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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Does anyone know if the LGZ engine comes with special Factory break in oil? I know several of my Hondas came with special break in oil from the factory that contains a metric crapton of molybdenum, more than any off the shelf oil I've seen. The manual on those cars specifically says not to change the oil early for its first oil change. Is there anything similar with our truck motors?
 

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No the cars and truck do not have anything special in them. Most are run a the factory when the engine are built and the tolerances are such there is little to any break in with the vehicles.

The two most critical components are the rings and the cams. Cams are no longer in play as roller can and rockers do not need to break in. The rings still do but they are set to seat with normal oil and normal varied driving.


To be honest most vehicles early mile directions are not followed and few failures happen as they have tried to make the break in fool proof.


But never say never as some engines do still have some special things like your Honda and the Hell Cat that the computer releases more power and boost as the engine get more miles. Things are a little more critical and less margin of error is involved.


As for our trucks just vary the speed early and change the oil when it states. Don't over think this as most companies know how people are and pretty much take as much risk out as possible.


Now if you are rebuilding a engine with a flat tappet cam you have to use a special oil additive as it no longer holds the phosphates and zink that enhance the cam break in.
It will wipe a cam not to use the additive in these cases today but most of these are much older engines.
 

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I plan on changing mine at 500 miles. I understand that the probability of having a failure if I do not do so is small, but I see it as cheap insurance.
That is a complete waste of money. If your engine was going to have issues it wouldn't have passed quality for one, and if it passed and is going to fail later an oil change at 500 miles accomplishes nothing but emptying your wallet.

To answer OP question...Don't believe the engine comes with anything but factory fill which should be Mobil 1 5W30 and AC Delco filter. I'd recommend using those two throughout the life of your engine for longest lifespan as well as following the DIC calculator.
 

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I actually think that it may be a type of "break-in" oil. I changed mine at 2,500 miles for the first time. It was not very dirty, but I was going on a long trip and wanted clean oil in it. When I drained it, it had a curious somewhat red color. . (hope they did not mistake at the plant and put in tranny fluid!) And. . no . . . I did not drain the tranny fluid by mistake.

Anyway, besides that, while working in a full size SUV plant (Suburban, Tahoe, Yokon, etc) in 2007, there definitely was Sonoco provided oil which was higher in zinc formulation to aid any scuffing while the engine is wearing in.

Which brings up another matter. There is "break in" and then "wear in". Break in was always talked about to be the first 1,500 to 3,000 miles depending on what car years you want to talk about. "Wear in", is the term used for the complete drive train condition of parts having honed themselves together. This included engine parts, transmission gears, bearings, etc. This is real and generally occurs at 10,000 to 15,000 miles. At that point, a vehicle will usually attain optimum gas mileage since parts are more perfectly meshed. Many people do notice increased MPG starting even around 5K miles, but more so at 10k to 15K miles.
It does seem to make sense. After all, there certainly is more wear on a drive train at 150,00 or 200,00 miles and things are loosened up. So why wouldn't it also be the case after parts "wear in" after 10K to 15K miles?

If you don't buy this, that is ok. Only reporting what a few design engineers mention as well as experience.

Disclaimer . .. not here to dispute or argue about this.

Take however many grains of salt that you wish.. . :grin2:
 
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The initial 500-mile break-in period these days is almost entirely for the rear differential to work harden/burnish and the low (55mph or less) speed is to prevent the diff from overheating during this period as that could cause the R&P to weaken or become somewhat brittle. This is also why most truck owner's manuals say not to tow within the first 500 miles, too.

Changing the oil early, either after break-in or in general, has actually been shown to increase engine wear. Crazy as that sounds, it makes sense when you understand how the oil additive packs work.

Fresh oil has, among other things, detergents and anti-wear additives. The detergents go to work immediately and are consumed within 1500-2000 miles, during this time the detergents actually clean off the high-pressure film created by the anti-wear additives (zinc, moly, etc) and without this film there is a spike in wear metal per mile. Once the detergents are used up, the anti-wear additives go back to work creating the high-pressure film that helps protect against metal-on-metal contact and wear so the wear metal count in the oil starts to level off to normal levels where they stay until the oil has reached the end of its useful life (As determined by used oil analysis).

