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Discussion Starter #1
I've been training adults and teenagers for 20+ years on how to drive all sizes and types of fire trucks and 4 wheel drive brush trucks. I've never had one of my trainees get into an accident with a piece of equipment.
We hired a new guy, mid 20's, smart as hell EMT working his first ambulance job. He side swiped a gas pump on day one and before he gets fired, I convinced the bosses to partner him up with me for driver training. Went to the fire house and got my traffic cones and set him up a small, basic course last night. TOTAL FAILURE! Tonight I set up a simple parking space, 10ft x 20ft and a 10 ft wide curved driveway. Again, TOTAL FAILURE! He cannot back into a parking space, much less back down a standard residential driveway! I've asked the boss to bring him back next week for a last chance session. I've had Jr. Firefighters back a 5k gallon tanker into tight parking spaces and run obstacle courses before they had driver's licenses and I can't teach this guy to back or even drive straight into a parking space in a Ford Transit! I've put it on paper and had him video me driving every exercise that I've asked him to do and study the videos. Extra Large mirrors and backup cameras and he can't get it. Not sure how he even got a driver's license? If he doesn't get it quick, he's gonna be unemployed and unemployable as an EMT. I hate to see anyone fail. I also realize that some people are not teachable. I just can't believe that out of the hundreds of kids that I've taught to drive that this one is going to beat me! Not sure where to turn to help this guy succeed short of losing my temper and going off on him to see if that will sink in.

Anyone else teach driver training?
Any last ditch ideas?
 

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For him it's not muscle memory. It's just like typing. Anyone can learn to touch type.

But I myself do not touch type. At least not using the traditional home row style. Instead I use the self taught strategy which is a bit more random, floaty, and matches typing on a phone better.



The key difference is the touch typing system is very explicitly taught. Someone has to tell you how to touch type. If you become naturally good like me without learning how to touch type then you will use the self taught strategy or at least something like it.

Meanwhile people can type for 20 years using a silly 2 finger style and never graduate to the better self taught strategy. This is just like your mid 20s driver who can't back into a parking space.

It doesn't make him stupid or dumb. It's just how the human mind works really. So he needs to be more active and thoughtful about his driving until he builds that muscle memory. It is going to take a while. Weeks. Months maybe. He needs lots of low pressure practice until that behavior is drilled into his mind that he doesn't have to think about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I definitely agree. Unfortunately, he went to school for a few months to learn a 1/3 of a skill. The other 2/3 of being an EMT is getting the patient to a hospital alive. We work in rural EMS where we sometimes have to back down a narrow 1/4 Mile drive or turn around in a drive that is only as wide as a full size car and then drive anywhere from 35 - 75 miles to an appropriate hospital, some of which we have to back uphill into the er bay. At this point he can't back into a parking space at Wal-Mart without taking out the vehicles on either side of him. I'm seeing a short lived career. In some places, there are EMTs working in er's or quick care facilities, but no where within 200 miles of here. I'm not giving up on him, but I can't say the same for the company. I failed to mention that our particular ambulance is a standard Ford Transit low top Van. Our Colorado/Canyons are nearly the same length and width. It's currently the smallest ambulance type in the U.S. God forbid he have to drive one of our old Mobile Intensive Care Units.

As far as typing, I used to type 30-40 words a minute self taught. Then I took a typing class......screwed me up big time and I never could pass a typing test in class! Lol
 

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I definitely agree. Unfortunately, he went to school for a few months to learn a 1/3 of a skill. The other 2/3 of being an EMT is getting the patient to a hospital alive. We work in rural EMS where we sometimes have to back down a narrow 1/4 Mile drive or turn around in a drive that is only as wide as a full size car and then drive anywhere from 35 - 75 miles to an appropriate hospital, some of which we have to back uphill into the er bay. At this point he can't back into a parking space at Wal-Mart without taking out the vehicles on either side of him. I'm seeing a short lived career. In some places, there are EMTs working in er's or quick care facilities, but no where within 200 miles of here. I'm not giving up on him, but I can't say the same for the company. I failed to mention that our particular ambulance is a standard Ford Transit low top Van. Our Colorado/Canyons are nearly the same length and width. It's currently the smallest ambulance type in the U.S. God forbid he have to drive one of our old Mobile Intensive Care Units.

As far as typing, I used to type 30-40 words a minute self taught. Then I took a typing class......screwed me up big time and I never could pass a typing test in class! Lol
I tried to learn the old type writer style and it messed me up for a while as well but that was years ago.

If he has a computer something like Euro Truck Simulator and an Xbox controller can go a long way. Yes it’s a game but from what I’m hearing he is just fine at driving and just needs some better sensory response.
 

