What are you towing with your Colorado? - Page 3 - Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon
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post #41 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 03:55 PM
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Well the lakes are back to liquid and I finally got to pull the Malibu 22 mxz out of storage and down to the cabin. The zr2 duramax did great and I was impressed. Never got over 65 because it was all back roads but it pulled it no problem. Total weight of boat and trailer is right around 6500 lbs. This little truck pulled it better than any half tons I have owned. Exhaust brake worked like a champ. Love my Colorado even more now.
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post #42 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 04:05 PM
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Depends on the day :)

This day it was 2 yards of stone. With the trailer + stone I'm pretty sure I was at or possibly slightly above the rated capacity but it hauled it like a champ!


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post #43 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 08:52 PM
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I am towing a a 31ft travel trailer by Imagine (model # 2800BH). Trailer weight 63000lbs and when loaded about 6700lbs. I do not travel with a full tank of water, maybe 5 gals. I have the truck tuned with Duramax Tuner and have Airlift airbags installed. This truck has no issues pulling a trailer of this size. Love my Dmax.
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post #44 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:59 AM
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I'm looking for a similar travel trailer (29') and about 6000 lbs . I want to travel long distance with it. Is the size cause any problems or less handling ? At the same weight does a 24' have a better handling than a 29 ' ? And finaly does a sway bar is mendatory ?
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post #45 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 12:00 PM
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post #46 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 03:08 PM
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I am towing a a 31ft travel trailer by Imagine (model # 2800BH). Trailer weight 63000lbs
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post #47 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 03:27 PM
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I'm looking for a similar travel trailer (29') and about 6000 lbs . I want to travel long distance with it. Is the size cause any problems or less handling ? At the same weight does a 24' have a better handling than a 29 ' ? And finaly does a sway bar is mendatory ?
How are you determining the weight of the trailer? If looking at the dry weight then that will never happen, it will always weigh more. If you want to know if you could POTENTIALLY tow a given trailer then you should make sure the GVWR listed on the trailer's placard is less than your truck's max tow rating. That will at least get you in the ballpark.

As for length, yes that will make a big difference in how it tows. The longer the trailer the more surface area on the side, the more trailer is behind the trailer's axles, and the more leverage there is placed on your truck by wind pushing on the side of the trailer as well as weight behind the axles acting like a pendulum. The term "tail wagging the dog" is common when a trailer is too long for the vehicle that is towing it. Honestly, I wouldn't tow a travel trailer longer than 24 or 25 feet long with these trucks. 29 feet is likely going to be unpleasant, especially when dealing with crosswinds. A shorter trailer will definitely handle/tow better.

A weight-distributing hitch is required and you would want to use the best sway control hitch you can afford. I would recommend the Equal-I-Zer hitch, best sway control for the money.

But, let's get back to how much weight you can REALLY tow. Open your driver's door and look at the B-pillar (the post where the seat belt mounts), there will be a sticker that tells you what your max payload is for your truck. Take that number and subtract the weight of yourself, any other passengers, and any gear you've put into the truck. Then subtract another 75lb for the weight distributing hitch gear. That is roughly how much weight you have left for trailer tongue weight.

So let's say you have 1,300lb payload capacity. You and a passenger weigh 450lb combined, you don't have any other gear in the truck, and you have the 75lb hitch gear. 1,300 minus 525 is 775lb of payload capacity left for hitch weight. The hitch needs to be between 10% and 15% of the trailer's actual weight, 12% is a good number to shoot for.

So 775 / 12 * 100 = 6,458lb MAX trailer weight. If the dry weight of the trailer is listed as 6,000lb then by the time you add 2 propane tanks, a battery, food, bedding, clothes, chairs, and whatever else you need for your trip then you will be overweight.

I'm sure this sounds complicated and it can be if you're new to towing and travel trailers. Salespeople don't care about reality, they care about sales. They will quote dry weights for trailers and MAX tow ratings for trucks and then get you to believe that your truck can tow a given trailer NO problem. That has got a lot of people into trouble by being overweight.