This oil lifecycle was proven by taking oil samples roughly every 1,500-2,000 miles over the course of 15,000 miles to establish a wear pattern over the life of the oil and not just to determine the state of the oil when it's changed. This means the people that still follow the 3,000 mile interval from decades gone by are actually doing more harm than good to their engine compared to the folks that wait until they reach the mileage interval determined by the manufacturer (Or time-based if they don't drive much, but this is more about combating acids, condensation, and fuel dilution caused by short drives than anything).

So, personally, I change the oil when the computer tells me to (or by time, if I don't reach the mileage interval first).
 
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That is a complete waste of money. If your engine was going to have issues it wouldn't have passed quality for one, and if it passed and is going to fail later an oil change at 500 miles accomplishes nothing but emptying your wallet.

To answer OP question...Don't believe the engine comes with anything but factory fill which should be Mobil 1 5W30 and AC Delco filter. I'd recommend using those two throughout the life of your engine for longest lifespan as well as following the DIC calculator.
This is very true. Many people just fon’t Keep current and things have been changing fast even if it looks the same.

I have everything on Mobil One. It is cheap, easy to find and hits all the makes for what is required.

At work I get so many old school guys with wiped cams not understanding the changes.

They call up claiming a cam had a soft lobe. Will the came is treated at the same time and the lobes are all the same. They either did not use a break in additive or they have a geometry issue or bad lifter bore.

Using Rotella T no longer works for break in.

We have good oil today and can only imagine how much better if the EPA-had not got involved.
 

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I actually think that it may be a type of "break-in" oil. I changed mine at 2,500 miles for the first time. It was not very dirty, but I was going on a long trip and wanted clean oil in it. When I drained it, it had a curious somewhat red color. . (hope they did not mistake at the plant and put in tranny fluid!) And. . no . . . I did not drain the tranny fluid by mistake.

Anyway, besides that, while working in a full size SUV plant (Suburban, Tahoe, Yokon, etc) in 2007, there definitely was Sonoco provided oil which was higher in zinc formulation to aid any scuffing while the engine is wearing in.

Which brings up another matter. There is "break in" and then "wear in". Break in was always talked about to be the first 1,500 to 3,000 miles depending on what car years you want to talk about. "Wear in", is the term used for the complete drive train condition of parts having honed themselves together. This included engine parts, transmission gears, bearings, etc. This is real and generally occurs at 10,000 to 15,000 miles. At that point, a vehicle will usually attain optimum gas mileage since parts are more perfectly meshed. Many people do notice increased MPG starting even around 5K miles, but more so at 10k to 15K miles.
It does seem to make sense. After all, there certainly is more wear on a drive train at 150,00 or 200,00 miles and things are loosened up. So why wouldn't it also be the case after parts "wear in" after 10K to 15K miles?

If you don't buy this, that is ok. Only reporting what a few design engineers mention as well as experience.

Disclaimer . .. not here to dispute or argue about this.

Take however many grains of salt that you wish.. . :grin2:


That is interesting on the Sunoco fill, however, a LOT has changed since 07. Not saying you are wrong because I haven’t been at final assembly, but judging by what I know and have seen I stand by my original recommendation. Unfortunately I can’t go into any more detail as this is a public forum.

Also it is worth noting that Tahoe/suburban engines do not use the same engines our trucks do. They are very much completely different; wouldn’t be fair to compare them in the slightest amount.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Yes, agree and to be honest, which is why I used terms like "I think, may be . . and "my experience" , but no one, so far, has produced any evidence whether or not our very different engines do not have a factory fill of oil with break in additives.
It does often seem some like to repeatedly make definitive statements in forums claiming special inside current info without any real substantiation. That's forums for you. You never know what your gonna get . . .lol.

What is current is that unless one gets to Wentzville, examines the oil supply, brand and product number, looks up the specs, etc. . . . all speculation on everyone's part. I think I will be sending in my first oil change sample for UOA and compare to my next oil change and see if there are higher amounts of zinc or molybdenum which are anti scuff additives.

Maybe that RichZ71 fella who has a Wentzville connection could find out. . . .
 

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To be fair over the years many things have been used ad tried so there were never any full absolutes.

Over priced he years engine were like people all a little different.

Engine are less so today but occasionsally there were different needs.

In the era Blu speaks piston slap was an issue in trucks and suv models they may have tried to fix it with a special oil? Had to say.
 

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hyperv6, I think your spell check is failing you.......
 

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Yes, agree and to be honest, which is why I used terms like "I think, may be . . and "my experience" , but no one, so far, has produced any evidence whether or not our very different engines do not have a factory fill of oil with break in additives.
It does often seem some like to repeatedly make definitive statements in forums claiming special inside current info without any real substantiation. That's forums for you. You never know what your gonna get . . .lol.