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Maybe the guy has a depth perception issue or is somewhat visually dyslectic so eye/brain doesn't work in reverse for him? Sad that would prevent him from the job.
It would just be another example of how not everyone is suited for just any job.
 

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Can he be a EMT/Paramedic with out being a driver?

All my friends are EMT, Parametic's or Fire Fighters and only my cousin is a driver.

some people can back a boat up, some cannot
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Can he be a EMT/Paramedic with out being a driver?

All my friends are EMT, Parametic's or Fire Fighters and only my cousin is a driver.

some people can back a boat up, some cannot
Another two years in school can put him in a Paramedic spot. Doesn't guarantee that he won't wind up on a double paramedic truck rotating driver duties or even having to rotate driving duties on long trips. We make 14 - 16 hour turn arounds allot and one person usually can't drive that long without a break. Maybe if he went to a FD he could shrug the driving duties for a couple of years.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe the guy has a depth perception issue or is somewhat visually dyslectic so eye/brain doesn't work in reverse for him? Sad that would prevent him from the job.
It would just be another example of how not everyone is suited for just any job.
I'm seriously wondering about the depth perception. I'm not a doctor and not sure how to go about determining if he is or if it's only in certain situations. I can draw him a line and he can't follow it or ask him to stop at a certain point and he'll either stop 50 ft short or blow across it by 50 ft too far. Ask the guy a medical question and he'll quote the book word for word. He's smart as hell! He just can't drive from point a to b.
 

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Maybe make it less visual. If 3D acuity is lacking, make him time out loud how long it takes to roll at speed into a speed bump, time how long it takes to turn by counting seconds, to clear a given obstacle and see if that can improve him somewhat. Sounds like it would be a loss to the medical field if driving was the only disqualifying factor.
 

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I tried teaching my 16 year old daughter to drive a standard shift on my old Honda Civic. After traveling less than two miles from the house and stalling the car a dozen times lesson was over.

After the final jerking back and forth and stall l knew we were done. My daughter, that I love dearly, tossed the keys into my lap. She opened the door and got out. Looked at me and yelled, “YOU CANT TEACH ANYONE ANYTHING!” She then slammed the door and walked home.

My first and last time giving anyone a driving lesson.

Gusto!
 

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Based on the depth perception issue and can't hit a line, I have to ask whether or he has had a recent and thorough eye exam? I realize your new person is a lot younger, but the condition sounds similar what I recently went through.

Here's my situation, I've had reading glass since I was about 40, no big deal lots of people have them and I get get regular eye exams. Then a couple of years ago I started having problems with depth perception and it was really bad in the evenings/nights if a car came up behind me with their lights on. During my last exam, it was noted that I needed glasses for distance, again to problem.

Once I got the glasses, I started seeing a shadow image, not what I would call double vision, but a strong shadow. In the evenings it was really bad and I couldn't tell which line in the road was real and which was the shadow - on day 3 the glasses came off and I went for a recheck being sure the prescription was wrong. After a recheck, I have one eye that is ever so slightly turned in, so I have a prism in the right lens with a degree of 10. The shadows are gone, no problems at night or in bright lights or any other time and my depth perception is spot on.

The doc asked if the everything was clear when I closed one eye and the answer was yes. I realized that I would often close one eye when I was trying to hit something spot or see an exact measurement on a rule or tape measure. I'd close the eye without even thinking about it and now I know it doesn't happen anymore.

The eye doc and internet references showed that it can happen over time and the brain compensates to a point or it becomes apparent when there is a change. In my case the change was getting the distance glasses and now I realize that I had the problem for a long time and can see so much clearer now. I was always between the lines, but was I right at the end of the parking space or 3 foot the end, it was inconsistent.
 

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I tried teaching my 16 year old daughter to drive a standard shift on my old Honda Civic. After traveling less than two miles from the house and stalling the car a dozen times lesson was over.

After the final jerking back and forth and stall l knew we were done. My daughter, that I love dearly, tossed the keys into my lap. She opened the door and got out. Looked at me and yelled, “YOU CANT TEACH ANYONE ANYTHING!” She then slammed the door and walked home.

My first and last time giving anyone a driving lesson.

Gusto!
Now that you bring up the teaching the daughter how to drive a standard, it makes me think I need to do the same with my 33 year old daughter who will inherit my 2002 Trans Am 6 speed one day. I worked with her a few years back on my 93 Geo Storm, but it did not have killer power. She did pretty good, but we never got passed parking lot driver training. I cannot bail out like you, I have to bite the bullet and do it, soon.
 
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