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There's also the other factor of them getting to keep your money longer, particularly if it's still in the factory warranty period.
Plus extended warranty starts when you purchase it, not when your stock warranty ends (at least that's how the GMEPP warranty was explained to me). I just hit 35k so I'll be purchasing an additional 48k mileage warranty, probably from www.knappvehicleservicecontracts.com unless there are better places to pick it up from.
 

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Update from the dealer: The good news is that the warranty will cover this (I have been understandably worried about this for obvious reasons) Bad news is that I need a new engine. The #3 cylinder seems to have thrown a valve and that's why it locked up. The dealer says "they" have not seen or heard of a similar failure in this engine. That means I'm rare and special, right?
No reason it shouldn't be covered as it was a mechanical failure. Glad they aren't fighting you over it.
Dropped valve......ooff.
Common occurrence for the older 2.8L used in the Jeep Liberty from 2005-06 and this engine is based off that.
It does sound like a one off failure as I haven't read about a lot of valve failures and hopefully GM changed the metallurgy vs the old VMI 2.8L engine.
Still surprised no warning lights went off when the motor popped. You'd think with all the sensors on these trucks, one of them would know when the motor throws a valve.
I wouldn't expect any sensor to go off for a dropped valve that locks the engine up.
Tear done found the crankshaft was broke in two.
Happens more than you might think. The crank will break but the main journals keep it trapped. They run, loudly. Seen broken cranks in 2.8/3.1 V6, 6.2/6.5 diesel, even 6.6L duramax.
 

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Discussion Starter #123
OK, the service writer called and said the new engine is installed and running fine. They're waiting on an exhaust gas temp sensor which should arrive tomorrow. No charge, and a brand new baby Duramax for me to break in with care. Speaking of which, I will obviously be easy on the new motor until it's broken in. Any tips besides following what GM says to do/not do? What about colder temps (I'm in Illinois) I'll change the new oil fairly soon, say 500 miles or so. Welcome any advise from folks who know. Let's hope this motor lasts a while 😁
 

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Congrats! I'd probably go a bit longer before the first oil change--at least 2,000 miles, but that's just me.

Not sure what your temps are in IL, or what already gets added to the fuel by the stations, but you might need a fuel additive for the cold weather if you don't keep it garaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #125
Congrats! I'd probably go a bit longer before the first oil change--at least 2,000 miles, but that's just me.

Not sure what your temps are in IL, or what already gets added to the fuel by the stations, but you might need a fuel additive for the cold weather if you don't keep it garaged.
It's babied in a garage and Illinois winters are not nearly as cold as they once were.
 

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I'm a fan of the 500 mile break in change personally. Don't hold any RPM, keep it under 55, take it easy, no towing or hauling. Some of that is more for the diff, but might as well. It's just one tank of fuel. Check your oil level for consumption until it is fully broken in (this is beyond the first 500 miles). There's a 10K mile strategy that involves adding ballast to the bed in increments up to payload max up to 10K miles, then removing it all when you're done. I've never done that before, but trying it out with mine.
 

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15 hours at max torque very speed don’t idle much then weight the bitch down and get motor going heat seals the rings. Don’t baby after the 15 hours it’s a diesel truck motor
 

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The diesel itself shouldn't be babied during break in, drive it normally with some aggressive acceleration here and there. The 500 mile break in in the manual is for the rear differential, not the engine. Diesel engines like to be worked during break in, so if you have a trailer then I'd hitch it up after about 100 miles on the new engine and give it a good workout. Glad to hear things worked out!

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It's babied in a garage and Illinois winters are not nearly as cold as they once were.
You don't need any winter additives. The fuel in your area already contains a winter blend. Modern diesels are not like the ones of the past. Fuel jelling (the problem encountered in winter climates) doesn't become an issue until you are well below zero.

There was a time when I wouldn't put more than 500 miles on a new engine before changing the oil. That was due to manufacturing processes at the time and wear created by the new components. Manufacturing processes have advanced greatly since then as have materials and I no longer do the break in oil change. You can't go wrong by following the manufacturer's recommendations in the owner's manual. Remember, no one who says you can do different from those instructions will be around to help you should something go awry, so take what they say with many grains of salt.
 

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You don't need any winter additives. The fuel in your area already contains a winter blend. Modern diesels are not like the ones of the past. Fuel jelling (the problem encountered in winter climates) doesn't become an issue until you are well below zero.
It actually depends on who supplies the fuel and how they winterize the fuel. Here in illinois it's not uncommon for fuel to be treated based on predicted temps and if those temps drop suddenly then you're in trouble. Happened to me a couple of winters ago, lows got down to -10F and highs not even above 0F in January and my truck was parked outside at the airport. Fuel gelled.

