '99~'04 Mustang Cobra IRS pumpkin. I set the pinion and ring preload by feel. It took a few pinion reinstalls but the accel and decel wear patterns checked out perfect with Prussian blue. The IRS assembly was transplanted into a formerly solid axle '96 Mustang Cobra. The car ran much quieter than OEM with no driveline clunk. In the end the car still drove like crap because of the late 80's Fairmont front end. That 3 degree caster was never intended for wide performance rubber. I briefly thought about an aftermarket front subframe and A-arms, then went to my friendly BMW dealer and ordered an '05 M3. I enjoyed that for 11 years but eventually sold it and bought the Collie as life's interests tend to change.

My first car was a '65 MG Midget that I bought for $625 with 110k miles. It forced me to become a reasonable mechanic. My choice any given day was to forge new ground mechanically or to learn appreciation for my current location. I sold the little beast for 4x what I had paid 13 years later with 225k miles.
The Diesel Collie gets better mileage. Ha!

Did this wander off-topic? Hmmm...

Chuck_B

A woodworkers way of checking carrier preload? LOL
 

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This was a Torsen going into a carrier for a '99~'04 Mustang Cobra IRS pumpkin. I set the pinion and ring preload by feel. It took a few pinion reinstalls but the accel and decel wear patterns checked out perfect with Prussian blue. The IRS assembly was transplanted into a formerly solid axle '96 Mustang Cobra. The car ran much quieter than OEM with no driveline clunk. In the end the car still drove like crap because of the late 80's Fairmont front end. That 3 degree caster was never intended for wide performance rubber. I briefly thought about an aftermarket front subframe and A-arms, then went to my friendly BMW dealer and ordered an '05 M3. I enjoyed that for 11 years but eventually sold it and bought the Collie as life's interests tend to change.

My first car was a '65 MG Midget that I bought for $625 with 110k miles. It forced me to become a reasonable mechanic. My choice any given day was to forge new ground mechanically or to learn appreciation for my current location. I sold the little beast for 4x what I had paid 13 years later with 225k miles.
The Diesel Collie gets better mileage. Ha!

Did this wander off-topic? Hmmm...

Chuck_B
ahaha, yeah a little off topic! Yep I've had my fair share of cars that forced me to become a better mechanic too. Lack of $ doesn't help either....Never had the pleasure of making that much money on one though. :(
 

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Good percentage gain, small dollar gain. Haven't done that since.
Thinking back, it was certainly the most fun per $ of anything I have owned. Some of that undoubtedly had something to do with youth...





ahaha, yeah a little off topic! Yep I've had my fair share of cars that forced me to become a better mechanic too. Lack of $ doesn't help either....Never had the pleasure of making that much money on one though. :(
 

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And on a more useful note...

I changed mine out to Redline 75W-90 at 13k. My front diff fluid drained out looking fairly new but I figured the output/spider gears are fairly busy in 2WD so I wanted to check.
The rear fluid really looked nasty but I have seen others post that theirs looked new. I suspect my rear housing was dirty on assembly. It's changed out with the same stuff now - so it's clean.

Anyway - no evidence of moisture in my PDX based gears at 13k.
What do you mean you suspect the rear was dirty on assembly? Dirty with what? What would make it look so nasty at 13k and not cause damage? Crap, maybe I should change mine with something synthetic just because.
 

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You are probably fine if you go by the service recommendations. I changed all my gear fluids just because I could. The only thing close to an issue I saw was the condition of the rear diff fluid. Maybe the casting had an unusual amount of rust or other schmutz? I don't know...
It's changed and clean now. Like I said, other posts I have seen lead me to believe my case was an anomaly.

What do you mean you suspect the rear was dirty on assembly? Dirty with what? What would make it look so nasty at 13k and not cause damage? Crap, maybe I should change mine with something synthetic just because.
 

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How often do you exercise the front differential? I would think it's condensation, every street 4X4 I have owned would show indications of moisture in the front diff. Trucks that saw a lot of 4X4 did not have the problem. It takes a lot of driving with the front diff engaged to get hot enough to burn of moisture.
It takes more than just ‘condensation’ to make the oil milky. If you have milky oil and blaming it on ‘condensation’ - then you’re gonna be sorry eventually.
 

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This was a Torsen going into a carrier for a '99~'04 Mustang Cobra IRS pumpkin. I set the pinion and ring preload by feel. It took a few pinion reinstalls but the accel and decel wear patterns checked out perfect with Prussian blue. The IRS assembly was transplanted into a formerly solid axle '96 Mustang Cobra. The car ran much quieter than OEM with no driveline clunk. In the end the car still drove like crap because of the late 80's Fairmont front end. That 3 degree caster was never intended for wide performance rubber. I briefly thought about an aftermarket front subframe and A-arms, then went to my friendly BMW dealer and ordered an '05 M3. I enjoyed that for 11 years but eventually sold it and bought the Collie as life's interests tend to change.

My first car was a '65 MG Midget that I bought for $625 with 110k miles. It forced me to become a reasonable mechanic. My choice any given day was to forge new ground mechanically or to learn appreciation for my current location. I sold the little beast for 4x what I had paid 13 years later with 225k miles.
The Diesel Collie gets better mileage. Ha!

Did this wander off-topic? Hmmm...

Chuck_B
Loved it

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 
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