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In keeping with the past GMC trend, the Canyon looks like a Sierra that was left in the dryer and it shrank. The Colorado had more of it's own sport truck vibe, but the '23 Colorado looks more like the FS version too. I do like that the Colorado's front end shows a modicum of restraint, looking less styled after the Star Wars storm trooper helmets. Styles and trends change, apparently "thick" is in. I rather like trim, svelte and athletic myself. I am always behind the times :LOL:
 

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I think you might be getting hung up on semantics here. As a long time engineer I had no problem understanding what he said. The term "engineering" can be used in many different ways such as a verb to describe a design process. In that respect his statements were plenty clear.
Six of one . .. . . .
As a long time engineering technician in several GM plants the company and departments liked to be pretty specific about what engineering area was specific in a function.
The point was engineering is/was involved.
 

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Six of one . .. . . .
As a long time engineering technician in several GM plants the company and departments liked to be pretty specific about what engineering area was specific in a function.
The point was engineering is/was involved.
I'm fairly confident everyone already knew that engineering was involved. If you can't see the different uses, maybe Webster can help you understand.
Engineering Definition & Meaning - Merriam-Webster
 

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2021 GMC Canyon 3.6L V6 crew cab, short bed
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but most people that buy the ATX4 do not need a dance floor on the bed of their truck :)

I have 2 brother in-laws that were engineers, retired now, they talk just like these guys do, in circles forever :ROFLMAO:
Yep I agree most off-road truckers don't want a dance floor covering their truck beds but, in this case, they did put a tonneau cover on it so why go with the cheapest looking cover on a $60K midsized truck and not a more price comparable cover, (starting at over $1K for a metal sliding tonneau cover) for a, (maybe over $60K for a 4-cylinder midsized) truck ATX4 was my point
 

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Yeah I would just think that on an ATX4, (what about $60K midsized truck) they would have at least thrown the hard tri-folding tonneau cover on or maybe the metal sliding tonneau cover? You know because it fits the price range of the truck more. But guess not.
The AT4X price also includes the much improved G93, G94 electronic selectable front and real locking differentials. The AT4X is the only trim to get these. AT4X is also the only trim with baja mode.
 

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Yep I agree most off-road truckers don't want a dance floor covering their truck beds but, in this case, they did put a tonneau cover on it so why go with the cheapest looking cover on a $60K midsized truck and not a more price comparable cover, (starting at over $1K for a metal sliding tonneau cover) for a, (maybe over $60K for a 4-cylinder midsized) truck ATX4 was my point
Because this truck most likely will be crushed. Also it may have just been tossed on to cover the luggage for one trip.

It’s not like this truck is a personally owned vehicle.
 

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When I ordered my '14 Corvette I learned quite a bit about the design/engineering/plant start-up process for an all-new model. The engineering mules are those covered in camo, and are often built from one-off prototype parts. Alpha mules are usually those with the heavy padded camo, and may be quite rough, subject to styling changes. Beta mules are with the camo tape wrap, and are generally set in overall design. This allows for quick design changes as initial real-world testing begins and flaws are found. The mule fleet is usually a handful at alpha level to perhaps a couple dozen vehicles at beta. Betas might also be built on the assembly line.

Next will usually be a pilot run, also called the captured test fleet. These are more or less production-ready builds, assembled on the line to test any new tooling, verify the overall process, etc. The vehicles are driven extensively in the real world to identify any minor little glitches in vehicle design and assembly. For the C7 Corvette, GM wanted 1,000,000 total miles on the captured test fleet. The cars were driven by engineers, designers and regular assembly plant staff all over the country, with feedback collected and analyzed by the vehicle line engineers.

This data is used for fine-tuning everything computer controlled, from throttle response to how quickly heated seats warm up. At this point all the hard-component design is already locked in, unless some highly-unusual condition points to a component flaw. Rare but it does happen, and usually why a new vehicle's production may be delayed.

The captured test fleet can be several dozen to over 100 vehicles, depending on the make & model. The mule fleet will usually be crushed, as many aren't even 100% complete vehicles, though for the Corvette at least, 1 or 2 may survive and be displayed at the Nation Corvette Museum. The captured test fleet are generally saleable vehicles - for the C7 they were held by GM until after C7 regular production began, then sold at auction. I suspect the Colorado/Canyon will follow a similar track.
 

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When I ordered my '14 Corvette I learned quite a bit about the design/engineering/plant start-up process for an all-new model. The engineering mules are those covered in camo, and are often built from one-off prototype parts. Alpha mules are usually those with the heavy padded camo, and may be quite rough, subject to styling changes. Beta mules are with the camo tape wrap, and are generally set in overall design. This allows for quick design changes as initial real-world testing begins and flaws are found. The mule fleet is usually a handful at alpha level to perhaps a couple dozen vehicles at beta. Betas might also be built on the assembly line.

Next will usually be a pilot run, also called the captured test fleet. These are more or less production-ready builds, assembled on the line to test any new tooling, verify the overall process, etc. The vehicles are driven extensively in the real world to identify any minor little glitches in vehicle design and assembly. For the C7 Corvette, GM wanted 1,000,000 total miles on the captured test fleet. The cars were driven by engineers, designers and regular assembly plant staff all over the country, with feedback collected and analyzed by the vehicle line engineers.

This data is used for fine-tuning everything computer controlled, from throttle response to how quickly heated seats warm up. At this point all the hard-component design is already locked in, unless some highly-unusual condition points to a component flaw. Rare but it does happen, and usually why a new vehicle's production may be delayed.

