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Discussion Starter #1
Found a perfect first aid kit to fit in the truck. Was one of the last pieces to complete my preparedness gear. Wasn't sure if anyone else was in the market but I found this to be compact yet carry all the necessities. Was able to squeeze my magnesium fire starter in it too. Fits perfectly in the center consol. Anyone else carrying first aid kits? And what are y'all carrying for preparedness/recovery gear? Pics!
 

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Always make sure you have a decent quality multitool. I prefer Gerber brands. Also at least 1 led flashlight.

And....thats a pretty neat little first aid kit. Might have to jump on that one myself.:wink2:
 

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I picked that kit up as well. And if that's the smittybilt strap, I have that same one too.

I assembled this kit for my Crosstrek, but all those tools and gear are now in my bed toolbox.

I really like having all the necessitys with me.

Folding shovel
First aid kit
Socket set
Channel locks
Zip ties
Electrical tape
Tire plugs
Super glue
Air compressor
Recovery strap
Assortment of bungees and ratchets
Shackles
Jumper cables
Razor

I'm sure I'm missing a few things but I always find things to add to it from my other toolboxes.

 

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Don't forget toilet paper, hand wipes and few feminine products for the ladies. A tick remover is a great idea as well. Several sizes of zip lock bags are nice to have around.

I picked that kit up as well. And if that's the smittybilt strap, I have that same one too.

I assembled this kit for my Crosstrek, but all those tools and gear are now in my bed toolbox.

I really like having all the necessitys with me.

Folding shovel
First aid kit
Socket set
Channel locks
Zip ties
Electrical tape
Tire plugs
Super glue
Air compressor
Recovery strap
Assortment of bungees and ratchets
Shackles
Jumper cables
Razor

I'm sure I'm missing a few things but I always find things to add to it from my other toolboxes.

 

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Don't forget toilet paper, hand wipes and few feminine products for the ladies. A tick remover is a great idea as well. Several sizes of zip lock bags are nice to have around.


I got microfiber towels and glass cleaner!

Some Ziploc bags would be a good addition tho. Dont have a lot of ticks locally to worry a lot about. But a good thought
 

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Nice! And Thank You..... @ThumperHDCMC Thankyou for the link.

I think this would be a great First Aid kit for the boat. I kinda cobbled first aid supplies (20 year old supplies) into an organizer bin. This will be 'smaller' to save space.

Is there room in the bag (or pockets) to add other things? I'll probably carry along tick tool, sting stick, hook removal thing-a-ma-bob....etc LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nice! And Thank You..... @ThumperHDCMC Thankyou for the link.

I think this would be a great First Aid kit for the boat. I kinda cobbled first aid supplies (20 year old supplies) into an organizer bin. This will be 'smaller' to save space.

Is there room in the bag (or pockets) to add other things? I'll probably carry along tick tool, sting stick, hook removal thing-a-ma-bob....etc LOL
There are pockets in it but it's packed pretty tight. I was able to squeeze a magnesium fire starter in the bag. There's also an outside pocket on the front. Tick tool would probably fit. Sting stick maybe. I'd probably go a tad bigger bag on a boat. I like this one because you can grab and go. Easy to carry on a hike for example. Plus it fits like a glove in our center console
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Always make sure you have a decent quality multitool. I prefer Gerber brands. Also at least 1 led flashlight.

And....thats a pretty neat little first aid kit. Might have to jump on that one myself.
Of all my flash lights (kind of a fetish lol) I've never tossed one in my truck. Have about 6 in my work van lol. Gonna do that immediately!
 

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I bought a kit via https://www.restockyourkit.com, the guy who runs the site teaches a variety of first aid courses in the D.C. area and really knows his stuff. He sells items at essentially cost to ensure that people are getting high quality materials. Most of the stuff you get in the pre-made kits at places like WalMart is junk. I purchased a stater first aid kit from him and keep it under my back seat.
 

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What you carry in the kit depends on your training and where you travel. If you don't spend much time in the woods, a tick remover would be pretty useless. If you spend a lot of time on the highway, a strap cutter and a window punch is a good idea. I also like to carry combat dressings, a Rhino-rocket, and a tourniquet. For back woods travel I carry wound irrigator, a skin stapler, and Dermabond. Vacuum pack zip-lock bags are a great way to package some of that stuff for long term storage. I put it all in a small military surplus canvas tool kit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Had my wife look at the contents and she approved. She's the RN after all ;) this covers the basics. Some specialty stuff could definitely be added. But I imagine this would cover majority of what your average person would run into on a day to day basis.
 

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Toss in a few elastic wraps, like you might use for a sprained ankle. This was the top recommendation from an intensive Remote Area Trauma Course (7 days, classroom and hands on scenarios) the elastic wraps have many uses.

Add a hacksaw to your always carry tool kit.
For offroading, water purifying tablets, fire starting tools (as mentioned above), space blanket, etc.

One of the RATC scenarios was a car crash, we had old cars to practice on, pull the rubber seal from front windshield, it'll come right out. About a minute to hacksaw through the A pillars, then you can peel the roof up for personnel extraction.
Hopefully not a scenario anyone will encounter.
 

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Just a note; the best first aid kit in the world can be useless if you don't know how to use it. A St. John first aid course is well worth the investment; many companies will pay for their employees to take these courses. I carry my little St John first aid book in my truck to remind me. What's the difference between compression and concussion? I always forget; just an example and I've done this course - need a refresher!

Here's a link to one of my YouTube subs that discusses this topic:

Anyhow, it's always good to know how to handle the basics; cuts, scrapes, contusions and other bashes; big difference between reading about it and doing this stuff in person. When traveling with a group, it's good to identify who is the most experienced when it comes to first aid.
 
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I went off roading with a couple of friends a few weeks ago. Unfortunately we weren't driving a chevy, so we got stranded when my friends Jeep broke down. That was the day I remembered just how important it is to have a kit packed with some safety essentials and supplies. We were stranded in the desert for a few hours before we could get helped. It wasn't all that nerve wracking, but it reminded me to make sure I have a safety kit stored at all times in case anything goes wrong.
 

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I use Adventure Medical Kits exclusively for backpacking with the addition of a quik clot bandage. Same kit drops in the saddle bag of the motorcycle, molle bag, or under the Colorado seat.

https://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/
For you and anyone else with blood management such as Quik Clot or Celox, remember that these are EMERGENCY use only: when well-aimed direct pressure is failing to stop bleeding.

The blood thinners they put you on after a dose of QC or Celox is nasty stuff; literally rat poison, in one case. Don't put you or a loved one through that if you can help it.

That's my Alaska SAR pet peeve with the laissez-faire way blood management is just thrown out there with no regard for consequence.
 

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For you and anyone else with blood management such as Quik Clot or Celox, remember that these are EMERGENCY use only: when well-aimed direct pressure is failing to stop bleeding.

The blood thinners they put you on after a dose of QC or Celox is nasty stuff; literally rat poison, in one case. Don't put you or a loved one through that if you can help it.

That's my Alaska SAR pet peeve with the laissez-faire way blood management is just thrown out there with no regard for consequence.
Agree, people forget the basics like direct pressure. Worse part of these products is post trauma wound cleanup especially if you use the granule based clotters. But if I'm in the back country and my sanitary pads are saturated and pressure isn't working, at least I have it.
 
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