Find out what your REAL maximum tow rating is for your actual truck and then find a trailer that has a GVWR that is no more than that weight. That is really the only way to help ensure you don't end up having too much trailer for your truck.
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post #48 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 04:07 PM
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How are you determining the weight of the trailer? If looking at the dry weight then that will never happen, it will always weigh more. If you want to know if you could POTENTIALLY tow a given trailer then you should make sure the GVWR listed on the trailer's placard is less than your truck's max tow rating. That will at least get you in the ballpark.

As for length, yes that will make a big difference in how it tows. The longer the trailer the more surface area on the side, the more trailer is behind the trailer's axles, and the more leverage there is placed on your truck by wind pushing on the side of the trailer as well as weight behind the axles acting like a pendulum. The term "tail wagging the dog" is common when a trailer is too long for the vehicle that is towing it. Honestly, I wouldn't tow a travel trailer longer than 24 or 25 feet long with these trucks. 29 feet is likely going to be unpleasant, especially when dealing with crosswinds. A shorter trailer will definitely handle/tow better.

A weight-distributing hitch is required and you would want to use the best sway control hitch you can afford. I would recommend the Equal-I-Zer hitch, best sway control for the money.

But, let's get back to how much weight you can REALLY tow. Open your driver's door and look at the B-pillar (the post where the seat belt mounts), there will be a sticker that tells you what your max payload is for your truck. Take that number and subtract the weight of yourself, any other passengers, and any gear you've put into the truck. Then subtract another 75lb for the weight distributing hitch gear. That is roughly how much weight you have left for trailer tongue weight.

So let's say you have 1,300lb payload capacity. You and a passenger weigh 450lb combined, you don't have any other gear in the truck, and you have the 75lb hitch gear. 1,300 minus 525 is 775lb of payload capacity left for hitch weight. The hitch needs to be between 10% and 15% of the trailer's actual weight, 12% is a good number to shoot for.

So 775 / 12 * 100 = 6,458lb MAX trailer weight. If the dry weight of the trailer is listed as 6,000lb then by the time you add 2 propane tanks, a battery, food, bedding, clothes, chairs, and whatever else you need for your trip then you will be overweight.

I'm sure this sounds complicated and it can be if you're new to towing and travel trailers. Salespeople don't care about reality, they care about sales. They will quote dry weights for trailers and MAX tow ratings for trucks and then get you to believe that your truck can tow a given trailer NO problem. That has got a lot of people into trouble by being overweight.

Find out what your REAL maximum tow rating is for your actual truck and then find a trailer that has a GVWR that is no more than that weight. That is really the only way to help ensure you don't end up having too much trailer for your truck.
I suck at word problems. I have a 2016 Z71 Duramax.. 500 pounds of passengers. The trailer i am looking at maxed out would be 5800 fully loaded, how much stuff can i put in the bed and cab LOL plus i have a 200lbs cap on it.

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post #49 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 04:08 PM
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PS, i have a weight distributing hitch with sway control..

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post #50 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 04:15 PM
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I suck at word problems. I have a 2016 Z71 Duramax.. 500 pounds of passengers. The trailer i am looking at maxed out would be 5800 fully loaded, how much stuff can i put in the bed and cab LOL plus i have a 200lbs cap on it.
Go out and tell me what the payload amount is on the placard stuck to your B-pillar.

That trailer probably puts around 700lb on the hitch.

So 700lb hitch weight + 500lb of people + 200lb cap + 75lb weight-distributing hitch gear = 1,475lb of payload. If the payload number on the sticker is less than that then you are likely already overweight without putting anything else in the bed or cab of the truck. If it's more than 1,475lb then the payload number on the sticker minus 1,475lb is how much more weight you can put in the truck.

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PS, i have a weight distributing hitch with sway control..
I would hope so! :D

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post #51 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:07 PM
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Go out and tell me what the payload amount is on the placard stuck to your B-pillar.

That trailer probably puts around 700lb on the hitch.

So 700lb hitch weight + 500lb of people + 200lb cap + 75lb weight-distributing hitch gear = 1,475lb of payload. If the payload number on the sticker is less than that then you are likely already overweight without putting anything else in the bed or cab of the truck. If it's more than 1,475lb then the payload number on the sticker minus 1,475lb is how much more weight you can put in the truck.