The captured test fleet can be several dozen to over 100 vehicles, depending on the make & model. The mule fleet will usually be crushed, as many aren't even 100% complete vehicles, though for the Corvette at least, 1 or 2 may survive and be displayed at the Nation Corvette Museum. The captured test fleet are generally saleable vehicles - for the C7 they were held by GM until after C7 regular production began, then sold at auction. I suspect the Colorado/Canyon will follow a similar track.
Add the crash test model. Hand assembled from the parts to be used in production with the assembler verifying and signing off the torque specs used for each fastener, crash vehicles often exceed $1 million in cost - all so they can run the car into a wall and prove to the government the crash worthiness of the vehicle. Of course the manufacturer doesn't absorb the cost of this vehicle, it is reflected in the end cost of the vehicle and the fewer vehicles made of that particular vehicle (such as is the case with Corvettes) the more each individual has to pay.

Years ago, one of the assembly layout workers at Pontiac (as their classification was then titled) either forgot or simply failed to sign off on something he had installed in a build and the failure wasn't caught until after the crash test. The government wanted Pontiac to build and test another car while Pontiac argued it wouldn't have impacted (no pun intended) the results. I never heard how that worked out but Pontiac wanted to fire the worker.
 

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When I ordered my '14 Corvette I learned quite a bit about the design/engineering/plant start-up process for an all-new model. The engineering mules are those covered in camo, and are often built from one-off prototype parts. Alpha mules are usually those with the heavy padded camo, and may be quite rough, subject to styling changes. Beta mules are with the camo tape wrap, and are generally set in overall design. This allows for quick design changes as initial real-world testing begins and flaws are found. The mule fleet is usually a handful at alpha level to perhaps a couple dozen vehicles at beta. Betas might also be built on the assembly line.

Next will usually be a pilot run, also called the captured test fleet. These are more or less production-ready builds, assembled on the line to test any new tooling, verify the overall process, etc. The vehicles are driven extensively in the real world to identify any minor little glitches in vehicle design and assembly. For the C7 Corvette, GM wanted 1,000,000 total miles on the captured test fleet. The cars were driven by engineers, designers and regular assembly plant staff all over the country, with feedback collected and analyzed by the vehicle line engineers.

This data is used for fine-tuning everything computer controlled, from throttle response to how quickly heated seats warm up. At this point all the hard-component design is already locked in, unless some highly-unusual condition points to a component flaw. Rare but it does happen, and usually why a new vehicle's production may be delayed.

The captured test fleet can be several dozen to over 100 vehicles, depending on the make & model. The mule fleet will usually be crushed, as many aren't even 100% complete vehicles, though for the Corvette at least, 1 or 2 may survive and be displayed at the Nation Corvette Museum. The captured test fleet are generally saleable vehicles - for the C7 they were held by GM until after C7 regular production began, then sold at auction. I suspect the Colorado/Canyon will follow a similar track.
The one remaining 83 Corvette was saved from the crusher as it was parked at the plant where it kind of got lost? Anyways it was found and and later sent to the Museum.

Lordstown built a G5 Turbo. It was the Pontiac version of a Cobalt SS. It was a really neat car and it was to show GM the plant had all on hand to build the car. The suggestion was rejected and the car was used to run parts at the plant. It was crushed when the plant was closed.

These odd cars can turn up in many places and for many reasons. Most are crushed but a number get lost.

The best ones were the Banshee sports cars Pontiac Built in the 60's. They were ordered destroyed even though some of the styling was used on the C8 Corvette. They vanished for years and then they cleaned out a warehouse at the tech center and the designers of the cars were permitted to buy the crates in the warehouse that contained the two cars. That is how we still have the two today. One was sold when the designer passed away. The other I think is still held by the other designers family.

Some of the Fiero mules for interior show up now and then. They are 1987 Cars with a dash of the 1990. The prototypes were all crushed but the GT that is in the heritage collection. Some of the power steering mules show up and the electric power steering sells for as much as some of the cars.

I even was able to get some 1990 Fiero parts from one of the suppliers.

There are tons of variations and reasons for these cars.
 

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Yeah big wheels on off road packages are/look silly.

Tyler
I agree the 20s are a bit much for the AT4 (glad they are optional). Denali I can understand a little more, but to be honest, I am not sure why seemingly everyone seems to be so against showing some sidewall. Particularly annoying with the tall granite curbs going in urban areas and everyone basically being forced to driving around with scuffed-up rims from parallel parking (or at least from when wifey borrows your car...)
 

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Nice looking...those marker light would be getting smoked ASAP. Other then that it's sharp!
I have never understood the hate for running lights and the need to smoke them out (or smoke headlights or taillights for that matter - can't understand how that's not illegal and/or actually enforced). I'd rather light that sucker up and be as visible as possible to keep the Jerries from smashing into me.

I think the orange marker lighting on these will look sick at nighttime.
 

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I have never understood the hate for running lights and the need to smoke them out (or smoke headlights or taillights for that matter - can't understand how that's not illegal and/or actually enforced). I'd rather light that sucker up and be as visible as possible to keep the Jerries from smashing into me.

I think the orange marker lighting on these will look sick at nighttime.
I don't mind orange although the factory 2500 option is smoked with amber behind it... it also looks very nice on my truck. Guess it depends.

Smoking with VHT I feel is dumb. You never end up with the same contrast and I try to avoid any possible reasons for someone hitting and then being able to blame me....
 

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I will somewhat expect GM has had enough testing in on the tires and wheels to provide The best road and off road experience.

These are not the trucks of old that were sold with basic suspension that did not even include a front sway bar.

The 20” here are not exactly Corvette wheels and the tires still have a substantial side walls.

My truck drives and handles better than many cars in the past.

it might be interesting to see if the brakes are the same or larger.
 
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