Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this months Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I ticked off 148k on the colorado this weekend and am beginning to plan for the 150k maintenance/timing belt replacement. Has anyone DIY'd this job? From what I can gather it is not rocket science, it just requires some time, patience and perhaps a few bloodied knuckles.

I plan to do some cleanup and flushing work while I have it down.

Any tips or suggestions appreciated. Planned work is as follows:

Remove clean and and flush radiator and intercooler
Remove/replace serpentine belt
Remove replace timing belt
change XFER case fluid
change front/rear differential fluid
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,994 Posts
Post pics, I am curious to see how your belt looks at 150K. Good luck!

Lots of videos on YouTube for CRD Jeeps, those should be reasonably relevant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I was just looking through my owners manual and saw this on the service intervals , actually surprised about the 150,000 mile interval , pretty substantial distance for a belt (IMOP) . Keep us posted on this and investment .
 

·
Registered
‘17 Colorado CCLB 2wd 2.8L Duramax Summit White
Joined
·
146 Posts
You might find this useful-

Also Sasquatchparts.com sells the complete kit for a timing belt change and rents all of the special tools required to do the job.

Out of curiosity, is your truck stock or tuned?
 

·
Registered
2021 Colorado 2.8L Diesel Z71
Joined
·
330 Posts
I think the GM LWN timing belt design is different from the CRD timing belt design. I'm not 100% on this, but I believe the belt drove both cams on the CRD. There is a single cam pulley on the LWN, and then a gear to the second cam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Please do post pictures if you do it yourself! I've changed 5 or 6 T belts over the years, some motors took longer than others but none have been "difficult" yet, if you have the right tools. I'm really curious to know how this one is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,906 Posts
I think the GM LWN timing belt design is different from the CRD timing belt design. I'm not 100% on this, but I believe the belt drove both cams on the CRD. There is a single cam pulley on the LWN, and then a gear to the second cam.
The Jeep used the R428 and the LWN is based on the A428. The R428 and A428 are quite a bit different.

Here's an idea of what people will be digging into to do the timing belt.

409070
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for feedback and links. Good to know there are a few specialty tools I will likely need and can rent. Looks like the kit is out of stock from sasquatch.

My truck is bone stock. No tune, no deletes, stock tires, stock exhaust, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
In regards to kits; I personally would use an OEM kit for sure, but not an aftermarket kit. The OEM parts are known good quality, the aftermarket is typically trying to hit a price point that is lower than OEM which does not typically lead to better quality than OEM. With something as critical as a timing belt, it's not worth saving a few bucks, to me anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
id recommend trying to get your hands on the downloadable service manual (~14,000 pages) for the twins on ebay. i think i paid $20 for my copy. feeling like a broken record, but a lot of the dtc questions that pop up on here are easily answered in there as well. useful info!

anyway, itll have all the various torque specs and gotchas... at least until someone bothers to go through and document it on here.
i wouldnt mark-and-pray a diesel belt, get the locking tools. the mark and swap method isnt too bad on gas stuff if youre familiar with the setup and the marks to re-verify. not enough clearance on diesels to be worth the risk to me though... at least on all the vw tdis ive done even being familiar with them id always set to tdc, lock them, then replace.

doesnt look like anything too exotic going on here though.
gotta take some stuff off the front of the motor, pull the accessory belt and all its pullies, the tensioner, etc
then remove the whole cover, lock the crank and cam, pull the belt and the tensioner.
realign and check the cam, crank, and fuel pump marks, reinstall....

id probably replace the waterpump

id post the whole thing but its a number of pages, jumping around from component to component.

409074


409076


409075
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,906 Posts
I believe someone posted up that having the dealer do the timing belt and water pump was in the neighborhood of $800 out the door. For me, based on the time, tools, and patience involved that seems like a bargain and the dealer will be doing my timing belt. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Does anyone know if the GM belts have timing marks printed on them? I changed the belt in my old truck 3x (due to mileage) and by the 3rd time Toyota had added white marks to the belt that made lining up the timing pretty much idiot proof. Match the marks on the belt to the marks on the sprockets and presto it's right, no getting 1-tooth off and having to start over.

