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Hi All,

I have to haul some concrete about 18 (60 lbs) bags. Total weigh will be around 1100 lbs. Can I do that or do I have to make two trips?
Thanks Hickey
 

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Hi All,

I have to haul some concrete about 18 (60 lbs) bags. Total weigh will be around 1100 lbs. Can I do that or do I have to make two trips?
Thanks Hickey
How much do you weigh? How many companions? What model? What engine?

You are probably fine, but I am the guy who carried 1600 pounds of shingles and 1200 pounds of concrete on separate trips in my 1990 GMC Safari, so I may not be a good person to ask. Hopefully this link will help.

 

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Hi All,

I have to haul some concrete about 18 (60 lbs) bags. Total weigh will be around 1100 lbs. Can I do that or do I have to make two trips?
Thanks Hickey
There's a sticker on the inside of the driver's door jamb with GCVW with load weight info. That said, I've put 1500-2000 lb pallets in the bed.
 

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There's a sticker on the inside of the driver's door jamb with GCVW with load weight info. That said, I've put 1500-2000 lb pallets in the bed.
There's actually two stickers, the one you mention and the tire pressure sticker, which gives an approximation of available payload before post-factory added accessories. Mine says 1447 pounds.
 

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There's actually two stickers, the one you mention and the tire pressure sticker, which gives an approximation of available payload before post-factory added accessories. Mine says 1447 pounds.
Really? I don't recall him asking tire psi's, so didn't direct him to that one.
 

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There's actually two stickers, the one you mention and the tire pressure sticker, which gives an approximation of available payload before post-factory added accessories. Mine says 1447 pounds.
That capacity is also before the driver is sitting in the driver's seat, so you also have to subtract your weight from the payload capacity. Not to mention the rear GAWR with 1,100LB in the bed is likely to be exceeded.
 

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Really? I don't recall him asking tire psi's, so didn't direct him to that one.
Re-read what he said. ;) The tire placard gives the payload capacity of the truck as it left the factory, includes a full tank of fuel but no occupants.
 

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Really? I don't recall him asking tire psi's, so didn't direct him to that one.
That capacity is also before the driver is sitting in the driver's seat, so you also have to subtract your weight from the payload capacity. Not to mention the rear GAWR with 1,100LB in the bed is likely to be exceeded.
Yes, the tire pressure sticker says combined weight limit of occupants and cargo. I don't know why they don't put that information on the other sticker, since it would more logically go there.

As to the rear axle capacity that very well could be a problem, at least on the crew cab short bed. There is so little space in the bed ahead of the rear axle that most the cargo weight would be on the rear axle. Anyone know what the rear is likely to weigh without cargo?
 

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That capacity is also before the driver is sitting in the driver's seat, so you also have to subtract your weight from the payload capacity. Not to mention the rear GAWR with 1,100LB in the bed is likely to be exceeded.
I may need to be educated. I am going to use round numbers to try to understand. Typical curb weight on our trucks is roughly 4400 pounds. With front engine, more of that weight is on the front axle at curb weight.

Looks like with the exception of the ZR2, the rear GAWR is 3500 pounds. Even if I take the 4400 pound curb weight and split it evenly between the two axles, that is 2200 pounds per axle, so the rear axle still has 1300 pounds of capacity.

Now, hopefully, no one loads 1100 pounds of concrete on the tailgate, they spread it out over the bed. Granted, may not be able to place it up against the cab if it is on a pallet, but a good forklift driver should be able to get it close. I know I could have when I was driving forklifts for a living.

@Goodspike makes a good point, the short bed may have less room for adjusting. Getting the load as close to the cab would shift some of the weight to the front axle.

Weight of the driver would tend to load the front axle more than the rear, rear seat passengers would impact the rear axle more.

If I was driving from my local Home Depot, less than a mile, I wouldn't blink. If I was driving 200 miles, I might consider a trailer. (Trailer easier to deal with than 2 trips of that length. )

If I was really lazy, I would just have Home Depot or whoever deliver it, and that way I only have to deal with carrying it from the pallet to the mixer I rented because mixing 18 bags of concrete in a wheel barrow with a shovel is a pain in the rear end. Having borrowed an electric mixer for roughly that number of bags of concrete, it is worth the rental.

Since I have 5 Home Depot stores that I can think of within 5 miles of my house, and at least 3, maybe 4 Lowes in same radius, I figure the trip is pretty short and I could take it easy. Some of you guys live out in the boonies.
 
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I may need to be educated.
We all might. A good front/rear weigh at a scale would be interesting. I'm not typically in the area of Cat Scales, but maybe next time I am I'll run through for kicks.

FWIW though, with about 500 pounds of tongue weight, 200 pounds of cargo, me, my wife and my cat I was within about 300 pounds of the rear axle weight towing my trailer with a WDH (and the front was also in that same range) [Edit: Also about 200 pounds of accessories.]
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry for all the confusion. I have a 2019 Colorado LT short bed 3.6 motor. From what I see 1100 lbs of concrete in bags will be fine.
Thanks All
 

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I may need to be educated. I am going to use round numbers to try to understand. Typical curb weight on our trucks is roughly 4400 pounds. With front engine, more of that weight is on the front axle at curb weight.

