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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There are two things a man does not divulge:
Were he buried the body, and what makes his chili totally awesome.
The two should not be related, but chili lore and technique, is often clouded in mystery.
A man must EARN his chili. It can't come from a Betty Crocker cookbook or a packet.
Its fought for. It takes years and more than a few cans of beer. Its a right of passage.
Its something entrusted to you by the most special BFF. Sometimes its pure luck.
But however you found it, yours is the perfect pot of chili and you're awefully proud of it.
People can try to make your recipe, but they can never make your chili.
Probably because you didn't tell them about the special secret ingredient. No self respecting chili cook does.
That special magic morsel was too hard and rare to come by. Men and ladies, have spent years pursuing it.
Mostly the men because we usually don't have a clue what were doing anyway.
But that is exactly what I'm asking for now, your magic ingredint or touch.
If you don't have a really good reason to keep that locked up, please share it.
Baby, its cold outside. Time for chili.
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I'll start.
If you grind your own powder, try a mix of Ancho, Morita, Chipotle (de-seeded) and a few chiltepines or pequines.
Roast and toast just about everything, especially the cumin.
Brown meats in bacon rendering, if your faith allows it. Not olive oil, that's such a fad. Burns easily. Canola or Safflower oils are heat tolerant.
Try some smoked paprika or liquid smoke.
Sear meats with lots of grill marks.
Keep tomato juice to minimum and add a little vinegar to cut the acid.
Don't burn it, keep a plate between the pot and flame.
Black beans on the side.
If cooking with sausage or fatty meats, spoon off floating fat and grease as much as possible before adding vegetables or thickeners. We need to be alive for the next chili.
Sauté vegetables first but add to pot late and don't boil them. Preserve flavor and texture.
SALT!
The best advice I ever got:
"If you know what you're doing, they don't know what they're eating"
 

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I'll bite. I grew up in Texas, and my dad used to routinely enter and win chili contests. That said, my chili tastes do not necessarily comport with that convention...

I use pork instead of beef. Beans are a must. I like a little sweet corn. Tomato is an ingredient, but not primary. Chilis should be the #1 ingredient, and by a fair margin. I use chipotles for flavor and heat, and had been using hatches for body/flavor until I started seeing pueblos. Pueblo peppers are hatches with thicker and more flavorful flesh; the best parts of the hatch peppers, but more of it. Get them fire roasted when you can. Slow cooked for a long time the pork breaks down in a way beef doesn't, and thus falls into line in a supporting role to chilies.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have LOTS of chili books and a collection of recipes, most of them useless.
Reading Robb Walsh's book now. If you want a decent chili book, get it.
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Discussion Starter #8

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Discussion Starter #9
What kind of voodoo is this.
Black beans, if you haven't noticed, are unbelievably delicious. The last thing I would want to do to a perfectly good black bean is put it in anything that is not as delicious. But, if the chili is really dark, woody and smokey, the two will complement each other very well.
But of course, you are right. In most cases, if there is room for beans, there isn't enough meat.
But a chili that had had the meat fished out can be extended further with some choice beans.

C'mon chili-heads, chime in!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Basic can't loose (no heat) chili:

1 lb coarse grind, browned, drained. My favorite is char grilled burger patties, broken up.
Sautee:
1 med onion, yellow or white, chopped,
3 cove garlic, roasted or toasted, small dice
1 Tbs butter or bacon grease or light cooking oil
Return meats to sauté and add:
1/2 12oz can Mexican beer (drink the rest)
1/2 15oz can diced tomatoes, drained (this is not tomato soup)
2 Tbs dark chili powder
2 tsp ground cumin (ground toasted seed is best)
1/2 tsp Mexican oregano (yes, Mexican)
1/2 tsp salt (or more)
1/2 tsp black pepper (probably more)
1 tsp liquid smoke or smoked paprika (yes, I know it cheating)
1/8 tsp or few drops of vinegar (to neutralize acid)
cover with water, add water as necessary.
simmer 30 min uncovered or until flavors are blended
Use an additional pan between the heat and the pot to prevent hot spot burning.

If you can take the added flavor, add an additional Tbs of chili powder just before serving.

If a thickener is desired, a Tbs of corn flour or masa harina or break up corn chips or crackers.
No, chili doesn't have to be a paste.

If more color or texture is desired I suggest adding chopped yellow, red and yellow bell pepper to the sautée, boiled hominy, and cubed grilled chicken and peppered beef sausage.
And of course, almost any chili is great over spaghetti or other pasta and or your favorite beans.

As for the heat, gawd, there are so many ways to do that. I would have a bag of ground red chile and flavor to taste starting with 1/2 tsp. Try ground moritas (dried smoked ripe red jalapeños) or chipotle powder (dried smoked green jalapeños)
 

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A really good grated sharp cheddar cheese and chopped onions on top. Now I'm hungry again.
 

