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I'll defend the "horrible idea" comment. Sag is a measure of spring stiffness only. Some vehicles sag quite a bit under weight, others very little. We currently own a VW Jetta station wagon with a load capacity of 1014#. The vehicle sags noticeably under such a load, but has handled that much weight over tens of thousands of miles of sometime very rough road without complaint. Our E-350 is very stiffly sprung and sag is almost non-existent at its 2000# capacity, but run it over a scale and you'll see that it is at its max rear axle rating (6084#). Having driven by a similar E-350 on the side of the road last month with what looked like two blown rear tires and not a lot of spring sag, it brings home the point that you are exposing yourself to a lot of liability if you use this method of judging payload.

My suggestion is to load the bed with a known weight (i.e. roofing shingle bundles or bags of concrete), measure the sag at GVWR, and then use this sag in future load determinations to see how close you are to GVWR. Of course running over a scale is the preferred method. And keep the tires at their maximum permissible inflation rating when running heavy.
 

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Just doing truck thangs today and testing the payload limits with our new "hardwood" floors:



The Canyon handled it like a champ even if we might have been a little over capacity with both of us and some light luggage in the car :oops:
 
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Payload. From the GMC brochure, this is in kilograms, I don't have time to convert to pounds.

2WD/4WD

Extended cab 4cyl 676/667
Extended cab V6 735/721
Crew cab SB 4cyl 676/ ----
Crew cab SB V6 735/703
Crew cab SB Diesel 683/667
Crew cab LB V6 712/667
Crew cab LB Diesel 673/644
 

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Just doing truck thangs today and testing the payload limits with our new "hardwood" floors:



The Canyon handled it like a champ even if we might have been a little over capacity with both of us and some light luggage in the car :oops:
is that the entire 2000lbs? Looks good to me! I was going to suggest it was ok as long as you are not doing it everyday. By ok, I mean the TRUCK, not the drive...YRMV
edit - oops. not the OP. Anyway, how heavy if that?
 

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is that the entire 2000lbs? Looks good to me! I was going to suggest it was ok as long as you are not doing it everyday. By ok, I mean the TRUCK, not the drive...YRMV
edit - oops. not the OP. Anyway, how heavy if that?
Yep I just bumped an old thread so I didn't create a new one :)

I think the guy told me it was 1400 lbs, he was Russian and spoke broken English. He said that an old Ford Ranger handles that kind of load fine so I should be good...haha

We were definitely over the limit with my wife and I in there but I took the surface roads back home under 50mph for about 15 miles. I figured if this truck couldn't handle getting that thrown at it I need to turn the keys back in and get something bigger.
 

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Old thread but I wanted to update it after I found it via search.

I hauled 2,060 lbs in my bed with my 2017 CC LB for around 50 miles this afternoon. It was a lot of weight but stock truck dealt with it. I didn't take any pictures of the squat as it was dark but it was definitely squatting a bit.
 

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Old thread but I wanted to update it after I found it via search.

I hauled 2,060 lbs in my bed with my 2017 CC LB for around 50 miles this afternoon. It was a lot of weight but stock truck dealt with it. I didn't take any pictures of the squat as it was dark but it was definitely squatting a bit.
Just because you can doesn't mean you should. I used to see this a lot when I was towing a 5th wheel. Guys would overload 3/4 ton trucks with trailers that should have been on bigger trucks. Yeah, the trucks did the job but they were overloaded and thus not safe.
 

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As I carry a 1100 lb pop up camper and all the gear and beer... I am around 1600 lb. That said I moved up to E rated tires (10 ply) this adds safety (actually keep it at 50 psi all around.....as you know E is inflatable to 80psi) . I also added a leaf pack (overload removed) made by Boise Spring Works). Handles the weight perfectly.
I would also highly recommend Firestone Ride Rite air bags. They are incredible for handling improvement with weight....levels the load side to side if needed as well. Easy to install. ( I also had Air Lifts ..... for the Colorado they are terrible... I went through 3 bag bursts and went back to Firestone... much better quality IMO
 

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Just because you can doesn't mean you should. I used to see this a lot when I was towing a 5th wheel. Guys would overload 3/4 ton trucks with trailers that should have been on bigger trucks. Yeah, the trucks did the job but they were overloaded and thus not safe.
I hear ya, didn't have much control about how much was going in there from a bucket loader, looked like around a 1/4 bucket full. Once I realized when they weighed it the actual weight I was like SH*T but drove it home slow as not much other choice.
 

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I hear ya, didn't have much control about how much was going in there from a bucket loader, looked like around a 1/4 bucket full. Once I realized when they weighed it the actual weight I was like SH*T but drove it home slow as not much other choice.
Ha ha - yeah I've seen bucket loaders blow out rear tires before. Oops! :surprise:
 

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Light duty trucks including Silverado and Sierras don’t carry much weight, put 2200# in my 2016 Silverado once and it was very sketchy. I’m currently shopping for a trailer with at least a 3000k cargo capacity.


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Bumping a thread to tell my story. Got a load of vinyl flooring from a local store and planned on taking two trips since it was going to be about 2 pallets worth. Driver took forever getting my order, and when he came out with the pallet, it looked like someone had unpacked it then saran wrapped it all back together. 68 boxes total. When I asked if he knew about how much it all weighed, he pointed to a customs label on the side that stated ~1,540#. (later found out that a 48-box pallet was 1,640# so the 68-box frankenpallet was actually closer to 2,325#)

2,325# in a 2016 Colorado diesel short bed.

This guy loaded it up and took off and I was left scratching my head. Thinking that it was maybe around 1,700#, I took off on the 20-mile trip back home - taking care to avoid any large bumps and speeds above 50mph. Every dip sent the truck bucking and I thought I was going to fold the truck in half. The one significant bump I hit got my ass bouncing, and I could see the frame flex in my rearview which scared she shite outta me, but the bed-cab gap was still even when I pulled over so I kept going.

By some stroke of heavenly luck, (and a considerable amount of of over-enginnering on chevy's part apparently) I made it back without killing anyone and/or folding my frame into a taco. I would never knowingly load my truck up like that again, and now I stay awake at night wondering if I've done irreparable damage to my truck. Moral of the story -know your load's weight before you load it, and trust in your intuition when it seems overloaded.
 
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