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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My 2017 was in need of a spark plug change which is due at 97,500 miles. Interestingly, I was not able to find a write up or a video of how to do it on this model. I did find a couple for the 2016 Colorado but the top end is not the same.

Anyway, I didn't have a video recorder handy but here is my write up to hopefully help out a fellow Colorado-er.

First of all, get the right plugs. The correct ones are iridium tipped and are fairly expensive. I got some AC/Delco plugs from Amazon for about $12 each. A bit pricey but at nearly 100K miles between recommended changes, I can live with it.

Start by taking off the engine cover. There are videos on doing this so I won't repeat that here. Next you'll want to remove the two plugs for the cam position sensors near the front of the RH side of the engine. Slide the little tab away from the mating part and then press HARD while pulling the connector off. It should come off relatively easily. The other one works the same way. Then pull the 3 ignition coil connectors after sliding the red tab back away from the engine. You may need to clip the strap that holds the wiring harness in place. Don't try to pull it out of the valve cover hole, it will (as always) break! (Pull the remaining part out of the holder and you can thread a new zip tie into that opening and re-secure the wiring.)

The valve cover has an insulating cover and you can just peel that back from the inside to the outside to expose the coils for the RH bank of the engine. Remove the 10mm bolts that hold the coils and then you should be able to pull them out. The plugs are 14mm so you'll need a deep well socket to remove the old plugs. Note that if you find oil in the wells, you have a leaking valve cover gasket and you'll want to fix that. The oil will foul your ignition coils and generally make a mess. I use a piece of plastic hose that fits over the insulator of the new plug to get the plug started in the threads but you can use other methods I am sure. I also like to use a tiny bit of anti-seize on the plug threads but that's up to you. Take care to avoid cross threading the new plugs! The rule I learned long ago is: "You cannot cross thread using your fingers!" The new plugs should be torqued to 13 ft-lbs. or 18 N-m.

The LH bank is a bit more difficult as the intake manifold must be removed. There are 8 14mm bolts on the RH side of the manifold, one 10mm bolt on the LH side, and 2 10mm bolts way in the back that attach the manifold to a black metal bracket. The 8 bolts on RH side and the one 10mm on the LH side have keepers on them so they stay in place once loosened. The two on the back, however, need to come out. Take care NOT to drop them in back of the manifold. The bolts look somewhat intimidating to remove but all are surprisingly accessible. I also removed the throttle-body (4 10mm bolts) to make the manifold lighter to lift but that's optional. There are two connectors on the rear LH side that are similar to the cam position sensor connectors. Unhook them, then there is a hose that connects just below them. Press the green button on it and it should pop off. The most difficult is the hose that is connected in the very center of the back of the manifold. I had to reach around with one hand on each side to get a grip on it. You need to push the red part of it down and then the connector will pop off.

At this point the manifold is free and it comes out by lifting the RH side first and pulling it out. There is just enough room to get it out. In my case a bunch of dead bugs were trapped in there and some of them fell into the now exposed intake ports. Clean out any debris that falls in and put some wadded up show towels to keep anything else from getting in.

Now you can see the entire valve cover for the LH bank and it's the same as the other one. Replace those plugs too and re-assemble.

In my case the plugs were visibly worn compared to the new one, which are pre-gapped by the way, so DO NOT GAP THEM! Also one of the old plugs had a split insulator so misfires were just waiting to happen.
 

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Did you happen to inspect the intake valves and ports to see how much carbon build up there was?
Only thing I would add is to use a proper spark plug socket with the insert (not just a regular deep socket) to avoid potentially cracking the insulator.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Did you happen to inspect the intake valves and ports to see how much carbon build up there was?
Only thing I would add is to use a proper spark plug socket with the insert (not just a regular deep socket) to avoid potentially cracking the insulator.
I did look down into the intakes and there was definitely some carbon buildup in the ports and on the valves which is to be expected for any engine with direct injection. In my opinion it probably should be cleaned and I may get to that eventually but the buildup was not as bad as I've seen posted elsewhere. I also have an 08 Mini Cooper S which has this too and I know that walnut hull blasting is a common resolution for this along with an oil trap that keeps the problem from recurring. My Mini has about 110K miles and the last time I had the intake off it didn't look too bad either.

Thanks for the tip on the spark plug wrench and you are correct, you can damage the insulator if the socket gets crooked. That's why I recommend using the plastic tube to insert and hand tighten the plug then use the socket to torque it. There was very little clearance in the well and so the possibility of the socket hitting the insulator was small. Had I known these were 14mm I'd have bought a properly size spark plug socket to add to my collection of all the other sizes used these days.
 

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Maybe I can help you feel better about those plugs costing $12. When I started changing plugs, they were around $0.35 a piece. So 6 of them would have run $2.10. Back then, they lasted around 10K, so over the course of a 100,000 miles, you could plan on replacing them around 10 times. Therfore $3.50 per cylinder or $22.10 for all of them. When inflation is figured in, those figures jump to $28.84 each cylinder or $173.04 for all six. Some folks were able to stretch that 10K into 20K by pulling the plugs, cleaning them, gaping them and putting them back in. So for the sake of discussion, let's cut those figures in half and say $14.42 per cylinder and $86.52 per set of six. Your $12 plugs look pretty good - and you don't have spend the time changing them out 10 (or more) times!
 

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That’s detailed, excellent description of the process. But I am wondering where you got the torque spec. The sources I have found give 25 to 30 N-m for a 14 mm plug in an aluminum head. Also, according to AC, the engine should be cooled down.
 

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That’s detailed, excellent description of the process. But I am wondering where you got the torque spec. The sources I have found give 25 to 30 N-m for a 14 mm plug in an aluminum head. Also, according to AC, the engine should be cooled down.
It depends if there is a crush washer or gasket or not..
Youre right about doing it cold. put cold plugs in a hot engine and they won't come out right.
 
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