Parked in a garage, though, is no problem. The problem comes when parked outside and the temps stay lower than the fuel has been treated down to for long enough. When in doubt, carry a bottle of Power Service Diesel 911.

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It actually depends on who supplies the fuel and how they winterize the fuel. Here in illinois it's not uncommon for fuel to be treated based on predicted temps and if those temps drop suddenly then you're in trouble.
I would imagine it could also be more of a problem with Covid. The fuel someone is using now could have been bought back in August! I haven't calculated our mileage reduction percentage yet, but my SIL was at about 25% of normal. We have three vehicles and one I've always made a point of driving at least 20 miles at least once a week. Now I think about that for all three.
 

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I would imagine it could also be more of a problem with Covid. The fuel someone is using now could have been bought back in August! I haven't calculated our mileage reduction percentage yet, but my SIL was at about 25% of normal. We have three vehicles and one I've always made a point of driving at least 20 miles at least once a week. Now I think about that for all three.
Yup, that happens as well. Or people filling in a warmer climate and driving north and having untreated fuel sitting in their tank.

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The 500 mile break in in the manual is for the rear differential, not the engine.
I disagree with a lot of what you said, but this especially. The part that's for the diff is the 55+ speeds. The transmission gearing reduces output such that the engine doesn't know or care about anything other than speed and load. The diff knows about absolute speed. High speeds in the diff combined with unbroken in gear faces results in high heat that doesn't get an opportunity to be quenched in the oil prior to being fully work hardened. It's best to let it break itself in the way its intended before really giving it a hard time. Not holding any particular RPM for any length of time prevents the rings finding themselves in a stable oscillation frequency and staying loose. Loose rings can cause all sorts of damage, mostly resulting in loss of compression and or increased oil consumption for the life of the engine (the quality of the last 100K miles are dictated by the care taken in the first 1K). In the OP's break in scenario, it's likely worth adhering to this solitary exception because any speeds 55+ are almost certainly to be done on the highway, which is long term steady state by design, and exactly the sort of conditions that discourage ring setting. As for loading it up, probably not a good idea until the rings are set for a lot of the same reasons. Once the rings are seated and happy, go nuts loading it up and working it hard.
 

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@spectre6000 you're welcome to disagree, doesn't change facts. Diesel engines break in better when they're worked, not when they're babied. Also doesn't change that the 500 mile break in, speed limit, and towing restriction is for the rear differential and not the engine.

Babying the new engine is not how it should be broken in.



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It’s a diesel not a car. Read any diesel break in procedure. Work it. 70/80 max torque vary speed. Heat is how the ring seat get the oil out of the way and ring seat otherwise glaze the walls and takes forever for rings to break in
 

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These engines are mostly broken in during the hot test after assembly. There was a video on you tube which showed this at the factory in Malaysia. These are not rebuilt or built engines from your local shop which leaves the break-in process to you.

Contrary to the others on here, Don’t abuse or beat on a new vehicle. Doing so can cause hotspots and cause excess wear on new parts that haven’t been broken in. Drive it conservatively for the 1st 1000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #139
These engines are mostly broken in during the hot test after assembly. There was a video on you tube which showed this at the factory in Malaysia. These are not rebuilt or built engines from your local shop which leaves the break-in process to you.

Contrary to the others on here, Don’t abuse or beat on a new vehicle. Doing so can cause hotspots and cause excess wear on new parts that haven’t been broken in. Drive it conservatively for the 1st 1000 miles.
Thanks. I truly appreciate all the responses to my OP. The goal of the post was two fold: Share my story and see if this was a common issue. I fully expected to get the full range of opinions/experiences/advise that we have seen. Again, thanks to all who contributed.

As a person who has A: Never owned a diesel prior to this Canyon. B: Have not owned a GM product for over 20 years. C: New to towing, I chose the Duramax Canyon because it checked most of the boxes in what I wanted in a tow vehicle. I am going forward with the attitude that this is a first world problem that could have been much worse. Not gonna hate on GM, diesel, or motors made overseas.

I will break in the motor as GM recommends and go forward enjoying this beautiful looking and driving midsize truck and embrace my blessings. Thanks!
 

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These engines are mostly broken in during the hot test after assembly. There was a video on you tube which showed this at the factory in Malaysia. These are not rebuilt or built engines from your local shop which leaves the break-in process to you.

Contrary to the others on here, Don’t abuse or beat on a new vehicle. Doing so can cause hotspots and cause excess wear on new parts that haven’t been broken in. Drive it conservatively for the 1st 1000 miles.
One of the better posts in this thread - other than the OP reporting he was getting his truck fixed at no cost. 😀
 
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