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Nope. Dealership said they did not open it up.
If they don't know what is wrong with it, make sure they replace everything new, including injectors , fuel rail ect. How do they know it wasn't a bad injector, or fuel contamination that caused failure. Very strange indeed. Curious too see if they change just the engine, at that point you would think they knew it wasn't fuel or turbo related.
 

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If they don't know what is wrong with it, make sure they replace everything new, including injectors , fuel rail ect. How do they know it wasn't a bad injector, or fuel contamination that caused failure. Very strange indeed. Curious too see if they change just the engine, at that point you would think they knew it wasn't fuel or turbo related.
I believe they just do what GM tells them to do.
I suspect that GM has a very good idea what is wrong-they are just not sharing that information.
As I understand it, the whole engine is being replaced-long block, injectors, turbo, etc. Saying that, I don't know that for sure. We'll have that conversation next time I speak with the dealer.
 

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I believe they just do what GM tells them to do.
I suspect that GM has a very good idea what is wrong-they are just not sharing that information.
As I understand it, the whole engine is being replaced-long block, injectors, turbo, etc. Saying that, I don't know that for sure. We'll have that conversation next time I speak with the dealer.
Thank you.
 

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Got the truck back a week ago. Seems to run well now. GM even shipped it to me from the dealer 600 miles away-which was nice.
According to the work order, the No.1 piston was broken and had scored the cylinder walls. Metal debris in the pan and in the filter.

They replaced the entire engine assembly. This appears to include the long block including injectors, fuel rail and the EGR cooler. It does not include the turbo or IP.
 

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Got the truck back a week ago. Seems to run well now. GM even shipped it to me from the dealer 600 miles away-which was nice.
According to the work order, the No.1 piston was broken and had scored the cylinder walls. Metal debris in the pan and in the filter.

They replaced the entire engine assembly. This appears to include the long block including injectors, fuel rail and the EGR cooler. It does not include the turbo or IP.
Sounds like a failed small end piston pin, not the first either. Glad it all worked out for you.
 

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You should be fine, there were a few 16 and 17 piston/wrist pin failures. Being a new group of manufactured parts within you should be good to go. Really glad they replaced the injectors and rail.

PS use a fuel additive every fill, it's really cheap insurance. In the newer manuals they suggest using an additive.
 

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You should be fine, there were a few 16 and 17 piston/wrist pin failures. Being a new group of manufactured parts within you should be good to go. Really glad they replaced the injectors and rail.

PS use a fuel additive every fill, it's really cheap insurance. In the newer manuals they suggest using an additive.
I dont see anything in my 2020 manual about additives and it seems unnecessary. Of course all the companies that sell the additives will say you need it, but is there any real world data on modern diesel engines showing it matters?
 

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I dont see anything in my 2020 manual about additives and it seems unnecessary. Of course all the companies that sell the additives will say you need it, but is there any real world data on modern diesel engines showing it matters?
You need to be looking in the diesel supplement guide, it's not in the generic owner's manual.

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This is from page 32 of the 2020 2.8L Duramax Diesel Supplement [https://my.chevrolet.com/content/da...orado/2020-2.8l-duramax-diesel-supplement.pdf]:

"Fuel Additives: TOP TIER Detergent Diesel is highly recommended for use with your vehicle. If your area does not have TOP TIER Detergent Diesel, GM recommends the use of ACDelco Diesel Fuel Conditioner. This will help maintain optimal engine performance. GM does not recommend other aftermarket diesel additives. If low-quality diesel is used for refueling, GM recommends adding ACDelco Fuel System Treatment Plus-Diesel to help clean engine deposits. This is available only at your GM dealer."

I don't know that that means it is bad to use the aftermarket supplements, but GM does not recommend it.
 

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If low-quality diesel is used for refueling, GM recommends adding ACDelco Fuel System Treatment Plus-Diesel to help clean engine deposits. This is available only at your GM dealer."
Who is selling low-quality diesel anyway. Are you buying your diesel from someone selling it out of a garbage bag on the side of the road?, me either.
Any major oil companies product should be high quality. Find a busy one and change your fuel filters when you are supposed to.
 

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Who is selling low-quality diesel anyway. Are you buying your diesel from someone selling it out of a garbage bag on the side of the road?, me either.
There are low volume dealers that can be problematic. Also Top Tier diesel specifies additional lubricity, which is something the supplements do.