I still haven't found a dealer I trust enough to do the belt for me.
 

·
Registered
‘17 Colorado CCLB 2wd 2.8L Duramax Summit White
Joined
·
146 Posts
I still haven't found a dealer I trust enough to do the belt for me.
Haha I was about to say the same thing. Lots people on this forum don’t even trust the dealer enough to do an oil change
 

·
Premium Member
2018 ZR2 Duramax
Joined
·
126 Posts
Does anyone know if the GM belts have timing marks printed on them? I changed the belt in my old truck 3x (due to mileage) and by the 3rd time Toyota had added white marks to the belt that made lining up the timing pretty much idiot proof. Match the marks on the belt to the marks on the sprockets and presto it's right, no getting 1-tooth off and having to start over.

I still haven't found a dealer I trust enough to do the belt for me.
No there is no timing marks on a replacement belt. As long as you get the cam lockdown tool it’s pretty hard to mess the timing up considering there is a mark on the crank and a mark on the fuel pump pulley to line up with the timing cover marks.

but also just a mention to OP, theres a seal you’ll have to cut and pry out to install the cam lock down tool. They’ve been on national back order for the last month and I’m still waiting so you might want to hold off till you have a new plug before you start this job lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
More LWN pics.
20210426_214010.jpg
20180120_130019.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Why doesn't my motor look that shiny? :)


I accidentally replied in the linked thread, stupid me...

So here it is agian....
Keep the info coming! Like others mentioned, I am not sure I trust the local dealers have done enough of these to know what they are doing any more than I would. Diesel colorados and canyons are about as rare around these parts as featherless chickens and of those, very few have reached 150k. Our local bow tie dealers service dept is still trying to figure out which transmission fluid Colorados take so I am not eager to drop it off and be a guinea pig although $850.00 does sound like a fair price.

The pics and description from the service manual are great. Thank you!

I found this video on a RG colorado timing belt change.

If I am not mistaken, its the same motor? Looks like the only special tools they used were a great big pry bar, a deadblow hammer, and a large trash can. Calling around today to see if I can find a large trash can. :) Kidding aside, they didn't remove the plug and lock the cam. They just marked all the pulley's and belt and then turned it over by hand to verify no interference. Seems a little risky. Can't say I would use the same method but it certainly gives us a good look at what is required for access and how it comes apart and goes back together which doesn't look terrible. Just time consuming.

I think my biggest fear right now is getting all the parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,068 Posts
Please do post pictures if you do it yourself! I've changed 5 or 6 T belts over the years, some motors took longer than others but none have been "difficult" yet, if you have the right tools. I'm really curious to know how this one is.
The last one I changed was on a 1993 Mazda MPV Van with the V6 engine. Was not bad at all, but having the Service Manual was a huge +! I was able to fabricate a special tool that I would need before the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Haha I was about to say the same thing. Lots people on this forum don’t even trust the dealer enough to do an oil change
I still haven't found a dealer I trust enough to do the belt for me.
I don't understand those comments. I can understand being timid and getting a new person with an oil change and forgetting something as that is usually the first "mechanic" work someone does, but anyone doing anything more complex especially internal engine is going to be much more highly trained and done the procedure numerous times, and at a dealer they will be ASE certified. They will complete it better, faster and be much more qualified than probably 98% of the people in here as opposed to those trying it first time.

I would most certainly trust a dealer do the work I don't want to do and they are more knowledgeable and capable than myself. I usually do my own once I am out of warranty because I enjoy the challenge, have the knowledge and like to save money. It certainly isn't because they aren't as capable as I am as I know they are more capable (that is their job, just like they aren't nearly as capable as someone who say works in Finance).

Also most comments such as those regarding the incompetence at a dealer is word of mouth or a bad oil change/tire rotation service, not at all indictive of their capability at much more complex tasks with their trained techs and all the correct specialized tools. Just like anything you are going to hear on a forum more negative than positive information, but there are far more positive interactions out there than negative ones, you just don't hear about them. Plus, they are human, they can have a screw up, at a dealer at least their work is covered and warrantied if there is a screw up, if you do it then it is on you...

Tyler
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top