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5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SPARK PLUGS

1. Anti-seize
NGK spark plugs feature trivalent plating. This silver or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without lubrication or anti-seize.
Anti-seize can act as a lubricant, altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage and/or metal shell stretch. Thread breakage can sometimes involve removing the cylinder head for repair. Metal shell stretch changes the heat rating of the spark plug and can result in serious engine damage caused by pre-ignition. Do not use anti-seize or lubricant on NGK spark plugs. It is completely unnecessary and can be detrimental.

This is on NGK, Not AC Delco. Auto Parts: GM OE (Professional) Iridium Spark Plugs | ACDelco
No where does GM say do or don't.
I'm from the old school days. Aluminum Head needs just a tickle of the gray stuff.
Actually GM does chime in on this. In the Helms service manual on spark plug replacement, it specifically refers to the section on "Component Fastener Tightening Caution" which reads in part: "Components requiring the use of thread locking compound, lubricants, corrosion inhibitors, or sealants are identified in the service procedure." The service procedure for replacing spark plugs does not specify the use of corrosion inhibitors (anti seize), therefore by not specifying it's usage, GM is in effect saying "Don't use it".

Having said that, I still use it, sparingly on any spark plug I install, adjusting torque value accordingly.
 

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2017 AT 4x4 LWN CCLB Dark Slate Metallic
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my experience on plugs isn't over use of anti-sieze, but the engine TEMPERATURE at which they are changed. Yes you can put cold plugs in a hot engine and it will run. But when those plugs need to come out, the damage is done and youre screwed. Unless there is a crush washer involved, torque is rarely an issue.
On these trucks, Im seeing a torque valve of 13 lbs ft. By comparison, the oil filter cap is 16 lbs ft which is hand tight. What this tells me is I don't need anti-sieze, I need a drop of thread lock at the top just to keep any rotation at bay. And even if it did rotate, the plug is held down captive.
If you let the engine cool down completely and install the plugs at the same temperature, and don't wrench on them, no other thread coatings are necessary.

Two things destroy plug threads:
overtightening
cold plugs in hot heads
Ding ding we have a winner. Temperature differential and the presence of anti-seize (lubricant) are both factors that will change the specified torque of pretty much any fastener. Engineers specify the torque under certain conditions, so if the instructions don't call for anti-seize and someone applies it and uses the torque specified without using anti-seize...then they did it wrong. Likewise, there's likely going to be a step in the instructions to wait a certain amount of time if the engine is hot.
 

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Wow, is the changing spark plugs really rocket science now or what!?
:ROFLMAO:🐐
Aluminum does expand more with heat than cast iron or steel. Maybe not rocket science but it's nowhere near the same as the old days where iron heads, 15K change intervals on copper tipped plugs, and auto classes being taught in high school were all common. So yeah maybe not a big deal since plugs now get changed every 100K, assuming the engine even lasts long enough for another cycle...
 

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Aluminum does expand more with heat than cast iron or steel. Maybe not rocket science but it's nowhere near the same as the old days where iron heads, 15K change intervals on copper tipped plugs, and auto classes being taught in high school were all common. So yeah maybe not a big deal since plugs now get changed every 100K, assuming the engine even lasts long enough for another cycle...
ya, I just like to let the engine cool off then do it.
And yes, it's not a big deal at all unless you are the type that strips stuff out! lol If that is the case then maybe pay someone to do it for you or at least get help.
 

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I've been a LS guy for 20 years, and have not typically used anti-seize. Honestly my long time approach was putting a little oil on the threads.
Agreed, it makes me feel better when the plug (or anything really) goes in lubed.
Pun not intended. lol
You know what I mean you sickos.

I even put a tiny bit of oil on lug stud threads (gasp!) that liked to rust stuck all the time before. Saves you from needing new studs. This can happen to people who wash their car a lot.
 

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2018 Colorado CCLB Z71 3.6 LGZ
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That's the perfect place for antiseize

Lugnuts.
I hope you're joking about that.
Lug nuts and studs never get anything.
They are always dry. Use a wire brush to clean any rust or dirt.
 

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I hope you're joking about that.
Lug nuts and studs never get anything.
They are always dry. Use a wire brush to clean any rust or dirt.
NOPE. And it's never been a problem.