This last May I made the mistake of not filling before leaving a more populated area and filled up at a Chevron station that I assume may have still had some winter diesel in the tank. That was my worst fuel mileage ever towing, under 14 mpg, and I was at a very low level at only 254 miles even though that portion of the trip was basically just up the Columbia river, not that many hills or that much elevation gain. Usually I'd be closer to a quarter tank than empty at that range.
 

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Who is selling low-quality diesel anyway. Are you buying your diesel from someone selling it out of a garbage bag on the side of the road?, me either.
Any major oil companies product should be high quality. Find a busy one and change your fuel filters when you are supposed to.
My $.02, or maybe more like $1.05 :LOL:

The fuel itself should be clean and water free; a basic minimum that I am confident most stations selling diesel meet, especially if they are busy and have fresh fuel delivered often. The issue is mandated low sulfur diesel fuel, which is required to play nice with emissions equipment. The "desulfering" process during refining removes much of diesel fuel's natural lubricating qualities, leaving it "dry". A high pressure fuel pump, which basically is a cam driving a small piston to pressurize the common rail to the injectors at 30,000 PSI, relies on being bathed in fuel to cool and lubricate it.

The fuel sellers are supposed to add lubricating additive at the "rack" but America's minimum requirement for diesel fuel's lubricity (ability to minimize friction between two sliding surfaces under load) is marginal in my opinion with an HFFR wear scar of 520 microns, vs. Europe, which has a minimum spec of 460 microns. The infamous Bosch "CP4" high pressure fuel pump's failure rate is much higher in the US than it is in Europe.

The problem is when the high pressure pump fails, it typically sends tiny metal shards down the common rail, to the injectors and through the entire system.The injectors are very sensitive, the debris can damage them or even cause them to stick open, which can burn a hole though the affected injector's piston. So the question comes down to does one trust American fuel sellers with their sensitive diesel fuel system? I don't. The thing is, our trucks get great fuel economy, using additive is not a big additional expense, I think of it as insurance, and the extra cetane makes the engine start and run sweeter. A gallon jug goes for quite a long time too.

I like Optilube's "Summer" as it is reasonably inexpensive, has great lube qualities, cleans the system, and adds cetane. "Summer" does not do anything about water, but I don't look to my additive to deal with water, the fuel filters are designed to do that. Plus I went insane during COVID and added a 2 micron Racor marine filter/water separator after the OEM filter box. Before any additives are added, either by the fuel seller or end user, "diesel is diesel". My strategy is to buy the cheapest high volume station diesel I can find, and the treat the Hell out of it with additive. Been doing this since day 1, so far so good!
 

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The fuel sellers are supposed to add lubricating additive at the "rack" but America's minimum requirement for diesel fuel's lubricity (ability to minimize friction between two sliding surfaces under load) is marginal in my opinion with an HFFR wear scar of 520 microns, vs. Europe, which has a minimum spec of 460 microns. The infamous Bosch "CP4" high pressure fuel pump's failure rate is much higher in the US than it is in Europe.
FI pumps can and should be made to work with the lubricity level of the fuel that they will be subjected to. That US spec fuel has a lower lubricity that that of other areas of the world will not be an issue if the manufactures have taken that into consideration. Sulfur does add lubricity and its reduction has made a significant difference but it is not the only component in diesel fuel providing that lubricity.
The CP4 has not done well in the US, but the engines is has been failing in also have a much higher output and are installed in much larger vehicles than one would typically find them in in Europe. They are getting worked pretty hard over here-I don't think that should be overlooked when looking at why they have been failing. Other pumps seem to be doing just fine.
 

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@Sparky21 FYI, sulfur adds zero lubricity to diesel. It's the process of refining ULSD that makes the fuel dry, it's not the reduced sulfur itself that reduces lubricity.

In any event, diesel fuel quality in the US is all over the map and the use of a quality additive will help ensure a longer life for the fuel system components by helping to offset the impact of poor quality fuel.

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Drax's Duken's 295 post hit the nail on the head. I can say that when I put the additive in I see about 3/4 to 1mpg + and there is no doubt the engine starts and idles smoother. With the small gain in MPG the additive is a wash on cost. If I can offset wear on the HPFP with some extra added lubricity and protect my investment then so be it.
 

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Drax's 295 post hit the nail on the head. I can say that when I put the additive in I see about 3/4 to 1mpg + and there is no doubt the engine starts and idles smoother. With the small gain in MPG the additive is a wash on cost. If I can offset wear on the HPFP with some extra added lubricity and protect my investment then so be it.
Thanks, but that wasn't my post.

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