I would hope so! :D
Here you go1
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post #52 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:09 PM
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Here you go1


That’s not the payload sticker, that’s the certification label. The payload sticker is up higher and has tire info and yellow parts.


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post #53 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:14 PM
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That’s not the payload sticker, that’s the certification label. The payload sticker is up higher and has tire info and yellow parts.


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Bummer LOL

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post #54 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:16 PM
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Bummer LOL


It looks like this. The key part is the “occupants and cargo should never exceed XXX lbs.”




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post #55 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:22 PM
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1422 is the payload

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post #56 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:53 PM
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1422 is the payload


So you are likely overloaded by 53LB already.

There’s one saving grace that is like a “bonus” but I really don’t like to suggest anyone count on this to save them when it comes to trailer weights.

Properly adjusted, the WDH will shift roughly 33% of the hitch weight back to the trailer’s axles. 33% of 700lb is 231lb.

231lb minus the 53LB you’re likely overweight by gives you roughly 178lb before you’re truly and completely overweight with nothing to save you.

That said, the only way to truly know if you’re overweight is to spend a few bucks and get your entire rig weighed at your local CAT scales, trailer hitched up and all. That will tell you how heavy your truck and trailer really are when hitched up. If the sum of the steer and drive axle weights exceed your truck’s GVWR then you’re overweight. Similarly, if the steer axle weight exceeds the FAWR or the rear axle weight exceed the RAWR then you’re also overweight.

Midsize, half-ton, and 3/4 ton trucks run out of payload before you reach max tow capacity. Just the annoying way the calculations work out.


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post #57 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-21-2018, 09:31 AM
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On my payload sticker (tire sticker) it says 1270 lbs. When i said 6000 lbs it was 5000 lbs dry weight and an approx 1000 lbs of payload.
I am looking for 3 trailers:

2006 jayco 4970 lbs 29 '
2004 fleetwood 5187 lbs 24'
2007 keystone 4576 lbs 21'

I think the last one is the best choice regarding whats you said before
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post #58 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-21-2018, 09:47 AM
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On my payload sticker (tire sticker) it says 1270 lbs. When i said 6000 lbs it was 5000 lbs dry weight and an approx 1000 lbs of payload.
I am looking for 3 trailers:

2006 jayco 4970 lbs 29 '
2004 fleetwood 5187 lbs 24'
2007 keystone 4576 lbs 21'

I think the last one is the best choice regarding whats you said before


Depending on how many people and how much gear you take in the truck, weight-wise those are all possible. At 6,000lb you would have roughly 475lb left for people and stuff in/on the truck.

Length-wise, the last one would definitely tow the best with the middle one probably being OK.

I towed a 31’ trailer with a full-size half-ton truck and it was too long for my comfort level. Towing on vacation should be relaxing and that wasn’t. Upgraded to an HD truck for that trailer and it was perfect.

Currently towing a 21’ hybrid with my Canyon, weighs around 5,000lb loaded and ready to go. Very happy with this setup, but with 4 people and the topper I have to be careful how much more weight I put in the truck. Typically it’s just folding chairs in the back, everything else in the trailer.


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post #59 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-21-2018, 09:51 AM
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Depends on the day :)

This day it was 2 yards of stone. With the trailer + stone I'm pretty sure I was at or possibly slightly above the rated capacity but it hauled it like a champ!


Just curious, do you use a weight distributing hitch?

I tow similar loads in my 5x10 dump trailer with just the 10k ball. It is all local work and it seems to do fine.

Thanks.
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post #60 of 278 (permalink) Old 05-21-2018, 12:24 PM
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Just curious, do you use a weight distributing hitch?

I tow similar loads in my 5x10 dump trailer with just the 10k ball. It is all local work and it seems to do fine.

Thanks.
Nope, just my regular receiver hitch. It seemed to tow it just find. That being said I don't haul loads quite that heavy all the time, and to be fair I just got the trailer like 6 weeks ago. Also the run from the stone yard home was about 18 miles and either back roads or small highway (no interstate) so I never really pulled it higher than about 55mph. With stone or other materials the weight seems to balance fairly well since it evenly fits into the trailer.

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