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2021 Colorado ZR2 2.8
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 2021 ZR2 Diesel with 19,000km, Truck has not been through a regeneration since I took ownership from dealer. Got the truck it had 16km and hasn't gone through a regen... should I take it to dealership?
Had a 2019 ZR2 it had 80,000 km when I traded it in, it never went through a regeneration.
 

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I have a 2021 ZR2 Diesel with 19,000km, Truck has not been through a regeneration since I took ownership from dealer. Got the truck it had 16km and hasn't gone through a regen... should I take it to dealership?
Had a 2019 ZR2 it had 80,000 km when I traded it in, it never went through a regeneration.
What makes you say it hasn't been through a regen?
 

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There is no notification of the regen cycle unless you constantly drive such short distances that it's not able to complete. You can tell if you listen to the idle and notice your fuel economy goes down. I can also smell a faint burnt rubber smell if I park in the garage in the middle of a regen or right after once is complete.

My 2022 regens about once per tank.
 

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How far would a short trip be? I would say I travel no more than 50km a day, basically city driving stop &go
If you've driven 3,000 km and haven't gotten a warning about needing to complete a regen cycle, your regular driving habits seem like they are far enough to keep regens happening on schedule.

If I recall correctly, they take 15-20 minutes to cycle all the way through. If you stop in the middle of one, it'll pick up where it left off when you drive again.
 

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I had a 2016 I put 80k on that I never was aware it was cycling until I got my iDash just before I sold it. I now have a 22 that’s averaging a regen @ 400 miles through a mix of driving including short trips.


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Yep. GM likes to make it as seamless and non noticeable as possible to the driver. But, as mentioned above, you can notice it if you're paying attention. Slightly higher rpm's & different sound when stopped, in drive, such as at a stoplight. Burning smell occasionally. Good way to tell if while driving on highway is watch your instant fuel economy. If you normally get 30 mpg while driving 60 mph on flat highway and you look down and it says like 20 or so, then most likely in regen. If in doubt, stop the truck when it is running and get out and put your hand behind the tailpipe. It will feel like an oven. Very hot.
 

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2017 AT 4x4 LWN CCLB Dark Slate Metallic
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If interrupted, the regen does not really "pick up where it left off", it will start over and keep repeating until the ECM gets the results it is looking for. You can buy various aftermarket OBD plugin readers to see when the regen is actually happening.
 

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I just logged a regen the other day while towing my trailer. I noticed that (and I have stated this before so sorry for those who've already read it) if you dig into the go pedal too hard after a stop to get going, be it an incline you need to go up or just getting up to speed the regen can get interrupted. It usually doesn't happen unloaded but with 6K lbs of trailer it's easier to make it happen. I was on the interstate for the start of the regen and then going through hilly local roads for the rest of it.

The iDash records at 10hz, this being said each line of recorded data is 1 tenth of a second (shown in column "A") it makes for a lot of lines in a spreadsheet. I couldn't attach a XLS CFans prevented that file extension so I change the file extension to a pdf. Just download it and change it back to an XLS if you care to view it. It's a lot of lines 28K+. I highlighted in Cyan when the regen was active to make it easier to view. It really provides a ton of data for those who are data junkies such as myself.

What I recorded was 7 instances where the regen had stopped and once I was back up to whatever favorable conditions were it would restart. During this time the "distance from last regen, 715 miles" stayed at the current mileage until the last 5.8 minutes segment of regen time. Once that was finished the counter went to 0 miles "since last regen", line "19767" column "CC". In total with the interruptions the regen took 28.94 minutes. Normally it takes about 18 to 19 minutes when steady cruising and not getting interrupted. SEE column "CF" lines 19,768 thru 19,777 for details.

One thing I noted, the last column "CE" which is the "NOX Bank 1 Sensor 2" there is some erratic data in there. I'm wondering if someone else has or could record and see if they see similar data. It makes me wonder if the sensor is going south or if that's normal.
 

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Yep. GM likes to make it as seamless and non noticeable as possible to the driver. But, as mentioned above, you can notice it if you're paying attention. Slightly higher rpm's & different sound when stopped, in drive, such as at a stoplight. Burning smell occasionally. Good way to tell if while driving on highway is watch your instant fuel economy. If you normally get 30 mpg while driving 60 mph on flat highway and you look down and it says like 20 or so, then most likely in regen. If in doubt, stop the truck when it is running and get out and put your hand behind the tailpipe. It will feel like an oven. Very hot.

Mine drops to 13-15 mpg when it regenerates & truck is empty. When towing the 4000 lb camper we had, it would drop to 9 mpg during a regen.
 

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Yep. GM likes to make it as seamless and non noticeable as possible to the driver. But, as mentioned above, you can notice it if you're paying attention. Slightly higher rpm's & different sound when stopped, in drive, such as at a stoplight. Burning smell occasionally. Good way to tell if while driving on highway is watch your instant fuel economy. If you normally get 30 mpg while driving 60 mph on flat highway and you look down and it says like 20 or so, then most likely in regen. If in doubt, stop the truck when it is running and get out and put your hand behind the tailpipe. It will feel like an oven. Very hot.
just an FYI putting the truck in park kills the regen. It will restart once put back into motion.
 

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21 AT4 CCSB Desert Sand Mini Max
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Been getting familiar with my idash I installed a few days ago. Soot level first came up at 21%. A few days of in-town and highway (26 miles each way to work) miles and it would go up to 24% and drop back down to 19-22%. Excuse my ignorance but does "normal" driving burn off soot? I was under the impression that soot builds up at different rates depending on drive style, but regens don't happen until they reach a threshold of like 90%? In other words, it's constantly self-cleaning but a regen only occurs when it can't keep up and DPF resorts to a regen.
 
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Been getting familiar with my idash I installed a few days ago. Soot level first came up at 21%. A few days of in-town and highway (26 miles each way to work) miles and it would go up to 24% and drop back down to 19-22%. Excuse my ignorance but does "normal" driving burn off soot? I was under the impression that soot builds up at different rates depending on drive style, but regens don't happen until they reach a threshold of like 90%? In other words, it's constantly self-cleaning but a regen only occurs when it can't keep up and DPF resorts to a regen.
If the temps in the DPF are hot enough when highway cruising it will drop a few %. I have seen the same thing. That iDash is such a great device, for such a small package it packs a bunch of ability.
 
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