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Basic can't loose (no heat) chili:

1 lb coarse grind, browned, drained. My favorite is char grilled burger patties, broken up.
Sautee:
1 med onion, yellow or white, chopped,
3 cove garlic, roasted or toasted, small dice
1 Tbs butter or bacon grease or light cooking oil
Return meats to sauté and add:
1/2 12oz can Mexican beer (drink the rest)
1/2 15oz can diced tomatoes, drained (this is not tomato soup)
2 Tbs dark chili powder
2 tsp ground cumin (ground toasted seed is best)
1/2 tsp Mexican oregano (yes, Mexican)
1/2 tsp salt (or more)
1/2 tsp black pepper (probably more)
1 tsp liquid smoke or smoked paprika (yes, I know it cheating)
1/8 tsp or few drops of vinegar (to neutralize acid)
cover with water, add water as necessary.
simmer 30 min uncovered or until flavors are blended
Use an additional pan between the heat and the pot to prevent hot spot burning.

If you can take the added flavor, add an additional Tbs of chili powder just before serving.

If a thickener is desired, a Tbs of corn flour or masa harina or break up corn chips or crackers.
No, chili doesn't have to be a paste.

If more color or texture is desired I suggest adding chopped yellow, red and yellow bell pepper to the sautée, boiled hominy, and cubed grilled chicken and peppered beef sausage.
And of course, almost any chili is great over spaghetti or other pasta and or your favorite beans.

As for the heat, gawd, there are so many ways to do that. I would have a bag of ground red chile and flavor to taste starting with 1/2 tsp. Try ground moritas (dried smoked ripe red jalapeños) or chipotle powder (dried smoked green jalapeños)
Good point, leftover hamburgers would make excellent chili.
 

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There are two things a man does not divulge:
Were he buried the body, and what makes his chili totally awesome.........
l
True Story:
About 7 or 8 years ago I called my best friend and high school buddy of 50 years. I said I need to ask you a very serious question. I must have either a YES or NO answer. I won’t answer any more questions from you until I get my yes or no. He protested at first. I said, look I’ll answer all your questions after I get your yes or no answer. Reluctantly he agreed and said what’s your question.

In a very calm and almost quiet voice I said, “Will you help me bury a body?” I waited in silence for about 20 - 30 seconds before I heard him say, “Yes”

But right after he said, “For the love of God tell me you didn’t just kill someone!”

I responded, “No but everyone needs a best friend to help bury a body if it became necessary. I’m glad I can count on you. You truly are my best friend.” Afterwards he had a big sigh and called me a bunch of vulgar names. We both had a great laugh.

Now as far as the Chili. I’m not giving anything away. Unless it’s to my best friend.

Gusto!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
True Story:
About 7 or 8 years ago I called my best friend and high school buddy of 50 years. I said I need to ask you a very serious question. I must have either a YES or NO answer. I won’t answer any more questions from you until I get my yes or no. He protested at first. I said, look I’ll answer all your questions after I get your yes or no answer. Reluctantly he agreed and said what’s your question.

In a very calm and almost quiet voice I said, “Will you help me bury a body?” I waited in silence for about 20 - 30 seconds before I heard him say, “Yes”

But right after he said, “For the love of God tell me you didn’t just kill someone!”

I responded, “No but everyone needs a best friend to help bury a body if it became necessary. I’m glad I can count on you. You truly are my best friend.” Afterwards he had a big sigh and called me a bunch of vulgar names. We both had a great laugh.

Now as far as the Chili. I’m not giving anything away. Unless it’s to my best friend.

Gusto!
OK nice story. I would have said no cause a friend wouldn't ask his friend to be an accomplice or accessory to anything that bad, unless its was an animal.
But thanks for contributing SOMETHING.
How about ONE thing for chili!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I don't cook. However on the other side of the coin, none of my bodies will ever be discovered.
If you can open a can, turn on an oven and use a measuring spoon (but not necessary) you can throw together something you can call chili.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I encourage everyone to make chili from scratch, but not many have the patience for that. The next best thing is a pre-fab flavor and spice pack. The one I like the best (so far and Ive tried most of them except Carroll Shelbys) is the sauce pack from Stubbs. The reason I like Stubbs is that it tastes like chili should and it has the vinegar it needs.
I have not yet tried any canned chili that tastes like it should. Wolf Brand is probably the best flavor, but too greasy.
 

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If you can open a can, turn on an oven and use a measuring spoon (but not necessary) you can throw together something you can call chili.
I didn't say I couldn't cook, I said I don't cook. There are some tasks in life that hold zero interest for me. I'd much rather turn wrenches or bend wire than play with pots and pans. :p
 
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