In today's world with caps. Not needed. Yesterday's world without caps. They'd rust on and break the studs trying to get em off. Probably why they started adding caps.

For those of us who take our tires off occasionally. It's no big deal.
Most however. Never touch their tires.


Some semi companies would use it. When I started driving 20 years ago.. Don't see it used these days.

And you only use a very light brushing at the rim. Not heavily coat the entire stud.

We have caps so not needed.
 

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NOPE. And it's never been a problem.

In today's world with caps. Not needed. Yesterday's world without caps. They'd rust on and break the studs trying to get em off. Probably why they started adding caps.

For those of us who take our tires off occasionally. It's no big deal.
Most however. Never touch their tires.


Some semi companies would use it. When I started driving 20 years ago.. Don't see it used these days.

And you only use a very light brushing at the rim. Not heavily coat the entire stud.

We have caps so not needed.
Beg to differ that it's never been a problem, and this might be why.
 

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I had an aluminum wheel on my Ram 2500 stick so tight on the rear hub that I could not break it loose with a hammer. End up having to leave the lug nuts slightly loose and take it a short drive down the street to break it free. I use anti sieze on all wheels now, in the hub bore.
 

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hub bore and wheel face are the only points Id agree with as long as the agent doesn't creep out to the stud threads or brake surfaces. That would be over use if it did.

As for my argument, If a wheel is taken off during the normal life of a road tire, say within 150K miles, or two years, rust SHOULDN'T have an opportunity to create a seizure of the lug nuts.
I am only referring to passenger vehicles. OTR tractors and equipment may have different needs. But if someone's lug nuts have rusted on, it's most likely a negligence issue or a vehicle has sat outside for an extended period, which is negligence also.
No passenger vehicles should ever get lubrication or anti-seize on the wheel studs.
To do so is unnecessary, results in false torque values, and is a safety violation.

The only reason Im being a [email protected] about it is because this is public domain, anyone can read it, follow it, incorrectly perhaps, and get hurt. I don't like hurt.
 

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Beg to differ that it's never been a problem, and this might be why.
Tires weren't flying away in the 20th century.

I've seen lotsa in the 21st century. And I doubt they had antiseize.

So beg to differ.



A big rubber hammer on the tire always brakes the rim off a tight hub.

Say what you about 20th century wrenching.
We weren't making things complicated that you all make today.
 

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Do you think that wheel came off because of anti-seize on the lug nuts?
Not sure but it is entirely possible. I have seen it happen myself, lug nuts sheared clean off. That typically only happens when the lug nuts are either loose or over-tightened, both of which could be caused by a mechanic or the use of anti-seize.

Tires weren't flying away in the 20th century.

I've seen lotsa in the 21st century. And I doubt they had antiseize.

A big rubber hammer on the tire always brakes the rim off a tight hub.
We also didn't have the widespread use of dash cams to capture them flying away in the 20th century because the required camera and recording equipment would have taken up a whole seat or more...
 

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Not sure but it is entirely possible. I have seen it happen myself, lug nuts sheared clean off. That typically only happens when the lug nuts are either loose or over-tightened, both of which could be caused by a mechanic or the use of anti-seize.


We also didn't have the widespread use of dash cams to capture them flying away in the 20th century because the required camera and recording equipment would have taken up a whole seat or more...
No..but you do have eyes that see your surroundings. And I certainly see a lot of vehicles without rims on the freeway these days. I also see broken suspension.
 

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Do you think that wheel came off because of anti-seize on the lug nuts?
Dude. You have no idea why that tire came off.

The most like reason would be the tire was never torqued. There's also the possibility that rim was a junk rim that shouldn't have been used. As in elongated holes.

You can't blame it on anti-seize. Cuz you just don't know what happened
 

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No..but you do have eyes that see your surroundings. And I certainly see a lot of vehicles without rims on the freeway these days. I also see broken suspension.
Actually, yes wheels were flying away frequently in the 20th century...

"The Institute of Road Transport Engineers and the Department of Transport had been carrying out considerable re search into the problem since 1982. That research indicated that a failure rate of 2-3%, which was alarmingly high when there was no explanation."
 
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