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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure where to put this...

But I was wondering if anyone:
1. has experience towing with the 2.5L I4 (automatic)?
2. can answer whether 3500lbs is enough to pull out another stuck car/truck (from sand mostly)

Thanks!
 

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The 3500lb number isn't some magic number where the truck dies, it's based on calculations the manufacturer does, taking into account mileage, braking, tires, powerplant and a host of other statistics to end up with a safe, reliable tow rating.

There are plenty of instances of smaller trucks pulling way larger loads than their tow ratings, such as this S10 pulling out an F250 with a loaded double axle trailer:


Or a Tundra towing the space shuttle over the 405. Exceeding its tow rating by 26.5 times:


There are plenty of 4 cylinder owners here happy with the choice.
 

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The 3500 pound limit is based on many variables, including braking, safely accelerating on to a highway, being able to handle highway speeds with out the trailer sending you out of control, etc.

It is not based on pulling something out of a ditch at 2 MPH. Sure, if you tie a rope around your bumper and try to pull a 10K pound load out of a ditch, you may rip the hole bumper off your truck. But doing reasonable things should not result in a catastrophic failure of your truck.

FYI, a week ago I watched a Wrangler try to pull a 26K Rental box truck out of a ditch. It was fun to watch the 4 tires on the Wrangler dig 4 holes in the ground, but we weren't going anywhere. However, the F450 that drove up as we were working on extricating the truck had no problems pulling the rental truck out of the ditch.

My Canyon was a few hundred miles away, but without at least half a ton in the bed, it would have been useless in this rescue.
 

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Keep in mind also a situation like the S10 video above, the Ford was not inoperative. There is a BIG difference pulling dead weight and a vehicle that is running. There are a lot of general 'how to' video's. I don't know how much experience you have so I apologize if this information is too elementary. Here are some of my thoughts:

1. The receiver makes a great rear tow point but do not use the ball of a trailer hitch. If you are using a recovery strap you can often slide it in the receiver and get the pin through it. Better yet is to get a recovery hitch. I prefer the type that are not just a hook but a 'D-ring'.
2. Most mistakes are made on hooking up the vehicle that is stuck. You have to attach to the frame. Not the bumper, not the suspension.
3. Do not use chains. Use a 'recovery strap'. This is different than a 'tow strap'. Of course, you tend to use what is available.
4. Try slow steady power first. If you have 4wd and low gear use it. If this doesn't work try digging out the stuck vehicle a bit and then try again. Avoid fast jerking motions, this is where a proper 'recovery strap' helps, the recovery strap will actually stretch a bit and store some of the energy.
5. Try going in a straight a line as possible. I know this is 'obvious' but I have seen some entertaining recovery attempts.
6. It's hard to beat a winch. If you don't want to put one on your truck they make cradles that attach to the trailer hitch. It makes for a bit of a heavy load and you need to get the proper cables. Winching has it's own rules that I won't try to repeat here.
 

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It is the resistance of the towed vehicle that should be taken into account, not its gross weight. The surface (mud, sand, etc) and how deeply mired significantly affect this weight. We had little cards with calculations for this when I was in the Army. Things get stuck a lot in the field.

This site has pretty good calculations: http://www.pangaea-expeditions.com/resources/winchworksheet/index.html

Of course with enough pulleys you can pull any weight.

Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
 

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...

Of course with enough pulleys you can pull any weight.
That assumes you have an immovable object located in line with what you want to pull to attach the pulleys to.

And thank you for your service.
 

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That is true. Sometimes trees can work, sometimes you end up with a tree on top of the truck you are trying to recover.

Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
I see the tree as better than the concrete column you pull over. Or like that neighbor of mine that tried to use his brick pedestal for his mailbox as an anchor point and pulled his mailbox down in the street? (That was pretty funny, after I got out of eyesight and earshot of him.)
 
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When I am doing a serious winch pull I use wheel chocks and rocks to secure my Truck. If I am pulling someone up hill I use a jack stand (yes, I carry one) to keep the nose of the truck from diving. The jack stand also allows a bit more control by keeping the front suspension from loading and unloading.
 
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