What is current is that unless one gets to Wentzville, examines the oil supply, brand and product number, looks up the specs, etc. . . . all speculation on everyone's part. I think I will be sending in my first oil change sample for UOA and compare to my next oil change and see if there are higher amounts of zinc or molybdenum which are anti scuff additives.

Maybe that RichZ71 fella who has a Wentzville connection could find out. . . .
Without going into much detail, I can assure you that no break in oil is used to my knowledge. Factory fill only (refer to 1st post) is all I've seen from brand new to fully worn in engines. Never come across any oiling issues with that combination in my experience. But you bring a valid point that without physically being there you have no way to fully know. If you post your osa I can look it over, and can probably confirm/deny my suspicions. I would compare it directly with data sheet from Mobil 1 5W30 dexos 1 gen 2 variant.
 

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This subject has always intrigued me. I don't change my oil early, I typically change the oil/filter @ 5000 mi intervals with no mechanical issues.

I don't think there is anything special about the initial oil put in at the factory. But, what I wonder about is the assembly lube they use when building the engines. Possibly it contains zinc, moly compounds which would be dispersed in the engine oil and circulated throughout. That would be another vote not do that first oil change early.
 

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hyperv6, I think your spell check is failing you.......
Part spell check part big fingers and part Apple update, part I did not proof read and just don’t care.

The latest up date wants to put numbers in the post as they are duel keys now.

My typing was not great and it just makes it more challenging.

I was not made for these times.

I learned to type on a Royal mechanical typewriter.
 

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I have the 2.5 liter 4 cylinder engine I have a little over 3000 miles on my truck and the oil seems really dark for that few of miles on a new motor. Oil is black dic shows 48% oil life I’m gonna have it changed towards the end of November so I’ll prolly be in the high 20% to low 30% when I get it changed and should have around 4000 miles on it. I’m doing it then because it will be easier for me to get to the dealership.
 

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I have the 2.5 liter 4 cylinder engine I have a little over 3000 miles on my truck and the oil seems really dark for that few of miles on a new motor. Oil is black dic shows 48% oil life I’m gonna have it changed towards the end of November so I’ll prolly be in the high 20% to low 30% when I get it changed and should have around 4000 miles on it. I’m doing it then because it will be easier for me to get to the dealership.
Oil color is not an indication of oil quality or life, so don't rely on your eyes to tell you when the oil should be changed. If it were then we'd be changing oil in the diesels every 500 miles.
 

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The initial 500-mile break-in period these days is almost entirely for the rear differential to work harden/burnish and the low (55mph or less) speed is to prevent the diff from overheating during this period as that could cause the R&P to weaken or become somewhat brittle. This is also why most truck owner's manuals say not to tow within the first 500 miles, too.

Changing the oil early, either after break-in or in general, has actually been shown to increase engine wear. Crazy as that sounds, it makes sense when you understand how the oil additive packs work.

Fresh oil has, among other things, detergents and anti-wear additives. The detergents go to work immediately and are consumed within 1500-2000 miles, during this time the detergents actually clean off the high-pressure film created by the anti-wear additives (zinc, moly, etc) and without this film there is a spike in wear metal per mile. Once the detergents are used up, the anti-wear additives go back to work creating the high-pressure film that helps protect against metal-on-metal contact and wear so the wear metal count in the oil starts to level off to normal levels where they stay until the oil has reached the end of its useful life (As determined by used oil analysis).

This oil lifecycle was proven by taking oil samples roughly every 1,500-2,000 miles over the course of 15,000 miles to establish a wear pattern over the life of the oil and not just to determine the state of the oil when it's changed. This means the people that still follow the 3,000 mile interval from decades gone by are actually doing more harm than good to their engine compared to the folks that wait until they reach the mileage interval determined by the manufacturer (Or time-based if they don't drive much, but this is more about combating acids, condensation, and fuel dilution caused by short drives than anything).

So, personally, I change the oil when the computer tells me to (or by time, if I don't reach the mileage interval first).
Source of your copy/paste???
 

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Oil color is not an indication of oil quality or life, so don't rely on your eyes to tell you when the oil should be changed. If it were then we'd be changing oil in the diesels every 500 miles.
I know that I don’t have a diesel mine is gas but I know color isn’t I was just saying it seems darker then I would of expected. Maybe because it’s a direct injected motor idk. Thank you for your info.
 

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