Looks like with the exception of the ZR2, the rear GAWR is 3500 pounds. Even if I take the 4400 pound curb weight and split it evenly between the two axles, that is 2200 pounds per axle, so the rear axle still has 1300 pounds of capacity.

Now, hopefully, no one loads 1100 pounds of concrete on the tailgate, they spread it out over the bed. Granted, may not be able to place it up against the cab if it is on a pallet, but a good forklift driver should be able to get it close. I know I could have when I was driving forklifts for a living.

@Goodspike makes a good point, the short bed may have less room for adjusting. Getting the load as close to the cab would shift some of the weight to the front axle.

Weight of the driver would tend to load the front axle more than the rear, rear seat passengers would impact the rear axle more.

If I was driving from my local Home Depot, less than a mile, I wouldn't blink. If I was driving 200 miles, I might consider a trailer. (Trailer easier to deal with than 2 trips of that length. )

If I was really lazy, I would just have Home Depot or whoever deliver it, and that way I only have to deal with carrying it from the pallet to the mixer I rented because mixing 18 bags of concrete in a wheel barrow with a shovel is a pain in the rear end. Having borrowed an electric mixer for roughly that number of bags of concrete, it is worth the rental.

Since I have 5 Home Depot stores that I can think of within 5 miles of my house, and at least 3, maybe 4 Lowes in same radius, I figure the trip is pretty short and I could take it easy. Some of you guys live out in the boonies.
My rear GAWR is 3,400LB. Scaling the truck without the trailer hitched up but with the ~175LB shell on the bed and family in the cab the weights were...

Front axle: 3,200
Rear axle: 2,680

Total 5,880. Typical curb weight for the CCLB diesel is actually about 5,000LB, not 4,400LB. Subtracting 175LB for the shell that puts it basically at 5,700LB. GVWR is 6,200LB. So 500LB and then it's over GVWR. ~720LB and it's over RAWR. ~300LB and it's over FAWR. My wife and kids don't add up to 400-600LB so even if they got out of the truck and I took the shell off I still wouldn't have the capacity to load 1,100LB into the bed considering my factory payload capacity was 1,219LB. Maybe a really small person could drive the truck with nobody and nothing else in the truck to not be over the limit, but even if under GVWR it would still likely be over RAWR.
 
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If I was really lazy, I would just have Home Depot or whoever deliver it,
The Seattle area has Dunn Lumber, which charges less than what HD and Lowes do for delivery. It's now $40, I think it used to be less. For anything long, large or very heavy I opt for delivery even though I own two trucks. Usually though it is length that's the issue for me.
 

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My rear GAWR is 3,400LB. Scaling the truck without the trailer hitched up but with the ~175LB shell on the bed and family in the cab the weights were...

Front axle: 3,200
Rear axle: 2,680

Total 5,880. Typical curb weight for the CCLB diesel is actually about 5,000LB, not 4,400LB. Subtracting 175LB for the shell that puts it basically at 5,700LB. GVWR is 6,200LB. So 500LB and then it's over GVWR. ~720LB and it's over RAWR. ~300LB and it's over FAWR. My wife and kids don't add up to 400-600LB so even if they got out of the truck and I took the shell off I still wouldn't have the capacity to load 1,100LB into the bed considering my factory payload capacity was 1,219LB. Maybe a really small person could drive the truck with nobody and nothing else in the truck to not be over the limit, but even if under GVWR it would still likely be over RAWR.
Thanks, that seems extremely high for axle weights. Would not have expected that. I know my truck weighs in real close to the curb weight listed on the specs I sent - noted it when I picked up some rock at the landscape place and they weighed me empty and full to charge me for rock. I know the diesel is a lot heavier, I was just glancing out the weights on that link I posted. The diesel and ZR2 definitely deviate from my numbers.

I wonder if what you have calculated here explains the various complaints about sprung rear leaf springs on many trucks. I could see it not being hard to load 800 pounds and over-stress the springs with your numbers.
 

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The manufacturer builds in a hefty safety margin. I would not hesitate to put 2,500 lbs in the bed for a hundred mile trip. If I knew I was overloaded, I would put my tires towards max pressure and keep the speed down to 55/60. I would watch the tire pressures on my nifty TPM page.

While I would not do this often, as a one off it would be fine.

when I replace tires on any pickup, I tend to look for E rated tires that take 80lbs pressure and can carry 3,500 lbs per tire. Even on half ton pickups. I pay attention to tire ratings more than GVWR. Tires are the failure you are most likely to experience.
 

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I know I'm late to respond, but putting some of cargo weight on the front passenger floorboard will help shift weight forward.
 

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How much do you weigh? How many companions? What model? What engine?

You are probably fine, but I am the guy who carried 1600 pounds of shingles and 1200 pounds of concrete on separate trips in my 1990 GMC Safari, so I may not be a good person to ask. Hopefully this link will help.

I haven't carried much in my Colorado yet but the truck I had before this, a 2004 Nissan Titan, I carried a pallet load of wood brick fuel a few times. It was 2000 lbs. a load. I got under it the first time and watched as they loaded it. Still had a few inches left before bottoming out. I didn't go very far and not over 35 mph but it made the trip with no problem.
 
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